Montague Ullman Dreaming as a Metaphor in Motion Tesi di Maryam Romagnoli Sacchi

Montague Ullman Dreaming as a Metaphor in Motion Tesi di Maryam Romagnoli Sacchi

Fondazione Scuole civiche di Milano Istituto superiore interpreti e traduttori via A. Visconti 18 20151 Milano

Relatore: Professor Bruno Osimo Correlatore: Professor Vincenzo Bonini

Diploma di mediazione linguistica 17 ottobre 2002

1

The Dream is a law to itself; and as well quarrel with a rainbow for showing, or for not showing, a secondary arch. The Dream knows best, and the Dream, I say again, is the responsible party.—De Quincey

THERE is a timely need for the revision of dream theory along the following lines: (1) away from metapsychological speculation about dream origins, functions, form, and structure; (2) toward seeing the dream as an aspect of a total behavioral response; (3) toward examining the formal characteristics of dream thought in their intimate association with the altered level of brain function occurring at the time; (4) toward an examination of content as derivative of a social existence that in turn has unknown as well as known dimensions; and (5) toward the development and application of techniques for translating the dream metaphor that are not derived from or limited by specific theoretical systems.

The first four points have been considered in earlier communications1234. This presentation will address itself, in the main, to the last point.

Since the properties of metaphor as revealed in the dream will be our concern, let us begin with a dictionary definition of the term:

Metaphor.—”A figure of speech in which one object is likened to another by asserting it to be that other or speaking of it as if it were the other” (Funk and Wagnall’s New Standard Dictionary of the English Language, 1928). The roots are from the Greek meta meaning over and phero, meaning bear. Brown5 refers to metaphor as “the name for the utterance that suggests its referent through a transfer of meaning.”

Langer writes of metaphor as an instrument of abstraction. It comes into play in situations where an idea is genuinely new. It has no name and there is no word to express it. “When new unexploited possibilities of thought crowd in upon the human mind the poverty of everyday language becomes acute.”6 A process of abstraction is necessary before meaning can be grasped

2

as a thing apart from its concrete presentational aspects. Where the gap exists in situations of this sort it is through the use of metaphor that we can take a conceptual leap forward and establish an initial abstract position in relation to a new element in experience.

Langer7 also notes the paradoxical features of this kind of abstract thought and this is a point of crucial significance in connection with dreaming. She points out that the use of metaphor implies that abstract thinking is going on in a paradoxical sense. Metaphor is essentially a conceptualizing process but one that uses concrete imagery as the instrument for arriving at the abstraction.

If we extend the concept of metaphor to include the visual mode, we may restate its essential characteristics as follows as a first step in exploring its applicability to dream phenomena:
1. Metaphor involves the use of word or image in an improbable context.
2. This is done in order to capture and express a level of meaning that is freshly arrived at and in that sense new. (We are concerned with “live” metaphors rather than “faded” or “dead” ones referred to by linguists.)

3. The use of metaphor creates a greater impact and is more revealing of essential features than a literal statement.

Our main thesis is that dreaming involves rapidly changing presentational sequences which in their unity amount to a metaphorical statement (major metaphor). Each element (minor metaphor) in the sequence has metaphorical attributes organized toward the end of establishing in a unified way an over-all metaphorical description of the new ideas and relations and their implications as these rise to the surface during periods of activated sleep. In contrast to the brain-damaged patient in whom the power of abstraction is lost, the dreamer retains his abstracting ability. The physiologically altered brain milieu, however, does exert a limiting influence.

3

The dreamer’s abstracting powers are limited to the manipulation of concrete images.

Let us now consider dreaming in the light of the three properties of metaphor described above.

Context.—In the dream images do appear in improbable contexts. In fact, this is one of the features distinguishing cognitive content during activated sleep from content recoverable during other phases of sleep. Incongruity of elements, inappropriate relations, displacement, are all well known attributes of dreams.

Newness.—The value of dreams in therapy lies in the fact that they do say something new or at least new in the sense of its unfamiliarity to waking consciousness. Unless this were so, dreams would hardly be worth pursuing. It is the nature of the newness that has to be defined. It is precisely around this question that classical psychoanalytic notions about dreaming have been challenged by a host of critical comment converging from such disparate sources as experimentalists on the one hand8 and phenomenologists on the other,9 as well as from within the ranks of psychoanalysts themselves.101112

Freud regarded the newness as emerging in the form of a compromise arising out of the dash of two intrapsychic systems, namely, unconscious and conscious. The model is that of energy transfer within a closed system with the dreamer limited in his expression of novelty to his own particular repertoire of artful camouflage. True novelty is drained out in the insistence on the role of unchanging instinctual energies linked to infantile wishes in accounting for the fact of dreaming. Followed to its logical conclusion what emerges is an image of man as an impotent reactor—”a complicatedly constructed and programmed robot, perhaps, but a robot nevertheless.”13

Transformation and change and, with them, the element of novelty, are just as much features of dream consciousness as they are of waking consciousness. To arrive at an understanding of how they come about during the dream state we have to replace metaphysical speculation with a more

4

rigorous analysis of the psychological needs of the sleeping human organism and how the symbolic expression of these needs is influenced by the changes in brain milieu that occur during sleep. The former relate to the content of dreams, the latter to their form.

While asleep our brain is functioning differently and our psychological system is responsive to a different input and organized toward a different behavioral goal than in the waking state. When there are sufficient quantitative changes in brain milieu a qualitative change comes about that exerts a tremendously significant limiting influence on the articulating psychological system. Thought processes become bound to concrete presentations. The intact individual in the waking state is capable of thought processes reflecting events extended in time through a discursive mode of symbolic organization but he is at the same time capable of borrowing concrete expressions for intended metaphorical use. The brain-damaged patient cannot abstract and cannot employ metaphor. The closest he comes to it is in the use of unintended metaphor or quasimetaphor. The dreamer is somewhere in between. He has not lost the power of abstraction, but a sufficient alteration in brain milieu has occurred to influence the way in which the abstraction is arrived at and the way in which it gains expression. He is forced into a concrete sensory mode and, hence, the need to manipulate visual presentations toward the goal of a metaphorical explication of an inner state. I suggest that this necessity arises from physiological rather than psychological considerations. Under the conditions of sleep, behavior is not and cannot be directed toward the outside world. Input channels close down and normal motor effector pathways are inhibited. Consciousness, whether while dreaming or awake, cannot be divorced from the activity of the organism. The existence of a sensory mode of conscious expression does appear to be appropriate to the only effector system available to the sleeping organism, namely, the arousal mechanism or the reticular activating system (referred to as the vigilance system by Hernandez-Peon14). The behavioral

5

response in this instance would be an internal one in the form of an influence upon the level of arousal.

To develop this point further requires emphasis on the intimate relationship of conscious experience at a given moment to the activity the individual is engaged in. Activity has a different complexion in the waking state than it has during activated sleep. In the former, the term refers to that segment of the individual’s social practice, ie, his ongoing behavior in a social context, which happens to be in focus at a particular time. In the case of the dreamer, activity has to do with internal change or, more exactly, the potential for internal change, namely the possibility of a change from a state of activated sleep to one of full arousal. In the waking state all new afferent stimuli carry a double message to the central nervous system, one mediated through the reticular system and exerting an arousal effect and the other, which has an informational effect, through the direct sensory pathways to the cortex. While the dreamer is awake the factor of arousal makes possible a more effective orientation to the informational aspects of the stimulus. The dual significance of afferent stimuli is preserved in the dreaming state but with two important differences. An internal source of afferent stimuli is mobilized out of experiential data and the relative importance of the informational and arousal aspects of the stimuli is reversed. In the dreaming state the informational aspects serve the need to sustain and modulate the arousal level and, if necessary, bring about a full arousal effect. The metaphor, through the properties of vividness, emphasis, incongruity, and dramatic presentation, is suited to do just that. The obscurity of the metaphor may be related to the complexity and degree of strangeness of the situation being represented. The movement of the metaphor is the result of attention-directing processes brought into operation once initial activation occurs. The feelings rising to the surface at this time are new in the sense of not having come clearly into focus during the waking state. They act as motivational processes,1516 exerting a further energizing or arousal effect serving to organize or direct further behavioral change. The task before the dreamer is to express relations he has never before experienced. The sensory effects streaming down to the arousal center employ the visual mode predominantly and as these generate further arousal new and relevant motivational systems or feelings are tapped.

6

When we are awake we can tune out our feelings, but when we are asleep we have no choice but to express them should our nervous system become sufficiently aroused to allow us to do so. Feelings are, as Leeper emphasizes, processes capable of being touched off by very slight stimuli. In the case of the dreamer, such stimuli generally take the form of the day residue.

Other characteristics of feelings as a subclass of motives are also relevant to dreaming. These include:

1. Motives modify perceptual processes so that they become organized in a way that makes relevant items stand out forcefully. Elements appearing in dreams are selected on the basis of relevance. Beginning with an affective residue reexperienced at the onset of activated sleep, there is a heightened focal attention to the significant recent event responsible for this affective residue.

2. Motives initiate exploratory activity. The dreamer embarks upon a longitudinal exploration of relevant past data.

3. Motives act as regulatory mechanisms in the service of psychological homeostasis. As a consequence of the feelings initially evoked at the onset of dreaming and as further developed by the exposure of relevant past experiential data, the dreamer moves toward the resolution of any resulting psychological dysequilibrium, either by summoning up defenses or by the creative utilization of positive resources and growth potential.

The Use of Metaphor.—Under the conditions of activated sleep the concrete metaphorical mode is characteristic of this translation of felt reactions into conscious experience. It is in this sense that the dream is essentially a metaphor in motion. As indicated above, the dreamer has to concern himself with understanding new data. The reason a day residue serves as the precipitating mechanism for the subject matter of a dream is precisely because it is experienced as a faint beam of light playing upon shadowy, unknown, and sometimes rather frightening territory. The

7

exploration of this territory — that is, the capacity to engage with the new — requires the power of abstraction. The dreamer, forced to employ a sensory mode, has to build the abstraction out of concrete blocks in the form of visual sequences. The resulting metaphor can be viewed as an interface phenomenon where the biological system establishes the sensory medium as the vehicle for this expression and the psychological system furnishes the specific content.

To appreciate more fully the need for metaphorical expression during periods of activated sleep we have to introduce the concept of social vigilance. This concept involves an orientation to and exploration of events that impinge on the human organism in a novel way and which are, therefore, capable of influencing or changing the current level of social homeostasis. For the human organism, events of this kind tend to assume a mediated and symbolic form rather than the immediate and physically intrusive form characterizing vigilance operations in lower animals. The individual’s equilibrium is upset in one of two ways by such an event. An area of ignorance may be uncovered which then serves as a stimulus to growth and mastery or an area of psychological vulnerability may be exposed in which case efforts at mastery may be handicapped by defensive operations with the result that false or mythic explanations may either color the picture or even predominate in shaping the response.

Vigilance theory can be linked to dreaming by conceiving of the activated sleep state as instigated by a built-in physiologically governed mechanism providing the organism with periodic opportunities throughout the night to process internal or external data in such a way that awakening can occur if necessary by bypassing the main cyclical and gradual variations in levels of sleep. In doing this the organism may be borrowing a mechanism that may or may not have been related to vigilance operations originally.

The essence of a workable vigilance mechanism, as the survival of any lower animal attests, lies in its enforced truthfulness. If information conveyed

8

is false or its interpretation is inappropriate, the danger is enhanced. So it is with the dreamer. He is not at the mercy of deeper instinctual forces seeking to gain expression on the basis of fulfilling an infantile wish, but rather is dreaming of truer and more inclusive aspects of his own existence as partially exposed by a recent event in his life. He is concerned with such fundamental questions as: Who am I? What is happening to me? What can I do about it? The dreamer is making a very active attempt to reflect in consciousness the immediate aspect of his own existence. The dream in its totality is a metaphorical explication of a circumstance of living explored in its fullest implications for the current scene. To see the dream as an elaborate strategy to achieve gratification of a wish is to limit salience to one particular motive at the expense of the surging, forward-looking, exploring, chance- taking operations that also occur. The day residue, reappearing in the dream, confronts the individual either with new and personally significant data or forces a confrontation with heretofore unrecognized unintended consequences of one’s own behavior. There follows an exploration in depth with the immediate issue polarizing relevant data from all levels of one’s own past in an effort to both explore the implications of the intrusive event and to arrive at a resolution. What is unconscious in the presentations appearing in the dream are those aspects of his felt responses which cannot be accurately conceptualized, either because they have not heretofore been personally conceptualized, or because they are derivative of social relations that are not understood and hence cannot be conceptualized. When the personal or social unknown gains expression in the dream, it does so in a personal idiom and by as apt a metaphor as the individual can construct to describe what it feels like.

The following brief examples illustrate some of the points under discussion,

EXAMPLE I.—An architect, with schizoid tendencies, was under pressure to complete a set of drawings on time to meet a deadline. He was forced to devote four successive Sundays to the completion of this work. He had to isolate himself from

9

the rest of his family which includes his wife and four children. His wife managed well for the first three weeks but on this fourth Sunday was in a fretful and irritable mood. He remained closeted in his room for the entire day. He was vaguely aware of his wife’s feelings and from time to time would hear her lose her temper at the children. He fell asleep for a short time and had the following dream:

“I was calling the weather bureau to ask if the hurricane was expected to hit the city that afternoon. As I was asking the question I began to feel embarrassed and guilty. I awoke as I was trying to terminate the call.”

He awoke with the dream in mind. The associations to the dream were as follows:

He had a growing feeling of uneasiness with regard to the burden he was placing upon his wife, but felt that it was necessary and unavoidable. He associated the metaphor of the hurricane to the recurrent blasts of his wife’s temper, particularly in view of the fact that if another hurricane were in reality to occur its name would have begun with the same initial as that of his wife’s name. The incidental event precipitating the dream was the occasional sounds of his wife’s quarrels with the children which reached his ears while he was intensely preoccupied with the work he was doing. The contradiction which was deepened and brought closer to full awareness was one arising from the discrepancy between the actual nature of his activity on the one hand — the arbitrary and absolute way in which he cut himself off from his family when under pressure — and the way in which this activity was reflected in consciousness — that this was simply a necessary but transitory interlude in his family life which the others owed it to him to countenance. The reactions of his wife, related to his actual activity rather than to his conceptualized version of it, induced uneasy feelings. These feelings were the first expression in consciousness of the growing recognition of his own responsibility. They arose in connection with the real although indirect protests by his wife. His rationalizations were being forced to give way before a more accurate reflection of the entire situation namely, that whatever pressure the work subjected him to, it did not justify the absolute

10

kind of severance that he had effected with his family in total disregard of their needs.

EXAMPLE 2.—A dapper 63-year-old man, depressed over a period of several months, related a dream occurring several nights following his first visit:

‘I was the last guy in the world. There was nobody left. I found myself isolated. It woke me. I was very happy that I could get up and go to work.”

The patient had come for help at a point where all of his activities had become sharply curtailed and where he had become phobic about even leaving the house. He did, however, verbalize the hope that he could return to work. He appeared to need the active intervention and support of an outside authority to risk rejoining the world of other men and the world of business. The dream occurred in the context of feeling better following the first visit and a successful effort to mobilize himself to return to work. At the point where he began to move out of his depression he was able to create an image describing both the ultimate in hopeless alienation from all other men and at the same time one that lent itself to sudden termination by the simple process of awakening. The minor metaphor expresses an inexorable and utterly hopeless feeling of separation from all other men. To understand the major metaphor one has to take into account the behavioral effect of the dream, namely awakening, and with it the transformation of the feeling of hopelessness into its opposite. He is saying, in effect, “I can now relate to my illness as if it were a bad dream from which one awakens with relief.”

We have offered very little thus far concerning the laws governing the movement and development of the global or major metaphor of the dream. It is likely that the full exposition of the developmental aspects of the dream process will have to await further investigative effort using the new monitoring techniques at hand. Descriptively the dream evolves from the setting or presenting metaphor by extending its range horizontally through the elaboration of motivational process implied or alluded to in the setting and extending its scope longitudinally by introducing related motivational processes derived from earlier experience. The development is organized

11

rather than haphazard and reintegrative efforts are made, resulting in a resolution which in terms of its affective intensity either is or is not compatible with the normal temporal parameters of the activated sleep period in which it is occurring. These ideas could be tested experimentally by systematically examining the relationship of hypnagogic imagery to dream sequences of the same night. Is the hypnagogic image simply the first step in dreaming, namely, the translation of the last remembered bit of cognitive data into a visual image? Does it lack subsequent development and enrichment and remain as a “forme fruste” of the dream because the period of cortical activation needed to produce a dream is too fleeting in nature during the initial descent into deep sleep? A comparison of the two phenomena highlights the lack in hypnagogic image of the developmental features that characterizes the dream. The latter by comparison tends to be more complex, more dynamic, more evocative of the past and more apt to go beyond the immediate antecedent content of consciousness. In the dream the initial translation is the starting point of an active exploratory process extending throughout the period of activated sleep. A further difference involves the behavioral effect. Full arousal is rarely the result of hypnagogic imagery but it not infrequently occurs during the dream. Perhaps the hypnagogic image can be likened to a word which, no matter how unique or colorful, cannot compare in richness and expressive potential to the fully developed sentence.

The Dream Mystique.—The failure to perceive the full significance of the expository role of metaphor in dream consciousness has had a number of unfortunate consequences for the theory and practice of psychotherapy. Once the puzzling nature and apparent mystery of the dream was equated with unconscious but purposeful efforts at self-deception powerful supports for an instinctivist psychology came into being. The sum of man’s complicated relations to his social milieu is reduced to intrapsychic conflicts directed toward the subjugation and control over his own biology. Chein,

12

referring to this distorted view of man, writes: “Contemporary psychologists, it seems to me, tend to be rather obsessed with the corporeality of man and to be constantly diverted from the human being to the human body.” He further notes: “The emphasis on corporeality as the

essential quality of man is, of course, evident in the naïve — if persistent — effort to reduce psychological to bodily process. This is again a matter of philosophy dictating psychological theory.”

This point of view concerning man and the dream reflecting the struggle between instinctual wish and social prohibition has had a very limiting effect on the potential therapeutic application of dream interpretation. A relationship between dreaming and dream interpretation arose that was rather inappropriately and incongruously forced into a fixed medical model. The end-product more closely resembled the relationship between a patient, his heartbeat reflected in the electrocardiogram, and the physician who has the specialized knowledge needed to interpret the record. In the case of the dream, a universal phenomenon is dealt with as if it, too, were a special record decipherable only by an expert. [...]

In the dream the visual image and the referent are linked by the element of similarity , hence the metaphorical quality . The view that has been expressed here is that this translation serves the same expressive purpose that figurative speech serves in the waking state. The other and traditional point of view de-emphasizes the metaphorical relation between referent and image and treats the image almost exclusively in terms of its associational connection with sex or aggression. As Bertalanffy17 points out, dream elements in a freudian sense are not true symbols, but rather what he terms free playing associations. Each element, by virtue of certain formal characteristics, stands for something else. Here the term “stands for” conveys a meaning opposite to metaphor, namely, one of obscuring, hiding, concealing. The end point of the latter development has been the evolution of a dream mystique whereby dream interpretation becomes a special tool in

13

the hands of a few, safeguarded by caveats of all sorts, most of which point to the dangers of inexpert dream interpretation and of deep interpretation. As a consequence, all but psychoanalysts and analytically trained physicians and psychologists carefully eschew any pretense at utilizing dreams. The dream as a potential instrument for self-learning hardly comes into its own under these circumstances. An aspect of ourselves that, in subtle and dramatic ways, highlights movement change and the creative interplay of old patterns and newly evoked responses remains a refined tool in the hands of the few rather than a widely developed and broadly applied medium for self-understanding.

References

Il Sogno è una regola in sé; e litiga con l’arcobaleno per mostrare, o non mostrare, un secondo arco. Il Sogno ben sa e il Sogno, ripeto, è il solo responsabile.—De Quincey

È opportuno rivedere la teoria del sogno in base ai seguenti princìpi: 1. allontanandosi da speculazioni metapsicologiche riguardo a origini, funzioni forma e struttura del sogno; 2. in direzione di una visione del sogno come risposta totalmente comportamentale; 3. in direzione di un’analisi delle caratteristiche formali del pensiero onirico in rapporto alla loro stretta associazione con l’alterazione del grado di funzionamento del cervello durante il sonno; 4. in direzione di un’analisi del contenuto, il quale è determinato da un’esistenza sociale che, a sua volta, possiede aspetti sia noti sia sconosciuti; 5. in direzione dello sviluppo e dell’applicazione di tecniche per la traduzione della metafora onirica che non ha origine né è limitata da sistemi teorici specifici.

I primi quattro punti sono stati analizzati in studi precedenti1234. Questo articolo, in generale, è rivolto all’ultimo punto.

14

Poiché ci occuperemo delle caratteristiche della metafora così come vengono rivelate dal sogno, partiamo da una definizione da dizionario del termine:

Metaphor. «A figure of speech in which one object is likened to another by asserting it to be that other or speaking of it as if it were the other»∗. (Funk and Wagnall New Standard Dictionary of the English Language, 1928). Il termine deriva dal greco meta, indicante «oltre» e fero che significa «portare». Brown5 definisce metafora «il nome dell’enunciazione che indica il proprio referente attraverso un trasferimento di significato».

La Langer descrive la metafora come strumento di astrazione. Entra in gioco in situazioni in cui si presenta un’idea assolutamente nuova. Non esiste nome o parola per esprimerla. «Quando nella mente umana si affollano nuove possibilità di pensiero non sfruttate, si acuisce la povertà del linguaggio di tutti i giorni»6. Prima che il significato possa essere afferrato indipendentemente dai suoi concreti aspetti apparenti è necessario un processo di astrazione. Quando esiste un divario in questo genere di situazioni, attraverso l’uso della metafora è possibile compiere un salto concettuale e stabilire una posizione astratta iniziale in relazione all’esperienza di un nuovo elemento.

La Langer7 nota anche le caratteristiche paradossali di questo tipo di pensiero astratto, punto di cruciale importanza in relazione all’attività onirica. Sottolinea che l’uso della metafora implica che il pensiero astratto procede in una direzione paradossale. La metafora altro non è che un processo di concettualizzazione che, però, ricorre a immagini concrete come strumento per giungere all’astrazione.

Se estendiamo il concetto di metafora alla modalità visiva, possiamo riportare le sue caratteristiche essenziali come primo passo per esplorare l’applicabilità della metafora ai fenomeni del sogno nel modo seguente:

∗ «Figura retorica attraverso cui un oggetto è paragonato a un altro affermando che quell’oggetto è l’altro o parlandone come se lo fosse» [N.d.T.].

15

  1. La metafora comporta l’uso di una parola o immagine in un contesto improbabile.
  2. Questo ha lo scopo di catturare ed esprimere un livello di significato acquisito di recente e in questo senso nuovo. (Ci occupiamo di metafore «vive» piuttosto che di metafore «morte» o «spente» a cui fanno riferimento i linguisti.)
  3. L’uso della metafora crea un effetto maggiore e rivela in misura superiore le caratteristiche essenziali rispetto a un’affermazione letterale.

    La nostra tesi principale è che l’attività onirica comporta un rapido

cambiamento di sequenze descrittive, che nella loro totalità corrispondono a un’affermazione metaforica (metafora maggiore). Ogni elemento (metafora minore) della sequenza possiede attributi metaforici organizzati allo scopo di stabilire in maniera unitaria una descrizione metaforica complessiva delle nuove idee, relazioni e implicazioni quando esse emergono durante le fasi del sonno attivo. Contrariamente ai pazienti con lesioni cerebrali, il sognatore mantiene la capacità di astrazione. Tuttavia il milieu cerebrale, modificato a livello fisiologico, esercita un’influenza restrittiva. Le capacità di astrazione del sognatore sono ridotte alla manipolazione d’immagini concrete.

Analizziamo ora l’attività onirica alla luce delle tre suddette proprietà della metafora.

Contesto. Nel sogno le immagini in effetti si presentano in contesti improbabili. Di fatto questo è uno degli aspetti che contraddistingue il contenuto cognitivo degli intervalli di sonno attivo da quello recuperabile durante le altre fasi. Discordanza tra gli elementi, relazioni inadeguate e spostamento sono note caratteristiche dei sogni.

Novità. L’importanza dei sogni nella terapia sta nel fatto che, in effetti, svelano qualcosa di nuovo o, per lo meno, nuovo in relazione alla loro scarsa familiarità con la coscienza della veglia. Se così non fosse, non varrebbe la pena indagare i sogni. È la natura di novità che va definita. Proprio su questo

16

punto le nozioni classiche della psicoanalisi riguardanti l’attività onirica sono state messe in discussione da numerosi commenti critici provenienti da fonti diverse: sperimentalisti da una parte8 e fenomenologisti dall’altra9, ma anche dalle schiere degli psicoanalisti stessi101112.

Freud riteneva che la novità fosse una forma di compromesso, risultato di un conflitto tra due sistemi intrapsichici, ossia inconscio e coscienza. Il modello è quello del trasferimento d’energia all’interno di un sistema chiuso in cui il sognatore vede limitata l’espressione di novità dal proprio repertorio di camuffamento artificioso. La vera originalità scompare con l’insistenza sul ruolo delle energie istintive invariate legate ai desideri infantili per spiegare l’attività onirica. Come conseguenza logica ciò che emerge è un’immagine dell’uomo come reattore impotente, «un robot, forse costruito e programmato in modo complesso, ma sempre un robot»13.

Trasformazione, cambiamento e, con essi, l’elemento di novità sono tutti aspetti sia della coscienza del sogno sia della coscienza vigile. Per comprendere come essi si realizzino durante lo stato onirico è necessario sostituire le speculazioni metafisiche con un’analisi più rigorosa dei bisogni psicologici dell’organismo umano dormiente e come l’espressione simbolica di questi bisogni sia influenzata dai mutamenti nel milieu cerebrale durante il sonno. I primi sono legati al contenuto dei sogni, la seconda alla loro forma.

Durante il sonno il cervello funziona diversamente e il nostro sistema psicologico risponde a un diverso input ed è organizzato verso un differente obiettivo comportamentale rispetto allo stato di veglia. Quando vi sono sufficienti cambiamenti quantitativi nel milieu cerebrale, si verifica un mutamento qualitativo che esercita una considerevole influenza restrittiva sul sistema psicologico di articolazione. A questo punto i processi di pensiero sono legati a presentazioni concrete. Durante la veglia il soggetto sano è in grado di compiere processi di pensiero che riflettono eventi prolungati nel tempo attraverso una modalità discorsiva di organizzazione simbolica ma, al tempo stesso, è anche in grado di ricorrere a espressioni concrete per

17

utilizzarle metaforicamente. Il paziente con lesioni cerebrali non può ricorrere né all’astrazione né alla metafora. Può al massimo fare uso di una metafora non intenzionale, o quasimetafora. Il sognatore si trova a metà: non ha perso la capacità di astrazione, ma nel milieu cerebrale si è verificata un’alterazione tale da influenzare il modo in cui giunge all’astrazione e nel quale l’astrazione acquista espressione. Viene costretto in una modalità sensoriale concreta e quindi alla necessità di manipolare le rappresentazioni visive allo scopo di fornire una spiegazione metaforica di uno stato interiore. Ipotizzo che questa necessità abbia origini fisiologiche e non psicologiche. Alle condizioni del sonno, il comportamento non è, e non può essere, diretto al mondo esterno. I canali di input si chiudono e le normali vie motorie sono inibite. La coscienza, sia allo stato vigile sia durante il sonno, non può essere separata dall’attività dell’organismo. L’esistenza di una modalità sensoriale di espressione cosciente in effetti appare appropriata per l’unico sistema a disposizione dell’organismo durante il sonno, cioè il meccanismo di attivazione o sistema reticolare attivatore (che Hernandez Peon14 chiama «sistema di vigilanza»). In questo caso la risposta comportamentale sarebbe interna, sotto forma di un’influenza esercitata sul livello di attivazione.

Al fine di sviluppare questo punto più approfonditamente è necessario sottolineare la stretta relazione dell’esperienza conscia – in un momento preciso – con l’attività in cui l’individuo è impegnato. L’attività nella veglia possiede caratteristiche diverse da quelle nel sonno attivo. Nel primo caso il termine fa riferimento a quel segmento delle pratiche sociali dell’individuo, ad esempio il comportamento che assume in un determinato contesto sociale, che è focalizzato in quel momento. Nel caso del sognatore l’attività ha a che fare con cambiamenti interni o, più precisamente, con il potenziale di cambiamento interno, ossia, la possibilità di passaggio dal sonno attivo allo stato di eccitazione diffusa. Durante la veglia tutti i nuovi stimoli afferenti recano al sistema nervoso centrale un messaggio doppio: uno mediato dal sistema reticolare che provoca il risveglio e l’altro, con effetto informativo,

18

dalle vie sensoriali dirette alla corteccia. Quando il sognatore è sveglio il fattore di attivazione rende possibile un più efficace orientamento sugli aspetti informativi dello stimolo. La duplice portata degli stimoli afferenti si mantiene durante lo stato onirico, ma con due differenze importanti. I dati esperienziali mobilitano una fonte interna di stimoli afferenti e si capovolge l’importanza relativa degli aspetti informativi e di quelli di attivazione. Nello stato onirico gli aspetti informativi servono a sostenere e a modulare il livello di attivazione e, se necessario, a produrre un effetto di eccitazione diffusa. Sicuramente la metafora si presta a tale scopo, grazie alle caratteristiche di vividezza, enfasi, incongruenza e teatralità che la contraddistinguono. L’oscurità della metafora può essere legata alla complessità e al grado di stranezza della situazione rappresentata. Il movimento della metafora è il risultato dei processi per dirigere l’attenzione che vengono avviati una volta verificatasi l’attivazione iniziale. Le sensazioni che emergono in questo momento sono nuove nel senso che durante la veglia non sono state messe bene a fuoco. Esse fungono da processi motivazionali1516 esercitando un effetto ulteriore che rafforza l’eccitazione diffusa. Questo serve a organizzare e a dirigere l’ulteriore cambiamento comportamentale. Il compito del sognatore è quello di esprimere relazioni che non ha mai sperimentato. Gli effetti sensoriali che fluiscono al centro di attivazione utilizzano soprattutto la modalità visiva, mentre questi ultimi attivano ulteriori sistemi motivazionali o sentimenti nuovi.

Quando siamo svegli possiamo anche non dare ascolto ai nostri sentimenti, ma mentre dormiamo non possiamo fare altro che esprimerli, a condizione che il sistema nervoso venga stimolato a sufficienza. Come sottolinea Leeper, le sensazioni sono processi che possono essere scatenati da stimoli leggerissimi; nel caso del sognatore tali stimoli assumono l’aspetto dei residui diurni.

Anche altre caratteristiche delle sensazioni, come sottoclasse di motivi, sono importanti per l’attività onirica. Tra queste figurano:

19

1. I motivi che modificano i processi percettivi, così che essi vengono organizzati in modo da evidenziare efficacemente gli oggetti pertinenti. Gli elementi che appaiono nel sogno vengono selezionati in base alla loro pertinenza, cominciando con un residuo affettivo, riesperito all’inizio del sonno attivo, si intensifica l’attenzione focale su un recente evento significativo, responsabile di questo residuo affettivo.

  1. I motivi avviano l’attività esplorativa. Il sognatore si imbarca in un’esplorazione longitudinale dei dati pertinenti passati.
  2. I motivi agiscono da meccanismo regolatore al servizio dell’omeostasi psicologica. In conseguenza delle sensazioni suscitate all’inizio dell’attività onirica, ulteriormente sviluppate con i dati esperienziali pertinenti, il sognatore si muove verso la risoluzione di qualunque disequilibrio psicologico risultante, o facendo appello alle proprio difese o utilizzando creativamente le risorse positive e il potenziale di crescita.

L’uso della metafora. Nelle condizioni di sonno attivo la modalità metaforica concreta è tipica di tale traduzione delle reazioni sperimentate nell’esperienza conscia. È in questo senso che il sogno è una metafora in movimento. Come detto sopra il sognatore deve cercare di capire i dati nuovi. I residui diurni servono da meccanismo scatenante per il materiale onirico proprio perché vengono vissuti come un fioco raggio di luce su un terreno oscuro, ignoto e, a volte, piuttosto terrificante. Esplorare questo territorio – cioè la capacità di intraprendere il nuovo – richiede capacità di astrazione. Il sognatore, obbligato a impiegare una modalità sensoriale, deve costruire l’astrazione partendo da blocchi concreti sotto forma di sequenze visive. La metafora che ne risulta può essere vista come il fenomeno di interfaccia in cui il sistema biologico attribuisce a un medium sensoriale il ruolo di veicolo per questa espressione, mentre il sistema psicologico fornisce il contenuto specifico.

20

Per comprendere pienamente la necessità di espressione metaforica durante le fasi del sonno attivo è necessario introdurre il concetto di vigilanza sociale. Questo concetto comporta un’esplorazione e un orientamento verso quegli eventi che si ripercuotono sull’organismo umano in una maniera nuova e, quindi, in grado di influenzare o cambiare il livello attuale di omeostasi sociale. Per l’organismo umano questo genere di eventi tende ad assumere una forma mediata e simbolica anziché la forma immediata e fisicamente intrusiva che caratterizza le operazioni di vigilanza degli animali inferiori. L’equilibrio dell’individuo viene alterato da tale evento in due modi possibili: uno consiste nello svelare un’area oscura che in seguito stimola la crescita e la capacità di controllo; il secondo consiste nel mettere a nudo un’area di vulnerabilità psichica e in questo caso gli sforzi per la capacità di controllo sono talora ostacolati dalle operazioni di difesa, con il risultato che spiegazioni false o mitizzate finiscono per dare una particolare tonalità o, addirittura, forma al quadro.

La teoria della vigilanza può essere collegata all’attività onirica immaginando che il sonno attivo sia provocato da un meccanismo interno regolato fisiologicamente che, durante la notte, fornisce più volte all’organismo la possibilità di elaborare dati interni o esterni in modo che il risveglio possa verificarsi, se necessario, aggirando le principali variazioni cicliche e graduali delle fasi del sonno. Facendo ciò l’organismo probabilmente ricorre a un meccanismo che in origine forse era legato alle operazioni dello stato di vigilanza.

La condizione essenziale di un meccanismo di vigilanza funzionale, come attesta la sopravvivenza degli animali inferiori, sta nella sua effettiva veridicità. Se l’informazione trasmessa è falsa o interpretata in modo non adeguato, il pericolo aumenta. Lo stesso accade al sognatore. Questi non è alla mercé di forze istintuali più profonde che cercano di acquistare espressione per appagare un desiderio infantile, ma sogna piuttosto aspetti più veri e comprensivi della propria esistenza, in quanto svelata da un

21

evento recente nella vita del sognatore. Egli cerca risposte a domande esistenziali come: «Chi sono? Cosa mi succede? Cosa posso farci?» il sognatore si sforza attivamente di riflettere nella coscienza gli aspetti immediati della propria esistenza. Il sogno nella sua totalità è un’esplicitazione metaforica di una circostanza di vita, esplorata nelle sue implicazioni più profonde per il presente. Vedere il sogno come strategia elaborata per appagare un desiderio significa limitare l’importanza a un motivo in particolare, a scapito delle altre operazioni, travolgenti, lungimiranti, esplorative e rischiose che si verificano. I residui diurni, che riappaiono nei sogni, mettono l’individuo di fronte a nuovi dati per lui significativi o impongono un confronto con le conseguenze finora involontarie e non riconosciute del proprio comportamento. Segue un’esplorazione in profondità in cui la questione immediata polarizza i dati pertinenti da tutti i livelli del proprio passato nel tentativo sia di esplorare le implicazioni dell’evento intrusivo sia di arrivare a una soluzione. Ciò che è inconscio nelle rappresentazioni del sogno sono gli aspetti delle risposte individuali debitamente concettualizzabili, o perché finora non sono state concettualizzate personalmente, o perché derivano da relazioni sociali che non sono state comprese e pertanto non concettualizzabili. Quando l’inconscio o sociale acquista espressione nel sogno, questo avviene tramite un linguaggio idiomorfo e tramite una metafora che, a seconda della capacità dell’individuo, sarà più o meno appropriata per descrivere ciò che prova.

I due brevi esempi che seguono illustrano i punti presi in esame.

ESEMPIO 1. Un architetto, con tendenze schizoidi, era sotto pressione poiché doveva terminare una serie di disegni in tempo per rispettare una scadenza. È stato costretto a dedicarvi quattro domeniche consecutive. Ha dovuto isolarsi dalla moglie e dai quattro figli. Per le prime tre domeniche la moglie ha sopportato questa situazione, ma la quarta era nervosa e irascibile. Il marito era rimasto chiuso tutto il giorno nel suo studio. Egli era vagamente consapevole dei sentimenti della moglie e ogni tanto la sentiva arrabbiarsi con i figli. Si è addormentato per qualche minuto e ha fatto questo sogno:

22

«Chiamavo l’ufficio meteorologico per sapere se era previsto che l’uragano si abbattesse quel pomeriggio sulla città. Mentre chiedevo l’informazione ho iniziato a sentirmi a disagio e in colpa. Mi sono svegliato mentre cercavo di troncare la telefonata».

Si è svegliato con in mente il sogno. Le associazioni con il sogno erano le seguenti:

Provava un crescente senso di disagio causato dal carico di lavoro a cui stava sottoponendo la moglie, tuttavia credeva che fosse necessario e inevitabile. Egli associava la metafora dell’uragano ai ricorrenti scatti d’ira della moglie, soprattutto in considerazione del fatto che se fosse venuto un uragano davvero, il suo nome sarebbe iniziato con la prima lettera del nome della moglie. L’evento accidentale che aveva provocato il sogno era il rumore occasionale delle sgridate della moglie ai figli che gli giungevano alle orecchie mentre era completamente immerso nel lavoro. La contraddizione, intensificata e portata quasi alla totale consapevolezza, aveva origine dalla discrepanza tra la vera natura della sua attività da una parte – la maniera assoluta e arbitraria con cui si isolava dalla famiglia quando era sotto pressione – e il modo in cui tale attività era riflessa nella coscienza: questa era semplicemente una parentesi necessaria, ma temporanea, della sua vita famigliare che gli altri dovevano sopportare. Le reazioni della moglie, legate alla vera natura della sua attività effettiva, e non a come lui se l’era immaginata gli causavano un senso di disagio. Era la prima espressione nella coscienza della crescente consapevolezza della propria responsabilità. Il disagio è emerso in rapporto alle proteste reali, sebbene indirette, della moglie. La razionalizzazione da lui operata doveva cedere di fronte a una riflessione più accurata dell’intera situazione: anche se il lavoro lo metteva sotto pressione, il distacco assoluto dai suoi famigliari, nel disinteresse totale dei loro bisogni, non era giustificabile.

ESEMPIO 2. Un elegante uomo di sessantatré anni che da alcuni mesi soffriva di depressione, raccontò un sogno ricorrente dopo la sua prima seduta:

23

«Ero l’ultimo uomo sulla terra. Non era rimasto nessuno. Mi sono ritrovato solo. Questo mi ha fatto svegliare. Ero molto felice di potermi alzare e di andare a lavorare».

Questo paziente era venuto da me in un momento in cui tutte le sue attività si erano ridotte nettamente e in cui era diventato fobico anche solo all’idea di uscire da casa. Aveva in effetti verbalizzato la speranza di potere tornare al lavoro. Sembrava avere bisogno di un intervento e di un sostegno attivo da parte di un’autorità esterna per affrontare il rischio di ritornare al mondo degli uomini e a quello degli affari. Aveva fatto questo sogno in un momento in cui si sentiva meglio, in séguito alla prima seduta e al tentativo riuscito di impegnarsi per tornare al lavoro. Nel momento in cui iniziava a uscire dalla depressione è riuscito a creare un’immagine che descriveva sia l’apice dell’isolamento disperato dal resto dell’umanità e, al tempo stesso, un’immagine che si prestava a un troncamento improvviso, grazie al semplice processo del risveglio. La metafora minore esprime un sentimento inesorabile, estremamente disperato, di separazione dal resto dell’umanità. Al fine di cogliere la metafora maggiore è necessario prendere in considerazione l’effetto comportamentale del sogno, ossia il risveglio, e con quest’ultimo il mutamento della disperazione nel suo opposto. In realtà sta dicendo: «ora accetto la mia malattia come se fosse un brutto sogno da cui ci si può svegliare con sollievo».

Finora abbiamo fornito pochi elementi sulle leggi che regolano il movimento e lo sviluppo della metafora globale o maggiore del sogno. Probabilmente la descrizione completa degli aspetti evolutivi del processo onirico dovrà attendere ulteriori indagini, utilizzando le nuove tecniche di monitoraggio disponibili. A livello descrittivo il sogno si evolve da metafora introduttiva o di presentazione estendendo la propria portata in senso orizzontale attraverso l’elaborazione del processo motivazionale implicato, o a cui fa allusione, nell’introduzione, ed estendendo il proprio spazio in senso longitudinale introducendo processi motivazionali correlati, derivanti dall’esperienza passata. Lo sviluppo non è casuale ma organizzato, vengono

24

inoltre compiuti dei tentativi di reintegrazione i quali determinano una risoluzione che in termini di intensità affettiva è, o non è, compatibile con i normali parametri temporali della fase di sonno attivo in cui si verifica. È possibile verificare tali idee in maniera sperimentale esaminando sistematicamente la relazione delle immagini ipnagogiche con le sequenze oniriche della stessa notte. L’immagine ipnagogica è solo il primo passo dell’attività onirica, cioè la traduzione dell’ultimo frammento ricordato dei dati cognitivi in immagine visiva? Manca forse di sviluppo successivo e arricchimento rimanendo come «forme fruste» del sogno poiché il periodo di attivazione della corteccia, necessario per produrre un sogno è di natura troppo breve durante la discesa iniziale verso il sonno profondo? Un confronto tra i due fenomeni mette in luce la mancanza nell’immagine ipnagogica degli aspetti evolutivi che caratterizza il sogno. Quest’ultimo al confronto tende ad essere più complesso, dinamico ed evocativo del passato e più incline ad andare oltre l’immediato contenuto precedente della coscienza. Nel sogno la traduzione iniziale è il punto di partenza di un processo esplorativo e attivo che si estende per tutto il periodo di sonno attivo. Un’ulteriore differenza riguarda l’effetto comportamentale. È raro che l’attivazione completa sia conseguenza di immagini ipnagogiche, ma non è raro che avvenga durante il sogno. È forse possibile paragonare l’immagine ipnagogica a una parola che, per quanto unica e multicolore, non può essere messa a confronto, in termini di ricchezza e potenziale espressivo, con la frase totalmente sviluppata.

La mistica del sogno. La mancata percezione di quanto sia significativo il ruolo espositivo della metafora nella coscienza del sogno ha avuto numerose conseguenze infelici per quanto riguarda la teoria e la pratica della psicoterapia. Dal momento che la natura enigmatica e misteriosa del sogno è stata equiparata a tentativi inconsci ma mirati di autoinganno, la psicologia istintivista ne ha avuto un forte sostegno. L’insieme delle complesse relazioni dell’individuo con il proprio ambiente sociale si riduce a conflitti

25

intrapsichici, volti a dominare e controllare la propria biologia. Chein, a proposito di questa visione distorta dell’uomo, scrive: «Gli psicologi contemporanei, a mio parere, tendono ad essere piuttosto ossessionati dalla corporeità dell’uomo e a essere costantemente spinti lontano dall’essere umano e vicini al corpo umano». Osserva inoltre: «L’enfasi posta sulla corporeità come qualità essenziale dell’uomo è certamente evidente nell’ingenuo tentativo – se persistente – di ridurre i processi psicologici a processi fisici. Ancora una volta la filosofia vuole imporsi sulla teoria psicologica.

Tale punto di vista dell’uomo e del sogno come specchio della lotta tra il desiderio istintivo e i divieti sociali ha avuto un effetto fortemente limitante sulla potenziale applicazione terapeutica dell’interpretazione dei sogni. La relazione tra l’attività onirica e l’interpretazione dei sogni, è stata costretta in modo piuttosto inappropriato e inadeguato, all’interno di un modello medico fisso. Il prodotto finale assomigliava più che altro alla relazione tra un paziente, il suo battito cardiaco rivelato nell’elettrocardiogramma, e il medico che possiede la conoscenza specifica per interpretarlo. Nel caso del sogno, un fenomeno universale viene affrontato come se anch’esso fosse uno speciale tracciato, che solamente un esperto è in grado di decifrare. Pur ammettendo che gli approcci naturalistici, intuitivi o di senso comune possano in qualche modo essere fuoristrada, l’arte dell’interpretazione dei sogni è ormai troppo coperta da una corazza tecnologica, più adatta a mantenere il divario fra il significato apparente e quello effettivo, che a colmarlo. I problemi cruciali e di demarcazione prendono forma intorno alla questione di come venga considerata la qualità metaforica.

Nel sogno l’immagine visiva e il referente sono collegati dall’elemento della somiglianza: di qui la qualità metaforica. La concezione qui espressa è che questa traduzione ha lo stesso fine espressivo del discorso figurativo allo stato vigile. L’altra concezione, tradizionale, minimizza l’importanza della relazione metaforica tra referente e immagine e tratta l’immagine tenendo

26

conto quasi esclusivamente della sua relazione associativa con sesso o aggressività. Come sottolinea Bertanlaffy17, gli elementi onirici, in senso freudiano, non sono veri e propri simboli ma piuttosto quello che definisce «associazioni libere». Ogni elemento, in virtù di certe caratteristiche formali, sta per qualcos’altro. Qui «sta per» trasmette un significato opposto a metafora, cioè quello di celare, nascondere, occultare. Il risultato di quest’ultima concezione è stata l’evoluzione di una mistica del sogno in cui l’interpretazione dei sogni diventa strumento specialistico in mano a pochi, con moltissime riserve, gran parte delle quali sottolineano i pericoli dell’interpretazione da parte di inesperti e dell’interpretazione profonda. Ne è risultato che tutti, tranne psicoanalisti, medici con formazione analitica e psicologi, abbandonano qualunque pretesa di utilizzare i sogni. In queste circostanze il sogno, come potenziale strumento per conoscere sé stessi, è poco diffuso Un aspetto di noi stessi che, in modo sottile e marcato, sottolinea il cambio le dinamiche evolutive e l’interazione creativa tra vecchi modelli e le risposte nuove, rimane uno strumento raffinato in mano a pochi anziché essere un medium sviluppato e largamente utilizzato per capire sé stessi.

Sommario

Il sogno è stato descritto come una comunicazione interiore data dalla rapida sovrapposizione di immagini che cambiano di continuo allo scopo di esprimere e analizzare le necessità della vigilanza dell’organismo umano dormiente. Le immagini visive si fondono producendo un effetto metaforico che possiede le caratteristiche specifiche della metafora e che facilita il processo di autoconfronto in atto. In queste condizioni, in cui l’effetto comportamentale implica l’alterazione di uno stato interiore, i processi di pensiero hanno le caratteristiche formali tipiche dei sogni. È pensiero in una

modalità sensoriale poiché è proprio l’effetto sensoriale ciò di cui ha bisogno.

27

Abbiamo inoltre ipotizzato che le operazioni cognitive si verificano a servizio della vigilanza, termine che utilizziamo per denotare le possibili minacce o interferenze con i sistemi simbolici e di valore che legano l’organismo al proprio ambiente sociale. Le sensazioni suscitate all’inizio del sonno attivo hanno le caratteristiche dei processi motivazionali e in questo modo possono avere un effetto energizzante, organizzativo e di attivazione (arousal). Il sognatore è costretto ad esaminare questi elementi intrusivi, sia a livello dei legami che essi hanno col passato sia a livello delle implicazioni che avranno in futuro. L’artificio della metafora e l’assenza di rumori di sottofondo sottolineano la novità e la dimensionalità del problema. Ogni elemento onirico, così come il sogno nel suo complesso, possiede una qualità metaforica. Possiamo forse parlare di metafore all’interno di metafore.

Un grosso passo è stato compiuto verso l’inserimento dell’impotenza all’interno del sistema simbolico, quando la teoria psicoanalitica ha collegato la difficoltà di comprendere i sogni all’atto volontario di mascheramento. L’autoinganno diventa la tecnica più conveniente per soddisfare le proprie necessità. Gli impulsi derivati sono in qualche modo manipolati per non essere scoperti e al tempo stesso per acquistare espressione. In realtà le esigenze e i motivi evocati non esistono, lasciando così il sognatore senza alcuna alternativa se non quella di combattere le stesse vecchie battaglie in un’infinità di modi possibili. La teoria gli fornisce anche dei paraocchi interni che gli impediscono di identificare correttamente la relazione fra la propria difficoltà e il disordine in un ambiente sociale dove spesso le esigenze dell’individuo sono subordinate ai rapporti di forza. È il nuovo, le implicazioni del nuovo e la risoluzione del nuovo a preoccupare il sognatore ed è questa preoccupazione che rende la metafora il mezzo naturale che permette al nuovo di acquistare espressione. La modalità metaforica infatti costringe il sognatore a correre il rischio di affermare qualcosa di nuovo riguardo a sé stesso. Nella misura in cui una metafora colorisce una metafora

28

non letta né compresa, il suo potere di incrementare l’autoconsapevolezza svanisce.

Bibliografia

1 Ullman, M.: Dreams and Arousal, Amer J Psychoter 12:222-242 (April) 1958. 2 Ullman, M.: Dreams and the Therapeutic Process, Psychiatry 21:123-181 (May) 1968.
3 Ullman, M.: The Adaptive Significance of the Dream, J Nerv Ment Dis 129:2 (Aug) 1959.

4 Ullman, M.: The Social Roots of the Dream, Amer J Psychoanal 20:2, 1960.
5 Brown, R.: Words and things, New York: The Free Press of Glencoe, Inc., 1958 p. 211.
6 Langer, S.K.: Philosophy in a New Key, New York: Penguin Books, Inc., 1948, p 121.
7 Langer, S.K.: Problems of Art, New York: Charles Scribner’a Sons, 1957, p 104. 8 Dement, W,C.: “Experimental Dream Studies,” In Masserman, J. (ed.): Science and Psychoanalysis, New York: Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1964, vol 3.
9 Boss, M.: The Analysis of Dreams, New York: Philosophical Library, Inc., 1967.
10 Tauber, E-S., and Green, M.R.: Prelogical Experience, New York: Basic Books, Inc., Publishers, 1959.
11 Fromm, E.: The Forgotten Language, New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc., 1951.
12 Altahuler, K.Z.: Comments on Recent Sleep Research Related to Psychoanalytic Theory, Arch Gen Psychiat 15:235-269 (Sept) 1966.
13 Chein, I.: The Image of Man, J Soc Issues 31:3-20 (Oct) 1962.
14 Hernandez-Peon, R.: A Neurophysiologic Model of Dreams and Hallucinations, J Nerv Merit Dis 141:6, 1966.
15 Leeper, R.W., and Madison, P.: Toward Understanding Human Personalities, New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1959.
16 Leeper, R.W.: “Some Needed Developments in the Motivational Theory of Emotions,” in Levine, D. (ed.); Nebraska Symposium on Motivation; 1965, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1965.
17 Bertalanffy, L.: “On the Definition of the Symbol,” in Royce, J.R. (ed.): Psychology and the Symbol, New York: Random House, Inc., 1965.

1 Ullman, M.: Dreams and Arousal, Amer J psychoter 12:222.242 (April) 1958.
2 Ullman, M: Dreams and the Theraupetic Process, Psychiatry 21:123-181 (May) 1968.
3 Ullman, M.: The Adaptive Significance of the Dream, J Nerv Ment Dis 129:2 (Aug) 1959.

29

4 Ullman, M.: The Social Roots of the Dream, Amer J Psychoanal 20:2, 1960.

5 Brown, R.: Words and Things, New York: The Free Press of Glencoe, Inc.,

1958 p.211.

6 Langer, S.K.: Philosophy in a New Key, New York: Penguin Books, Inc., 1948,

p 121.

7 Langer, S.K.: Problems of Art, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1957, p 104.

8 Dement, W.C.: “Experimental Dream Studies,” In Masserman, J. (ed.):

Science and Psychoanalysis, New York: Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1964, vol 3.

9 Boss, M,: The Analysis of Dreams, New York: Philosophical Library, Inc.,

1967.

10 Tauber, E-S., and Green, M.R.: Prelogical Experience, New York: Basic

Books, Inc., Publishers, 1959.

11 Fromm, E.: The Forgotten Language, New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston,

Inc., Publishers, 1959.

12 Altahuler, K.Z.: Comments on Recent Sleep Research Related to

Psychoanalytic Theory, Arch Gen Psychiat 15:235-269 (Sept)1966.

13 Chein, L: The Image of Man, J Soc Issues 31:3-20 (Oct) 1962.

Hernandez-Peon, R.: A Neurophysiologic Model of Dreams and Hallucinations, J Nerv Merit Dis 141:6, 1966.
15 Leeper, R.W., and Madison, P.: Toward Understanding Human Personalities, New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1959.
16 Laeper, R.W.: “Some Needed Developments in the Motivational Theory of Emotions,” in Levine, D. (ed.); Nebraska Symposium on Motivation; 1965, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1965.
17 Bertalanffy, L.: “On the Definition of the Symbol,” in Royce, J.R. (ed.): Psychology and the Symbol, New York: Random House, Inc., 1965.

14

30

VALERIA SANNA Peircean Reflections on Psychotic Discourse Riflessioni peirciane sul discorso psicotico James Phillips

Peircean Reflections on Pyschotic Discourse Riflessioni peirciane sul discorso psicotico

VALERIA SANNA

Université Marc Bloch
Institut de Traducteurs d’Interprètes et de Relations Internationales Scuole Civiche di Milano
Corso di Specializzazione in Traduzione

primo supervisore: professor Bruno OSIMO secondo supervisore: professoressa Anna RUCHAT

Master: Langages, Cultures et Sociétés Mention: Langues et Interculturalité Spécialité: Traduction professionnelle et Interprétation de conférence
Parcours: Traduction littéraire

giugno 2008

© Forum on Psychiatry and the Humanities of the Washington School of Psychiatry 2000

© Valeria Sanna per l’edizione italiana 2008

Abstract

This dissertation consists in the translation from English into Italian of the article Peircean Reflections on Psychotic Discourse by James Phillips, a psychiatrist from Connecticut. The research focuses on Peirce’s most general notions concerning thought and sign. Particular attention is dedicated to psychotic patients who – in their relationships both to the world and to the Self – are overwhelmed by the externality of the sign and confound not only sign, object, and interpretant, but also symbols and indexes. The study also focuses on the developmental implications of Peircean semiotic notions, suggesting the need for actual embodiment of the semiotic triad in early development and the failure of the latter in the potential psychotic.

Sommario

Traduzione con testo a fronte………………………………………………………………….. 1 Commento alla traduzione ……………………………………………………………………. 69 1. Descrizione del materiale……………………………………………………………….. 70 2. Testo narrativo versus testo saggistico…………………………………………….. 70 2.1 Il testo narrativo……………………………………………………………………….. 71 2.1.1 Lo stile ……………………………………………………………………………… 71 2.1.2 Il linguaggio ………………………………………………………………………. 72 2.1.3 Elementi del testo narrativo …………………………………………………. 72 2.2 Il testo saggistico ………………………………………………………………….. 73 2.2.2. Il linguaggio ……………………………………………………………………… 74 3. Charles Sanders Peirce e il segno…………………………………………………… 75 3.1 Icona ……………………………………………………………………………………… 77 3.2 Indice……………………………………………………………………………………… 77 3.3 Simbolo ………………………………………………………………………………….. 77 4. Lo psicotico e il segno……………………………………………………………………. 78 5. Il traduttore e il segno ……………………………………………………………………. 80 6. Analisi del prototesto …………………………………………………………………….. 81 7. La strategia traduttiva ……………………………………………………………………. 82 8. I problemi traduttivi ……………………………………………………………………….. 83 8.1 Capire prima di tradurre ……………………………………………………………. 83 8.2 Il linguaggio appropriato ……………………………………………………………. 84 8.2.1 Speech, language, e discourse ……………………………………………. 85 8.2.2 Thing e Object …………………………………………………………………… 87 8.3. Eleganza formale versus aderenza all’originale …………………………… 87 8.4 Le citazioni ……………………………………………………………………………… 88 8.4.1 Alcune traduzioni a confronto ………………………………………………. 89 9. Interventi redazionali……………………………………………………………………… 92 9.1 Le citazioni di Peirce ……………………………………………………………….. 93 9.2 Un’ulteriore precisazione…………………………………………………………… 94 Riferimenti bibliografici …………………………………………………………………………. 95

Traduzione con testo a fronte

Peircean Reflections on Psychotic Discourse

It is common knowledge among readers of Peirce that his goal was to develop a general semiotics at a level of abstraction that went well beyond the domain of human psychology. Drawing his semiotic theory back into the territory of human behaviour and speech is thus clearly moving in a direction that was not Peirce’s primary concern. It is in recognition of this discordance that the current effort to apply Peircean notions to an understanding of psychotic discourse is carried out. That such an application is not where Peirce’s interest lay does not in itself gainsay the possibility and potential value of the application.

This Peircean reflection on psychosis will proceed on two levels. The first will be that of Peirce’s most general notions regarding the mind and the semiotic process. At this level, what may be said of Peirce might also be said of many other semioticians, with due acknowledgement that Peirce said most of it first. The treatment of semiotics and psychosis at this level will break into two sections dealing with the world and the self in psychosis. At a further level we then enter into the specifics of Peirce’s semiotic theory, particularly his notion of the sign as a triadic entity. At this level our discussion will move from general semiotic principles to uniquely Peircean semiotics. Finally, we will end with some suggestions concerning a Peircean contribution to developmental issues in psychosis.

Three further introductory remarks need to be made. First, this chapter is in no way intended to present a comprehensive theory or understanding of schizophrenia and the other psychotic disorders. It is intended rather to suggest what Peircean semiotics might offer for such theory or understanding. Second (and related to the first remark), with the exception of some suggestions regarding psychological development in the final section, the chapter avoids issues of etiology and remains closer to the form of psychotic process. The semiotic distortions found in psychosis may indeed be present regardless of the etiology of the particular condition.

2

Riflessioni peirciane sul discorso psicotico

È noto a tutti i lettori di Peirce che il suo scopo era sviluppare una semiotica generale a un livello di astrazione che andasse ben oltre il campo della psicologia umana. Riportare la sua teoria semiotica sul territorio del discorso e del comportamento umano significa quindi spostarsi chiaramente in una direzione che non era la principale preoccupazione di Peirce. È sulla base di questa discordanza che al momento si porta avanti lo sforzo di applicare i concetti peirciani alla comprensione del discorso psicotico. Che una tale applicazione non rappresenti il centro dell’interesse di Peirce, non contraddice di per sé la possibilità di questa applicazione né il suo valore potenziale.

Questa riflessione peirciana sulla psicosi procede a due livelli. Il primo riguarda i concetti più generali di Peirce sulla mente e sul processo semiotico. A questo livello ciò che si può dire di Peirce si potrebbe dire anche di molti altri semiotici, con il dovuto riconoscimento a Peirce per aver sostenuto la maggior parte delle cose per primo. La sezione riguardante semiotica e psicosi a questo livello si divide in due paragrafi che trattano il mondo e il Sé nella psicosi. A un livello successivo entrerò quindi nel dettaglio della teoria semiotica di Peirce, in particolare del suo concetto di «segno» come entità triadica. A questo livello, la discussione si allontana dai princìpi generali della semiotica per concentrarsi nello specifico sulla semiotica di Peirce. Esporrò infine alcune ipotesi riguardanti il contributo di Peirce alle questioni evolutive nella psicosi.

Sono tuttavia necessarie tre ulteriori precisazioni introduttive. Primo: questo capitolo non intende in nessun modo presentare una teoria esaustiva e comprensiva della schizofrenia e degli altri disturbi psicotici; intende piuttosto dare un’idea di cosa potrebbe offrire la semiotica di Peirce a una tale teoria o concezione. Secondo (e collegato al primo punto): a eccezione di alcune ipotesi nella sezione finale riguardanti lo sviluppo psicologico, l’articolo evita questioni di eziologia e resta più vicino alla forma del processo psicotico. Di fatto, le distorsioni semiotiche che si trovano nella psicosi possono essere presenti a prescindere dell’eziologia di questa condizione particolare.

3

Third and finally, this chapter ignores the differentiation of the various psychotic conditions. I attempt to look at the semiotic dimensions of psychotic thinking in general, not, for instance, of schizophrenic thinking versus manic psychotic thinking. Indeed, current research points to the nonspecificity of the thought disorders of the various psychotic conditions (Harrow and Quinlan 1985).

Sign and Psychosis

As just indicated, a first level of reflection addresses Peirce’s most general statements regarding semiosis and the human subject. In a gnomic utterance (for Short, “a dark saying . . .much beloved by semioticists [that] still passes [his] own understanding” [1992, 124]), Peirce declares that man is a sign.

It is sufficient to say that there is no element whatever of man’s consciousness which has not something corresponding to it in the word; and the reason is obvious. It is that the word or sign which man uses is the man himself. For, as the fact that every thought is a sign, taken in conjunction with the fact that life is a train of thought, proves that man is a sign; so, that every thought is an external sign, proves that man is an external sign. That is to say, the man and the external sign are identical, in the same sense in which the words homo and man are identical. Thus my language is the sum total of myself; for the man is the thought. [1868b, 854]

4

Terzo, e ultimo: questo capitolo non tiene conto della distinzione tra le diverse condizioni psicotiche. Cerco di guardare alla dimensione semiotica del pensiero psicotico in generale, e non, per esempio, del pensiero schizofrenico versus il pensiero psicotico maniacale. Questo articolo mostra piuttosto la non specificità dei disturbi del pensiero nelle varie condizioni psicotiche (Harrow e Quinlan 1985).

Segno e psicosi

Come detto, un primo livello di riflessione concerne le affermazioni più generali di Peirce riguardanti la semiosi e il soggetto umano. In una affermazione gnomica (per Short: «una dichiarazione oscura [...] molto amata dai semiotici [che] va tuttora al di là [della sua] comprensione»; 1992:124) Peirce dichiara che l’uomo è un segno.

È sufficiente dire che non vi è alcun elemento della coscienza umana che non abbia qualcosa che gli corrisponda nella parola; e la ragione è ovvia. È che la parola o segno che l’uomo usa è l’uomo stesso. Poiché, come il fatto che ogni pensiero è un segno, considerato insieme al fatto che la vita è una concatenazione di pensieri, prova che l’uomo è un segno; così, [il fatto] che ogni pensiero è un segno esterno prova che l’uomo è un segno esterno. Vale a dire che l’uomo e il segno esterno sono identici, nello stesso senso in cui sono identiche le parole homo e uomo. Il mio linguaggio è pertanto la somma totale di me stesso, poiché l’uomo è il pensiero (1868b: 854)1.

1

It is sufficient to say that there is no element whatever of man’s consciousness which has not something corresponding to it in the word; and the reason is obvious. It is that the word or sign which man uses is the man himself. For, as the fact that every thought is a sign, taken in conjunction with the fact that life is a train of thought, proves that man is a sign; so, that every thought is an external sign, proves that man is an external sign. That is to say, the man and the external sign are identical, in the same sense in which the words homo and man are identical. Thus my language is the sum total for myself; for the man is the though (CP 5.314).

5

At this level we are not yet considering Peirce’s distinctive analysis of the sign as a triadic entity but rather his more global assimilation or identification of mind and semiotic process. The major implication of this identification is that our access to things (and to ourselves) is by way of signs and that we ourselves are this semiotic process. With this assertion Peirce anticipates and joins company with those of our contemporaries who have also emphasized that there is no “thought” or “mind” behind the articulated thoughts.

What is immediately striking about Peirce’s pronouncement that man is a sign is that this is not at all obvious. Indeed, the opposite would seem to be the case. Common sense would declare that we are in immediate contact with things and do not require the mediation of signs. The ordinary condition of signs is thus transparency. As we see through signs to the world, we do not take note of the signs. Paul Ricoeur reminds us of this transparency of signs: “If, with the ancients, and again with the Port-Royal grammarians, the sign is defined as a thing that represents some other thing, then transparency consists in the fact that the sign, in order to represent, tends to fade away and so to be forgotten as a thing” (1992, 41). The same phenomenon is evoked by Maurice Merleau- Ponty in describing the communicative capacity of language: “When someone — an author or a friend — succeeds in expressing himself, the signs are immediately forgotten; all that remains is the meaning. The perfection of language lies in its capacity to pass unnoticed. But therein lies the virtue of language: it is language which propels us toward the things it signifies. In the way it works, language hides itself from us. Its triumph is to efface itself and to take us beyond the words to the author’s very thoughts, so that we imagine we are engaged with him in a wordless meeting of minds” (1973, 10).

6

A questo livello non sto ancora considerando l’analisi specifica peirciana del segno come entità triadica, ma piuttosto la sua più generale assimilazione o identificazione di mente e processo semiotico. Il principale risvolto di tale identificazione consiste nel fatto che il nostro accesso alle cose (e a noi stessi) avviene per mezzo di segni e che noi stessi siamo questo processo semiotico. Con questa affermazione Peirce anticipa il gruppo di quei nostri contemporanei che hanno anche rimarcato che, dietro ai pensieri articolati, non c’è un «pensiero» né una «mente», e si unisce a loro.

Ciò che delle parole di Peirce – il quale dichiara che l’uomo è un segno – colpisce all’istante, è che questo non è affatto ovvio. Anzi, parrebbe vero il contrario. Secondo il senso comune, noi siamo in contatto diretto con le cose, e non ci occorre la mediazione dei segni. La condizione comune dei segni è quindi la trasparenza. Dal momento che noi guardiamo al mondo attraverso i segni, non prestiamo attenzione ai segni. Paul Ricoeur ci richiama alla mente questa trasparenza dei segni:

Se, con gli Antichi e ancora con i grammatici di Port Royal, si definisce il segno come una cosa che rappresenta un’altra cosa, la trasparenza consiste nel fatto che, per rappresentare, il segno tende a scomparire e a farsi, così, dimenticare in quanto cosa (2005:120).

Lo stesso fenomeno è evocato da Maurice Merleau-Ponty quando descrive la capacità comunicativa del linguaggio:

Quando qualcuno – autore o amico – ha saputo esprimersi, i segni vengono subito dimenticati; resta solo il senso, e la perfezione del linguaggio è tale da passare inosservata.
Ma proprio questa è la virtù del linguaggio: è lui a rimandarci a ciò che significa; si dissimula ai nostri occhi con la sua stessa operazione; il suo trionfo è di cancellarsi e di dare accesso, al di là delle parole, al pensiero stesso dell’autore, in modo che, poi, crediamo di esserci intrattenuti con lui senza parole, da mente a mente (1984:38).

7

If the usual fate of signs is to be transparent, to go unnoticed, where does this stop? What are the circumstances in which signs assert their presence? For Peirce they assert their presence when we reflect on the process of thought. As he says in “Questions Concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man”: “If we seek the light of external facts. But we have seen that only by external facts can thought be known at all. The only thought, then, which can possibly be cognized is thought in signs. But thought which cannot be cognized does not exist. All thought, therefore, must necessarily be in signs” (1868a, 24). Others have focused on the varied circumstances in which the sign quality of thought stands out. Ricoeur continues the statement just quoted: “This obliteration of the sign as a thing is never complete, however. There are circumstances in which the sign does not succeed in making itself absent as a thing; by becoming opaque, it attests once more to the fact of being a thing and reveals its eminently paradoxical structure of an entity at once present and absent” (Ricoeur 1992, 41). As examples of the opaqueness of the sign, Ricoeur highlights speech acts in which the fact of utterance is reflected in the sense of the statement.

8

Se, in genere, il destino dei segni è essere trasparenti e passare inosservati, quando non è così? Quali sono le circostanze in cui i segni asseriscono la loro presenza? Secondo Peirce asseriscono la loro presenza quando noi riflettiamo sul processo del pensiero. Come sostiene in Questions Concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man [Questioni concernenti certe pretese facoltà umane]:

Se cerchiamo la luce dei fatti esterni, i soli casi di pensiero che possiamo reperire sono casi di pensiero in segni. È evidente che nessun altro pensiero può essere evidenziato da fatti esterni. Ma abbiamo visto che è possibile comprendere il pensiero soltanto attraverso fatti esterni. Dunque, il solo pensiero che può forse essere conosciuto è il pensiero in segni. Ma il pensiero che non può essere conosciuto non esiste. Ogni pensiero deve pertanto essere necessariamente in segni2.

Altri si sono concentrati sulle svariate circostanze in cui emerge la qualità segnica del pensiero. Prosegue Ricoeur:

Ma questa obliterazione del segno in quanto cosa non è mai completa. Ci sono circostanze in cui il segno non riesce a rendersi tanto assente; opacizzandosi, esso si attesta nuovamente come cosa e rivela la sua struttura eminentemente paradossale di entità presente-assente (2005:121).

Come esempi di opacità del segno, Ricoeur porta gli atti discorsuali in cui nel senso dell’enunciazione si riflette il fatto stesso che è un’affermazione.

2

If we seek the light of external facts, the only cases of thought which we can find are of thought in signs. Plainly, no other thought can be evidenced by external facts. But we have seen that only by external facts can thought be known at all. The only thought, then, which can possibly be cognized is thought in signs. But thought which cannot be cognized does not exist. All thought, therefore, must necessarily be in signs (CP 5.251).

9

Thus, when the statement, “the cat is on the mat” is replaced by “I affirm that the cat is on the mat,” the sign-making “I” of the second version obtrudes itself on the transparency of the first.

For his part, Merleau-Ponty finds the opaqueness of the sign exposed in poetic language (and even more in painting), with its curious admixture of transparency, mediation, and opacity (1973, 9 – 46). In the same vein, Jakobson emphasizes that poetry as such foregoes direct referentiality in the service of lingering over the word-signs that comprise the poem (quoted in Ricoeur, 1978, 150). And, as is well known, in a movement that extends from Mallarmé to Derrida, the independence of the text from even a necessary indirect referentiality has resulted in an acute focus on the sign status of the text. In Steiner’s words, “This move is first declared in Mallarmé’s disjunction of language from external reference and in Rimbaud’s deconstruction of the first person singular. These two proceedings, and all that they entail, splinter the foundations of the Hebraic-Hellenic-Cartesian edifice in which the ratio and psychology of the Western communicative tradition had lodged” (1989, 94 – Se, 95). Finally, in certain poets we find a direct thematizing of the process of poetizing — the use of signs to muse over the use of signs. Thus, for instance, in “The Man with the Blue Guitar,” Wallace Stevens writes,

10

Quindi, quando la frase «il gatto è sullo zerbino» è sostituita da «io affermo che il gatto è sullo zerbino», l’«io» della seconda versione, che diventa un segno, s’impone sulla trasparenza della prima.

Dal canto suo, Merleau-Ponty trova esposta l’opacità del segno all’interno del linguaggio poetico (e ancora di più nella pittura), con la sua curiosa mescolanza di trasparenza, mediazione e opacità (1984:37-67). Allo stesso modo Jakobson sottolinea che la poesia, in quanto tale, rinuncia alla referenzialità diretta per soffermarsi sulle parole-segno di cui consiste il componimento poetico (citato in Ricoeur 1978:150). Inoltre, come è ben noto, in un movimento che si estende da Mallarmé a Derrida, l’indipendenza del testo è passata da una referenzialità anche solo indiretta necessaria, a una focalizzazione intensiva sullo stato del segno nel testo. Come sostiene Steiner:

Questa traslazione è dichiarata per la prima volta nella disgiunzione della lingua dal referente esterno di Mallarmé, e nella decostruzione della prima persona singolare da parte di Rimbaud. Questi due procedimenti e tutte le loro implicazioni spaccano le fondamenta dell’edificio ebraico-ellenico-cartesiano in cui risiedevano la ratio e la psicologia della tradizione comunicativa occidentale (1992:97).

Infine, in alcuni poeti troviamo una tematizzazione diretta del processo del poetare – l’uso di segni per riflettere sull’uso di segni. Quindi, per esempio, in L’uomo dalla chitarra azzurra Wallace Stevens scrive:

11

“They said, ‘You have a blue guitar, / You do not play things as they are.’ / The man replied, “Things as they are / Are changed upon the blue guitar.’ / And they said then, ‘ But play, you must, / A tune beyond us, yet ourselves, / A tune upon the blue guitar / Of things exactly as they are’” (1959, 73 – 74). And T. S. Eliot in “Four Quartets” writes, “Trying to learn to use words, and every attempt / Is a wholly new start, and a different kind of failure / Because one has only learnt to get the better of words / For the thing one no longer has to say, or the way in which / One is no longer disposed to say it. And so each venture / Is a new beginning, a raid on the inarticulate imprecision of feeling, / Undisciplined squads of emotion” (1962, 128).

These are all circumstances in which signs call attention to themselves in a productive, reflective manner. And this list of circumstances is hardly complete. Others could be mentioned, but it is time to lead the discussion in another direction, that in which the consciousness of signs betokens a crack in the normal semiotic process. Here we begin to speak of a breakdown of the everyday transparency of signs. For the schizophrenic who becomes acutely aware of his or her own words or gestures as words or gesture, they suddenly reveal their nature as signs — or semiotic things.

12

Gli dissero: «sulla chitarra azzurra / tu non suoni le cose come sono». / Egli disse: «Le cose come sono / si cambiano sulla chitarra azzurra». / Risposero: «Ma tu devi suonare / un’aria che sia noi e ci trascenda, / un’aria sopra la chitarra azzurra / delle cose così come esse sono»3 (1959:29).

E T.S. Eliot in Four Quartets [Quattro quartetti] scrive:

A cercar d’imparare l’uso delle parole, e ogni tentativo / è un rifar tutto da capo, e una specie diversa di fallimento / perché si è imparato a servirsi bene delle parole / soltanto per quello che non si ha più da dire, o nel modo in cui / non si è più disposti a dirlo. E così ogni impresa / è un cominciar di nuovo, un’incursione nel vago / con logori strumenti che peggiorano sempre / nella gran confusione dei sentimenti imprecisi, / squadre indisciplinate di emozioni4 (1986:285).

Queste sono tutte circostanze in cui i segni richiamano su di sé l’attenzione in un modo produttivo e riflessivo. Difficilmente questa lista di circostanze sarà completa. Se ne potrebbero citare altre, ma è tempo di portare la discussione in un’altra direzione, quella in cui la consapevolezza dei segni rappresenta una crepa nel normale processo semiotico. Qui cominciamo a parlare del crollo della trasparenza quotidiana dei segni. Per lo schizofrenico che diventa ben consapevole delle sue parole o dei suoi gesti in quanto parole o gesti, [questi] rivelano improvvisamente la loro natura di segni – o di cose semiotiche.

3

They said, “You have a blue guitar, / You do not play things as they are.” / The man replied, “Things as they are / Are changed upon the blue guitar.” / And they said then, “But play, you must, / A tune beyond us, yet ourselves, / A tune upon the blue guitar / Of things exaclty as they are” (1959:73-74).

4

Trying to learn to use words, and every attempt / Is a wholly new start, and a different kind of failure / Because one has only learnt to get the better of words / For the thing one no longer has to say, or the way in which / One is no longer disposed to say it. And so each venture / Is a new beginning, a raid on the inarticulate / With shabby equipment always deteriorating / In the general mess of imprecision of feeling, / Undisciplined squads of emotion (1962:128).

13

If, according to Peirce, it is the case that “we are in thought, and not that thoughts are in us” (1868b, 42), the schizophrenic is often not only in them, but engulfed by them. If the remarkable fact about semiosis is that thoughts as external signs are things and yet transport us beyond themselves, for the schizophrenic this transport often breaks down, and the patient is confronted with word-things that do not assume their usual function. The patient becomes stuck in them. They no longer transport him or her to the object or the other person. Schizophrenic ambivalence, for instance, which Bleuler attributes to loosening of associations and the attribution of both positive and negative feelings to every situation, may also be understood as a paralysis in the normal semiotic process ([1911] 1950, 53 – 55). Asked to sit on the chair, the patient puzzles, “Chair, what is a chair?” Invited to eat, he pauses over and studies the fork, whose meaning as an implement has ceased to be transparent for him, and he gets caught up in the word-things — fork, food.

For the psychotic, these are not detached reflections or musings on the semiotic understructure of human reality. They are terrifying experiences in which that very structure is breaking down. Certainly the acute anxiety that accompanies psychotic experience is at least in part explained by this collapse of the basic semiotic structuring of human experience. What Freud described as the end-of-the-world experience in psychosis and attributed to a libidinal decathexis of the world (S.E. 12:69 – 71) may thus be reinterpreted from a semiotic perspective. The familiar semiotically structured world is indeed disintegrating.

With the loss of sign transparency in psychosis, the normal semiotic structure of sign, object, and interpretant may be deeply altered. As already suggested, thoughts as sign-things bear a dimension of externality and are not the pure internal presences they are often imagined to be.

14

Se, secondo Peirce, questo è il caso in cui «noi siamo nel pensiero e non [...] i pensieri sono in noi»5, lo schizofrenico spesso non soltanto è dentro loro, ma ne è sommerso. Se l’aspetto notevole della semiosi consiste nel fatto che i pensieri, in quanto segni esterni, sono cose, e tuttavia ci trasportano oltre sé stessi, per lo schizofrenico questo trasporto spesso viene meno, e il paziente si confronta con parole-cose che non svolgono le loro solite funzioni. Il paziente si ritrova incastrato al loro interno. Le parole-cose non lo trasportano più verso l’oggetto né verso l’altra persona. L’ambivalenza schizofrenica, per esempio, che Bleuler attribuisce allo scioglimento delle associazioni, e l’attribuzione di sensazioni positive e negative a ogni situazione, possono essere anche intese come paralisi del normale processo semiotico (1950:53-55). Quando è stato chiesto al paziente di sedersi sulla sedia, il paziente ha risposto disorientato: «Sedia, che cos’è una sedia?». Invitato a mangiare, si sofferma sulla forchetta e la studia; il suo significato di utensile ha cessato di essere trasparente per lui, e viene catturato dalle parole-cose: forchetta, cibo.

Per lo psicotico non si tratta di riflessioni distaccate né meditazioni sulla sottostruttura semiotica della realtà umana, ma di esperienze terrificanti in cui è proprio quella struttura ad andare in crisi. Di certo la forte angoscia che accompagna l’esperienza psicotica è spiegata almeno in parte da questo crollo della struttura semiotica alla base dell’esperienza umana. Quello che Freud descrisse come l’esperienza della fine del mondo nella psicosi e attribuì a un disinvestimento libidico dal mondo (S.E. 12:69-71) può essere quindi reinterpretato da una prospettiva semiotica. Si tratta della disintegrazione del mondo strutturato semioticamente che conosciamo.

Con la perdita della trasparenza del segno nella psicosi può essere profondamente alterata la normale struttura semiotica composta da segno, interpretante, e oggetto. Come già ipotizzato, i pensieri in quanto segni-cose portano una dimensione di esteriorità e non sono pure presenze interne, come spesso le si crede.

5

We are in thought, and not that thoughts are in us (CP 5.289).

15

Peirce emphasized this in the above-cited statement in declaring that man is an external sign (1868b, 854). In psychosis, with the disappearance of normal sign transparency, this externality is taken to its furthest extreme, and the thought- signs are materialized into entities of the external world: voices of others, commands from on high, influencing machines, recording machines in the brain, material objects that convey hidden meanings.

It is at this point that the semiotic account confronts the psychoanalytic understanding of psychosis — that is, as loss of ego boundaries in the earlier writers (e.g., Federn 1953; Freeman, Cameron, and McGhie 1958) and as a fusion of self and object representations in later ones (e.g., Kernberg 1975). The psychoanalytic understanding is based on a separation of the internal and the external — self and object, self-representation and object representation — and the blurring of these. The significant reinterpretation that semiotic theory brings to this account is the externality of the sign. If thought already possesses a dimension of externality, it is a shorter step toward full externalization of the thought. The vulnerability of any subject to psychosis is thus exposed.

Among psychoanalysts the externality of the sign has been most clearly recognized by Lacan, who, with his category of the symbolic order, has been particularly sensitive to the semiotic dimension. Working out of a framework that is both Lacanian and Peircean, Muller has explained the breakdown of normal language use in schizophrenia as a failure to use language in its mediating role between the subject and the unarticulated, unsymbolized world — what Lacan terms the Real.

16

Nell’affermazione citata in precedenza, dichiarando che l’uomo è un segno esterno (1868b:854), Peirce ha enfatizzato questo concetto. Nella psicosi, con la scomparsa della normale trasparenza del segno, questa esteriorità viene portata al suo estremo e il pensiero-segno si materializza in entità del mondo esterno: voci di altri, ordini dall’alto, macchine manipolatrici, registratori nella mente, oggetti materiali che hanno un significato nascosto.

È a questo punto che la concezione semiotica si contrappone alla comprensione psicoanalitica della psicosi – ossia una perdita dei limiti dell’Io nei primi autori (es. Federn 1953; Freeman, Cameron, e McGhie 1958) e la fusione delle rappresentazioni del Sé e dell’oggetto negli autori successivi (es. Kernberg 1975). La concezione psicoanalitica si basa sulla separazione tra ciò che è interno e ciò che è esterno – Sé e oggetto, rappresentazione del Sé e rappresentazione dell’oggetto – e il loro reciproco sconfinamento. La significativa reinterpretazione della concezione semiotica è l’esteriorità del segno. Se il pensiero possiede già una dimensione di esteriorità, è più vicino alla piena esteriorizzazione del pensiero. Si capisce quindi la vulnerabilità dei soggetti psicotici.

Tra gli psicoanalisti chi ha saputo riconoscere al meglio l’esteriorità del segno è stato Lacan che, con la sua categoria dell’ordine simbolico, è stato particolarmente sensibile alla dimensione semiotica. Al di fuori di una cornice sia lacaniana che peirciana, Muller ha spiegato il crollo dell’uso normale della lingua nella schizofrenia come un mancato uso della lingua per il suo ruolo di mediazione tra il soggetto e il mondo inarticolato e non simbolizzato – che Lacan definisce «il Reale».

17

Now what if language does not function as such a recourse against the Real? What if the Real is experienced without the mediation of language? What if words themselves lose their referential context and are experienced as in the Real? To say that words are in the Real is to say that words have become like things: whether they come from the therapist or the titles of books or the “internal tape recorder,” they can strike the patient’s ears, eyes, forehead, chest, like objects. They do not mediate and refer to objects. [1996, 97]

With his understanding of the symbolic order as above, over against, or external to the subject, Lacan offers a unique way of envisioning the externality of the sign. It is thus not surprising that, as Muller explicates, the Lacanian analysis of psychosis emphasizes the thinglike quality of psychotic language.

One patient offers a vivid illustration of the confusion that may occur in connection with the externality of the sign. On the one hand, he is acutely aware of all his mental experiences — thoughts, feelings, sensations, impulses, inclinations — and treats these as external sign-phenomena that have been placed “in” him for some reason. On the other hand, he invests indifferent external communications such as the radio or television with increased and distorted semiotic significance. The internal is thus treated as external and the external as internal. In focusing in this way on this man’s profoundly confused use of signs, we are giving a semiotic account of what in general psychiatry would be called thought insertion and ideas of reference.

Another patient illustrates the way in which the externalization of the thought-sign leads to a deeply altered experience in which the world of indifferent things becomes an inexhaustible reservoir of gesture and meaning. A young man with bipolar disorder would intermittently slip into psychotic thinking in which things everywhere would take on significance. There was not a coherent theme that could be elicited from the abundance of “meanings” and “signs” he would describe. What was paramount was simply that there were signs everywhere.

18

E se la lingua non svolgesse la funzione di riferimento al Reale? E se il Reale fosse percepito senza la mediazione della lingua? E se le parole stesse perdessero il loro contesto referenziale e fossero percepite come nel Reale? Dire che le parole sono nel Reale è dire che le parole sono diventate come delle cose: che vengano da un terapeuta o dal titolo di un libro o dal “registratore mentale” possono colpire l’orecchio del paziente, l’occhio, la fronte, il petto, come degli oggetti. Non mediano né rimandano a oggetti (1996:97).

Con questa concezione dell’ordine simbolico che si riferisce all’oggetto o che gli è esterno, Lacan propone un modo unico di figurarsi l’esteriorità del segno. Non sorprende che, come chiarisce Muller, l’analisi lacaniana della psicosi enfatizzi la cosità del linguaggio psicotico.

Un paziente mostra chiaramente la confusione che può generarsi in caso di esteriorità del segno. Da un lato è ben consapevole delle sue percezioni mentali – pensieri, emozioni, sensazioni, impulsi, inclinazioni – e le tratta come fenomeni-segno esterni che per qualche ragione sono stati posti “in” lui. Dall’altro, investe di significatività accresciuta e distorta comunicazioni esterne ricevute per esempio dalla radio o dalla televisione. L’interno è quindi trattato come esterno, e l’esterno come interno. Concentrarsi così sull’uso profondamente confuso dei segni di quest’uomo descrive, da un punto di vista semiotico, quello che la psichiatria generale chiamerebbe «inserimento di pensieri» e «idee di riferimento».

Un altro paziente mostra come l’esteriorizzazione del pensiero-segno porti a un’esperienza profondamente alterata in cui il mondo delle cose indifferenti diventa una fonte inesauribile di gesti e significati. Un giovane affetto da disturbo bipolare di tanto in tanto scivolava nel pensiero psicotico in cui ovunque cose assumono significato. Non si è presentato un tema coerente che possa essere desunto dall’abbondanza di «significati» e «segni» che ha descritto. La cosa più rilevante consiste semplicemente nel fatto che c’erano segni ovunque.

19

What is suggested in the experiences of such patients is that terror from the collapse of semiotic structure is such that the restitution must involve an overinvestment of the world with meaning.

In this discussion of the severe distortions of normal semiotic processes found in chronic psychoses, one point must be kept in mind. While the usual transparency of signs is abolished in these conditions, this does not generally represent a real self-consciousness of signs on the part of the patient. It is the observer whois made aware of the opacity and externality of signs in the patient’s speech through the latter’s odd use of them. This is of course a way of distinguishing the poet from the psychotic. In both, signs assert their presence and opacity, but it is the former who is in control of this process. That said, we may also acknowledge that the statement is an oversimplification of a more nuanced situation. First, there are the psychotics who are aware of their semiotic transformations; then there are those few, for example, Nerval, who simply cover both categories of poet and psychotic.

In this regard it should be acknowledged that in his recently published Madness and Modernism, Louis Sass has strongly opposed any poet-versus- schizophrenic polarity of the sort I suggest in this chapter. In what he calls “autonomization,” Sass describes a feature of schizophrenic language that is similar to what is being presented here: “A second characteristic of schizophrenic language involves tendencies for language to lose its transparent and subordinate status, to shed its function as a communicative tool and to emerge instead as an independent focus of attention or autonomous source of control over speech and understanding” (1992, 178). Sass does not, however, see this autonomization of language in schizophrenia as qualitatively different from what he calls the “apotheosis of the word” in figures like Mallarmé, Barthes, and Derrida.

20

Ciò che emerge dall’esperienza di questi pazienti è che il terrore derivante dal crollo della struttura semiotica è tale che, per compensare, si deve eccedere nell’investire il mondo di significato.

Nel corso di questa discussione sulle gravi distorsioni del normale processo semiotico individuate nelle psicosi croniche, è necessario tenere a mente una cosa. Anche se in queste condizioni la consueta trasparenza del segno viene meno, di solito ciò non rappresenta una vera metaconsapevolezza dei segni da parte del paziente. È chi osserva a essere consapevole dell’opacità e dell’esteriorità dei segni nel discorso del paziente attraverso l’uso bizzarro che questi ne fa. Di certo è un criterio per distinguere il poeta dallo psicotico. Per entrambi, i segni asseriscono la propria presenza e opacità, ma è solo il primo a riuscire a controllare questo processo. Detto questo, possiamo riconoscere che quest’affermazione è un’ipersemplificazione di una situazione più sfumata. In primo luogo, esistono psicotici che sono consapevoli delle loro trasformazioni semiotiche; poi ci sono quei pochi, per esempio Nerval, che semplicemente rientrano in entrambe le categorie: poeta e psicotico.

A questo proposito è bene ricordare che in Madness and Modernism, di recente pubblicazione, Louis Sass si è opposto con forza a qualsiasi polarità poeta versus schizofrenico del genere che propongo in questo capitolo. In ciò che chiama «autonomizzazione», Sass descrive una caratteristica del linguaggio schizofrenico simile a quella che è qui presentata:

una seconda peculiarità del linguaggio schizofrenico comporta la tendenza della lingua a perdere il suo status di trasparenza e subordinazione, a cedere la sua funzione di strumento di comunicazione ed emergere invece come centro dell’attenzione indipendente o come fonte di controllo autonoma sul discorso e sulla comprensione (1992:178).

Sass, a ogni modo, non considera questa autonomizzazione della lingua nella schizofrenia diversa, da un punto di vista qualitativo, da quella che chiama «apoteosi della parola» in autori come Mallarmé, Barthes e Derrida.

21

Although there are clearly similarities and overlaps between schizophrenic and deconstructionist uses of language, and although, as indicated above, a stark contrast between the two is certainly oversimplified, I would in the end argue that Sass’s argument for a lack o qualitative difference does not do justice to the disturbed, uncontrolled, and anguished quality of schizophrenic language and existence.

Signs of the Self

Thus far we have concentrated on the semiotic restructuring (or “destructuring” of the world in psychosis. Peirce’s semiotic description of the mind was pursued in its implications for how the world is encountered in health and psychosis. The emphasis was on the heightened opacity and externality of the sign in the psychotic’s encounter with the world. We must now shift our focus from the world to the subject itself. The declaration that a person is a sign was above taken to mean that the subject is in contact with a coherent world only by way of signs. But this declaration has a second meaning, namely that the subject relates to him or herself through signs. This is of course the strongly anti- Cartesian bias of Peircean semiotics. There is no direct intuition or vision of the self. While in this section we will again witness the problems inherent in the opacity and the externality of signs — now of the self — the emphasis will fall on the disorder that may follow from the sheer complexity of the range and structure of signs that define a self.

The loss of Cartesian intuition (and with it the loss of the self as substance in the traditional sense) has become a familiar theme in contemporary thought and has had varying consequences.

22

Pur essendoci evidenti somiglianze e sovrapposizioni tra l’uso del linguaggio schizofrenico e quello decostruzionista e, come indicato sopra, nonostante un forte contrasto tra i due usi del linguaggio sia sicuramente ipersemplificante, concluderei sostenendo che la tesi di Sass riguardo alla mancanza di una differenza qualitativa non rende giustizia alla qualità della lingua e non chiarisce come mai il discorso e l’esistenza dello schizofrenico siano disturbati, incontrollati e angosciati.

Segni del Sé

Fino a questo momento mi sono concentrato sulla ristrutturazione (o «destrutturazione») semiotica del mondo nella psicosi. La descrizione semiotica peirciana della mente è stata approfondita nelle sue implicazioni riguardo a come ci si confronta con il mondo in caso di salute e di psicosi. L’enfasi è stata posta sull’aumento dell’opacità e sull’esteriorità del segno nell’incontro dello psicotico con il mondo. È ora necessario spostare l’attenzione dal mondo al soggetto stesso. La dichiarazione secondo la quale una persona è un segno era stata usata in precedenza per indicare che il soggetto è a contatto con un mondo coerente soltanto per mezzo di segni. Questa dichiarazione ha tuttavia un secondo significato e precisamente: il soggetto si rapporta a sé stesso attraverso i segni. Questo è certamente un atteggiamento fortemente anticartesiano della semiotica peirciana. Non c’è un’intuizione diretta o una visione del Sé. Oltre a testimoniare i problemi inerenti all’opacità e all’esteriorità del segno – ora del Sé –, in questa sezione porrò l’enfasi sulla sindrome derivante puramente dalla complessità della gamma e della struttura dei segni che definiscono il Sé.

La perdita dell’intuizione cartesiana (e con essa la perdita del Sé come sostanza nel senso tradizionale) è diventata un tema ricorrente nelle riflessioni contemporanee e ha comportato numerose conseguenze.

23

At the opposite pole from the Cartesian self, in a movement inaugurated by Nietzsche, the loss of the intuited, substantial self has united thinkers from fields as diverse as analytic philosophy, cognitive science, and Buddhism in the conclusion that there is no self. Others, rejecting both the intuited, substantial self of Descartes and the opposite stance of an absence of self, have taken a middle ground, arguing for a self that is real albeit not a substance, a self that can be known not directly but through its effects — and its signs. It is in this company that we will locate Peirce. If his contemporary Nietzsche announced the death of the Cartesian substantial self, it was Peirce who proclaimed the birth of a self that could be known indirectly — the semiotic self.

What is this self that is known through its effects and its signs? This is the self of gender, proper name, age and stage of life, profession, avocation, religion — and further, of relationships, marital status, children, and so forth. If I attempt to know myself through pure introspection, the yield is negligible. But if I take the indirect route and approach myself through the series of signs just mentioned, the yield is considerable. I am male, married, middle aged, a psychiatrist, and so forth. To the argument that none of these signs defines the “real” me, there is only one response: With the loss of belief in substance and intuition, we will accept this modest self of indirection, this self of signs.

In addition to the list of categories that mark a typical life, there are two particular classes of verbal signs that signify an identity. The first is that of the personal pronouns. The individual must be able to indicate him or herself as “I,” and as Benveniste has spelled out, the use of “I” implies both a “you” and the implicit awareness that the “you” is also an “I” for whom I am a “you.” In his words,

24

All’estremo opposto del Sé cartesiano, in un movimento inaugurato da Nietzsche, la perdita del Sé intuìto e sostanziale ha visto concordare pensatori dei più svariati campi, dalla filosofia analitica, alla scienza cognitiva, al buddismo, nella conclusione che non esiste un Sé. Altri, rifiutando sia il Sé intuìto e sostanziale di Cartesio sia la posizione opposta di assenza del Sé, hanno scelto una strada di mezzo, sostenendo l’esistenza di un Sé reale, sebbene non si tratti di una sostanza; un Sé che può essere conosciuto non direttamente ma attraverso i suoi effetti – e i suoi segni. È all’interno di questo gruppo che va collocato Peirce. Se il suo contemporaneo Nietzsche ha annunciato la morte del Sé sostanziale cartesiano, è stato Peirce a proclamare la nascita di un Sé che potesse essere conosciuto indirettamente: il Sé semiotico.

Che cosa è questo Sé che è noto attraverso i suoi effetti e i suoi segni? È il Sé del genere, del nome proprio, dell’età e della fase della vita, della professione, degli hobby, della religione – e poi ancora, delle relazioni, dello stato civile, dei figli e così via. Se cerco di conoscere me stesso attraverso la pura introspezione, ottengo pochi risultati. Se invece intraprendo il percorso indiretto e mi avvicino a me stesso grazie alla serie di segni appena menzionati, i risultati sono notevoli. Sono maschio, sposato, di mezza età, psichiatra, e così via. C’è una sola risposta all’osservazione che nessuno di questi segni definisce il “vero” me, e cioè che con la perdita della convinzione nella sostanza e nell’intuizione accetteremo questo modesto Sé indiretto; questo Sé di segni.

Esistono due particolari classi di segni verbali, che significano identità, da aggiungere alla lista delle categorie che definiscono una vita tipica. La prima è quella dei pronomi personali. L’individuo deve essere in grado di indicare sé stesso come «io» e, come ha dichiarato Benveniste, l’uso [del pronome] «io» implica sia un «tu» sia l’implicita consapevolezza che anche il «tu» è un «io» per il quale io sono un «tu». Queste le sue parole:

25

“The consciousness of oneself is possible only if it is experienced by contrast. I only employ I in addressing someone else, who will be in my allocution a you. It is this condition of dialogue that is constitutive of the person, for it implies a reciprocity in which I become you in the allocution of the other who in his turn designates himself by I” (1966, 260). Benveniste also points out that the use of personal pronouns is always accompanied by deictic indicators that locate the speaker in space and time (253). As in the above analysis, these personal pronouns, as well the deictic indicators surrounding them, enjoy a large degree of transparency. We are generally not conscious of the sign in quality of “I,” “you,” “here,” “now,” and so forth.

The second class of self-signifying signs consists of those terms that indicate the material-psychic balance of the human person, the sense of the person as a matter and spirit, or body and mind, or as an embodied consciousness. With this class we see a predominance of metaphorical locutions. Since we do not have an adequate language of soul or mind — of our inner states — we borrow categories of the world and of our bodies to express the psychological side of our existence. For instance, Lakoff and Johnson, in a work that develops this use of metaphor in great detail, describe the use of orientation (e.g., “I’m feeling up”) and entity (e.g., “My mind isn’t operating today”) metaphors — that is, aspects of the material world — to describe states of the mental or psychic world (1980, 14, 27).

To complete this picture of a self known indirectly through its signs, we must add a final dimension to the categories of signs as just described: that of the narrative self, the self as evolved over a lifetime, with a past, present, and future.Narrativity brings to the self the dimensions of temporality and memory, and the integration of these into the more-or-less coherent story of a single destiny. Each of the categories finds its place in the life narrative: the child grows into the adult, chooses and develops in a particular profession, forms relationships and a family, and so forth.

26

La coscienza di sé è possibile solo per contrasto. Io non uso io se non rivolgendomi a qualcuno, che nella mia allocuzione sarà un tu. È questa condizione di dialogo che è costitutiva della persona, poiché implica reciprocamente che io divenga tu nell’allocuzione di chi a sua volta si designa con io (1994:312).

Benveniste precisa inoltre che l’uso dei pronomi personali è sempre accompagnato dai deittici che localizzano nel tempo e nello spazio chi parla (303). Nell’analisi precedente, questi pronomi personali, come anche i deittici che li circondano, godono di un ampio grado di trasparenza. In genere noi non siamo consapevoli della qualità segnica di «io», «tu», «qui», «ora», e così via.

La seconda classe di segni che significano il Sé consiste nei termini che designano l’equilibrio materiale-psichico di un essere umano, il senso della persona come materia e spirito, o corpo e mente, o come coscienza incarnata. In questa classe si osserva una predominanza di locuzioni metaforiche. Dal momento che non disponiamo di un linguaggio adeguato dell’anima o della mente – del nostro stato interiore –, prendiamo in prestito categorie del mondo e dei nostri corpi per esprimere il lato psicologico della nostra esistenza. Per esempio, Lakoff e Johnson, in un’opera che analizza con minuzia questo uso delle metafore, descrivono l’uso di metafore di orientamento (esempio «sono su di morale») e di entità (esempio «oggi la mia mente non funziona») – ovvero, aspetti del mondo materiale – per descrivere stati di mondo mentale o fisico (1980:14; 27).

Per completare il quadro di questo Sé, di cui si viene a conoscenza indirettamente attraverso i suoi segni, è necessario aggiungere un’ultima dimensione alle categorie di segno appena descritte: quelle di un Sé narrante, il Sé come si è evoluto nel corso della vita, con il suo passato, presente e futuro. La narratività conferisce al Sé le dimensioni di temporalità e memoria, e il loro inserimento nella storia, più o meno coerente, del destino di un signolo. Ciascuna di queste categorie trova il suo posto all’interno della narrazione della vita: il bambino cresce e diventa adulto, sceglie una certa professione e si evolve in essa, si crea legami e una famiglia, e così via.

27

Human identity as narrationial is a process, ultimately a reflective process. At a first level life is simply lived in habit and routine. Yet even here the unexamined life has, in Ricoeur’s terms, a prenarrative or prefigured quality (1984). A story is being lived, if not yet told. At a further, more reflective level, the story embodied in the life is told. The implicit narrative becomes an explicit narrative. Of course the actual process is far more complicated. The balance of the lived and the told is always changing. The average life may have many narratives, and the narrative of one’s own life intermingles with that of the narratives of others. One is thus a character in one’s own narratives as well as in those of others. In Kerby’s words:

Self-narration, I have argued, is what first raises our temporal existence out of the closets of memorial traces and routine and unthematic activity, constituting thereby a self as its implied subject. This self is, then, the implied subject of a narrated history. Stated another way, in order to be we must be as something or someone, and this someone that we take ourselves to be is the character delineated in our personal narratives. The unity of the self, where such unity exists, is exhibited as an identity in difference, which is all a temporal character can be. [1991, 109]

It should be added, finally, that metaphor is again deeply involved in the structuring of a narrated life. Such notions as story, character, and narrative are, after all, borrowed from literary genres. And locutions such as the “passage” or “flow” of life are based on such implicit metaphors as “life as a river.” Ultimately, given the polysemy of signs, most signs of the self are metaphorical, and we never really transcend this level. Such is the consequence of knowing the self through the indirection of signs.

28

L’identità umana in quanto narrativa è un processo, e sostanzialmente un processo riflessivo. A un primo livello la vita viene semplicemente vissuta nelle sue abitudini e nella sua routine. Eppure anche qui la vita non esaminata ha, come ha scritto Ricoeur, una qualità prenarrativa e prefigurata (1984). Una storia viene vissuta, anche se non ancora raccontata. A un livello avanzato e più riflessivo, la storia racchiusa nella vita viene raccontata. Il racconto implicito diventa un racconto esplicito. Di certo il processo vero e proprio è ben più complicato. L’equilibrio tra il vissuto e il detto cambia di continuo. Una vita media può avere molti racconti, e il racconto della vita di qualcuno si mescola con quello di altri. Una persona è quindi personaggio del proprio racconto e anche dei racconti di altri. Come ha scritto Kerby:

La narrazione del Sé, ho argomentato, è ciò che estrae la nostra esistenza temporale dall’armadio delle tracce di memoria, routine, e di attività atematiche, costituendo così un Sé in qualità di soggetto implicito. Questo Sé è quindi il soggetto implicito di una storia raccontata. Detto in altre parole, per poter essere dobbiamo essere in qualità di qualcosa o qualcuno, e questo qualcuno che noi decidiamo di essere è il personaggio delineato nei nostri racconti personali. L’unità del Sé, laddove esista questa unità, viene espressa come identità nella differenza, che è tutto ciò che un personaggio temporale può essere (1991:109).

Va aggiunto infine che, ancora una volta, nella strutturazione della vita raccontata la metafora ha un ruolo importante. Concetti come «storia», «personaggio» e «racconto» sono, in fondo, presi in prestito dai generi letterari. E locuzioni come «lo scorrere» o «il corso» della vita si basano su metafore implicite del tipo «la vita è un fiume». Infine, data la polisemia, la maggior parte dei segni del Sé è metaforica, e noi non riusciamo mai a trascendere veramente questo livello. È questa la conseguenza del conoscere il Sé attraverso l’azione indiretta dei segni.

29

In view of the complexity of personal identity as a self-narrated network of signs, it is not hard to imagine the difficulties of someone in the course of a psychosis. Since there never was a clear, introspected “I,” we cannot technically speak of the loss of this “I” in psychosis. What we look for, rather, is a collapse of the network of signs through which the self is constituted. We regularly see problems with the use of the personal pronouns, as with those patients who use third person locutions to avoid the use of “I” in speaking about themselves. Here the externality of the “I” as sign is transformed into the use of “he” to refer to the self. In this regard, Peirce’s remarks about the child’s learning to name him- or herself by being named by the parents (Peirce 1868a, 18 – 21) (and the child’s well-known tendency to refer to him or herself in the third person) are apposite. If the child’s first experience with the personal pronoun is a self-label learned from another, the externality of the “I” sign is highlighted from the beginning of speaking life. Muller describes a psychotic patient who avoids the use of personal pronouns and other deictic references (1996, 108), and Sass elaborates on this abandonment of deictic indicators in schizophrenia (1992, 177).

The need to use metaphoric expressions to express the psycho-body duality leads to distortions in both directions. A patient in the midst of an acute psychosis and struggling with the material and biological dimensions of his identity said over and over again that he was nothing but a hollow tube in which food entered at one end and shit exited at the other. Not able to tolerate his condition as an embodied, biological organism, he exaggerated this into his entire identity. A contrasting resolution for the same conflict was offered by a psychotically depressed man who insisted that he had no body.

The categories that serve to mark and anchor one’s identity into a narrative unity are often employed in a distorted and disorganized manner. A chronically schizophrenic man whom I have known for years has a set of categories with which he attempts to demarcate himself: good student in high school, marine, construction worker, husband, father, unable to work for many years, schizophrenic.

30

Alla luce della complessità dell’identità personale come rete di segni che narrano il Sé, non è difficile immaginarsi le difficoltà di un soggetto psicotico. Dal momento che non c’è mai stato un «Io» frutto di introspezione ben definito, nella psicosi non è tecnicamente possibile parlare della perdita di questo «Io». Ciò che invece intendo mostrare è il crollo di una rete di segni che costituisce il Sé. Di solito vediamo i problemi attraverso l’uso dei pronomi personali, come in quei pazienti che usano la terza persona per evitare l’uso [del pronome] «Io» quando parlano di sé stessi. Qui l’esteriorità di «io» in quanto segno si trasforma nell’uso di «egli» per riferirsi a sé. A questo proposito, sono appropriate le osservazioni di Peirce sul bambino che impara a nominare sé stesso quando viene nominato dai genitori (Peirce 1868:96-99) (e la nota tendenza che il bambino ha a riferirsi a sé stesso in terza persona). Se la prima esperienza che il bambino ha con il pronome personale è un’etichetta del Sé appresa da un altro, l’esteriorità del segno «Io» viene evidenziata nelle prime fasi dell’uso della parola. Muller descrive un paziente psicotico che evita di usare i pronomi personali e altri deittici (1996:108), e Sass approfondisce l’abbandono dei deittici nella schizofrenia (1992:177).

La necessità di ricorrere a espressioni metaforiche per esprimere la dualità corpo-psiche porta a distorsioni in entrambe le direzioni. Un paziente affetto da psicosi acuta e che si scontra con la dimensione materiale della sua identità e con quella biologica ha sostenuto più e più volte di non essere nient’altro che un tubo cavo in cui del cibo entrava da una estremità e della merda usciva dall’altra. Incapace di tollerare questa sua condizione di organismo biologico concreto, l’ha portata all’estremo fino a ridurre la propria identità a questo. Una soluzione opposta al medesimo conflitto è stata data da uno psicotico depresso che insisteva nel sostenere di non avere un corpo.

Le categorie necessarie a contraddistinguere e fissare l’identità di una persona in un’unità narrativa sono spesso impiegate in modo distorto e disorganizzato. Un uomo affetto da schizofrenia cronica che conosco da anni possiede una serie di categorie con le quali cerca di demarcare sé stesso: «bravo studente alle superiori», «marine», «operaio edile», «marito», «padre», «impossibilitato a lavorare per diversi anni», «schizofrenico».

31

These are, however, never ordered in a meaningful way with expectable priorities, hierarchies, and temporal layerings, nor are they narrated into an integrated life. For instance, categories that have not been relevant for decades (e.g., marine, construction worker) are placed alongside contemporary categories, with little sense of current relevance and the temporal passage from one to the other. This man also demonstrates the way in which many patients use the category of “mental patient” or “schizophrenic” as an identity tag that sums up all that is wrong with them in a way that cannot be further articulated.

Finally, the routine use of metaphors to describe aspects of the self offers endless opportunities for confused, psychotic thinking and speech. To take a simple example, Lakoff and Johnson offer the following specimens of “the mind is a machine” metaphor: “My mind just isn’t operating today”; “Boy, the wheels are turning now”; I’m a little rusty today”; “We’ve been working on this problem all day and now we’re running out of steam” (1980, 27). With each of these statements, taking the expression literally rather than figuratively will lead to the most bizarre notions about one’s own mind. Metaphor always operates through a dialectic of similarity and dissimilarity. Thus, each of the above statements has the general form of “my mind is like a machine.” If the “like” is removed, the result is literal, concrete, metaphoric, and possibly psychotic.

The Triadic Sign and Psychosis

The above discussion has focused on the implications of general principles of Peircean semiotics for an understanding of psychotic thinking and speech. It is now time to concentrate on Peirce’s unique triadic conception of the sign to see what further light it sheds on psychotic thought. The line of thought developed in this section is not intended to replace or supersede but rather to extend that developed above.

32

A ogni modo queste categorie non sono mai ordinate in modo significativo o in ordine di priorità, gerarchia, o livello temporale prevedibile, e non sono neppure raccontate dando forma a una vita integrata. Per esempio, categorie che non sono rilevanti da decenni (come «marine» e «operaio edile») vengono poste accanto a categorie contemporanee, dimostrando scarso senso di ciò che è attuale e del passaggio temporale dall’una all’altra. Quest’uomo dimostra inoltre come molti pazienti utilizzino la categoria di «paziente psichiatrico» o «schizofrenico» come etichetta che riassume tutto ciò che c’è di sbagliato in loro in un modo non ulteriormente articolabile.

Infine, l’uso consuetudinario delle metafore per descrivere aspetti del Sé offre infinite possibilità di pensieri e discorsi psicotici e confusi. Per fare un esempio semplice, Lakoff e Johnson propongono i seguenti esempi della metafora «la mente è una macchina». «Oggi la mente non mi funziona»; «Gente, ora le rotelle stanno girando»; «Oggi sono un po’ arrugginito»; «È tutto il giorno che lavoriamo a questo problema e adesso abbiamo esaurito le batterie» (1980:27). Nel caso di ciascuna di queste affermazioni, prendere l’espressione alla lettera, e non in senso figurato, porta a pensare le cose più assurde della mente di una persona. Le metafore funzionano sempre attraverso la dialettica della somiglianza e dissomiglianza. Pertanto, ciascuna delle affermazioni di cui sopra ha la forma generale di «la mia mente è come una macchina». Se viene eliminato il «come», il risultato è letterale, concreto, metaforico e, infine, psicotico.

Il segno triadico e la psicosi

La discussione precedente si è focalizzata sulle implicazioni dei principi generali della semiotica peirciana per una concezione del pensiero e del discorso psicotico. È ora il momento di concentrarsi sulla concezione triadica del segno tipica di Peirce, per vedere come ha approfondito ulteriormente il pensiero psicotico. La linea di pensiero sviluppata in questa sezione non intende sostituire quella appena sviluppata, ma intende piuttosto ampliarla.

33

In the varied definitions of the sign he offered over several decades, Peirce always included the triad of sign, object, and interpretant. In Houser’s summary:

In its most abbreviated form, Peirce’s theory of signs goes something like this. A sign is anything which stands for something to something. What the sign stands for is its object, what it stands to is the interpretant. The sign relation is fundamentally triadic: eliminate either the object or the interpretant and you annihilate the sign. This was the key insight of Peirce’s semiotic, and one that distinguishes it from most theories of representation that attempt to make sense of signs (representations) that are related only to objects. [1992, xxxvi]

The triadic nature of the sign may be illustrated with one of Peirce’s own examples, a thermometer (quoted in Deely 1990, 24). As a physical thing in the natural world, the thermometer’s column of mercury is caused to rise by an increase in the ambient temperature. As such, the thermometer is a thing among things and a part of the natural causal order. It is not yet a sign. What transforms this thermometer-thing into a sign is that it “stands for something to something.” It stands for its object, the ambient temperature, to its interpretant, the person recognizinig the thermometer as a thermometer. One reason for Peirce’s neologism, “interpretant,” as opposed to “interpreter,” is to focus on the fact that the interpretant is more precisely not the “interpreting” person but rather the thought generated in the mind of the “interpreting” person or consciousness. The interpretant of the thermometer-sign is thus the idea of such and such ambient temperature in the mind of the observer. The sign is said to mediate between object — the ambient temperature — and interpretant — the idea of the ambient temperature. In this example, then, by means of the thermometer-sign, the observer can form an idea of the ambient temperature.

34

Nelle varie definizioni di segno che ci ha donato nel corso di molti decenni, Peirce si è sempre concentrato sulla triade di segno, oggetto e interpretante. Come riassume Houser:

Nella sua forma più abbreviata, la teoria dei segni di Peirce afferma qualcosa del tipo: un segno è qualunque cosa che in base a qualcosa sta per qualcosa. Quello per cui sta il segno è il suo oggetto, l’effetto tramite il quale sta per l’oggetto. La relazione segnica è fondamentalmente triadica: eliminando l’oggetto o l’interpretante, si annienta il segno. Era questa l’intuizione chiave della semiotica di Peirce, e ciò che la distingue dalla maggior parte delle teorie della rappresentazione che cercano di dare un senso ai segni (rappresentazioni) che sono in relazione soltanto con gli oggetti (1992: XXXVI).

La natura triadica del segno può essere illustrata con uno degli esempi di Peirce: un termometro (citato in Deely 1990:24). In quanto cosa fisica nel mondo naturale, la colonnina di mercurio del termometro cresce a causa di un aumento della temperatura nell’ambiente. In quanto tale il termometro è una cosa tra le cose ed è parte dell’ordine naturale causale. Non è ancora un segno. Ciò che trasforma questa cosa-termometro in un segno è che il termometro «in base a qualcosa sta per qualcosa». In base al suo interpretante, la persona che riconosce il termometro come termometro, sta per il suo oggetto, la temperatura ambientale. La scelta di Peirce di coniare il neologismo «interpretante», in contrapposizione a «interprete» è stata dettata dal fatto che «interpretante», per essere più precisi, non è la persona «che interpreta» ma invece il pensiero che si genera nella mente o nella coscienza della persona «che interpreta». L’interpretante del segno termometro è perciò l’idea di una certa temperatura ambientale nella mente di chi osserva. Il segno si dice che faccia da mediatore tra oggetto – la temperatura ambientale – e interpretante – l’idea della temperatura ambientale. Secondo questo esempio, dunque, l’osservatore riesce a formarsi un’idea della temperatura ambientale per mezzo del segno-termometro.

35

The most commonsense understanding of the Peircean sign is that of the sign as word or gesture, not a thing as in the example of the thermometer. As word or gesture the sign structure is that of one person signifying something about the world to another person. The sign is the statement or gesture of the first person, the object is that about which this person is speaking or signifying, and the interpretant is the second person (or second person’s thought) to whom the first person is communicating. The triadic structure in this case would involve one person signifying something to another person about something. In a much-quoted letter of 1908, Peirce described the sign structure in this manner: “I define a Sign as anything which is so determined by something else, called its Object, and so determines an effect upon a person, which I call its Interpretant, that the latter is thereby mediately determined by the former” (1977, 80 – 81).

Peirce was vigorous in his insistence, however, that the sign need not involve separate individuals in this way. Specifically, the interpretant need not be another person or mind. The above quote is immediately followed by the sentence: “My insertion of ‘upon a person’ is a sop to Cerberus, because I despair of making my own broader conception understood” (ibid.). Thus, the interpretant may be the thought of another person, but may as well be simply the further thought of the first person.

36

La concezione più diffusa del segno peirciano è quella del segno come parola o gesto, e non come cosa, come nell’esempio del termometro. In quanto parola o gesto, la struttura segnica è quella di una persona che significa qualcosa riguardante il mondo comunicando con un’altra persona. Il segno è l’affermazione o il gesto della prima persona, l’oggetto è ciò di cui questa persona sta parlando o che sta significando, e l’interpretante è la seconda persona (o il pensiero della seconda persona) a cui la prima persona sta comunicando. La struttura triadica in questo caso coinvolgerebbe una persona che significa qualcosa comunicando con un’altra persona riguardo a qualcosa. In una lettera molto citata del 1908, Peirce descrive così la struttura segnica:

Definisco «segno» qualunque cosa che è così determinata da qualcos’altro, chiamato il suo «oggetto» e [che] determina così un effetto su una persona, che chiamo il suo «interpretante», che quest’ultimo è di conseguenza determinato in modo mediato dal precedente (1977:80-81)6.

Tuttavia, Peirce insisteva con vigore che il segno non deve necessariamente coinvolgere due individui distinti. Nello specifico, l’interpretante non deve essere necessariamente un’altra persona o un’altra mente. Alla citazione riportata qui sopra segue la frase:

Il fatto che abbia inserito «su una persona» è un boccone lanciato a Cerbero, perché dispero di far capire la mia concezione più ampia (ibidem)7.

L’interpretante può pertanto essere il pensiero di un’altra persona, ma può anche essere semplicemente un ulteriore pensiero della prima persona.

6

determines an effect upon a person, which I call its Interpretant, that the latter is thereby

mediately determined by the former.

I define a Sign as anything which is so determined by something else, called its Object, and so

7
broader conception understood.

My insertion of “upon a person” is a sop to Cerberus, because I despair of making my own

37

In any process of thought, for example, in any soliloquy, the succeeding thought is the interpretant of the preceding thought. That is, each thought interprets the thought that has preceded it. A particular thought is then both the interpretant of the thought that precedes it and the object of the interpretant thought that succeeds it.

This generalization of the sign relationship to a process that can take place in one mind and need not involve the participation of two minds, although clearly an abstraction from the more straightforward, two-person notion of semiotic process, is still not the level of generalization that Peirce wished to reach for the sign. In his most abstract, most general understanding of the sign, it need not involve any mind at all. As he wrote in 1902, “If the logician is to talk of the operations of the mind at all . . . he must mean by ‘mind’ something quite different from the object of study of the psychologist. . . . Logic will here be defined as formal semiotic. A definition of a sign will be given which no more refers to human thought than does the definition of a line as the place which a particle occupies, part by part, during a lapse of time” (quoted in Fisch 1986, 343).

As this statement indicates, Peirce was interested in an understanding of logic and semiotics that was wholly independent of psychology. For our purposes, however, we will have to draw him back to psychology — specifically to such questions as to how semiotic processes develop and how they actually work in human beings.

38

In ogni processo di pensiero, per esempio, in ogni soliloquio, il pensiero seguente è l’intepretante del pensiero che lo precede. Ovvero, ciascun pensiero interpreta il pensiero che lo ha preceduto. Un certo pensiero è quindi sia l’interpretante del pensiero che lo precede che l’oggetto del pensiero interpretante che lo segue.

Tale generalizzazione della relazione segnica come processo che può aver luogo nella mente di un individuo e non implica necessariamente il coinvolgimento di due menti, seppure sia chiaramente un’astrazione dal concetto di processo semiotico più diretto e che coinvolge due persone, non è comunque il livello di generalizzazione che Peirce desiderava raggiungere per il segno. Nella sua concezione più astratta e generica di segno, il segno non deve per forza coinvolgere una mente. Come ha scritto nel 1902:

Se il logico deve necessariamente parlare delle operazioni della mente [...] per «mente» deve intendere qualcosa di molto diverso dall’oggetto di studio dello psicologo. [...] Qui la logica verrà definita semiotica formale. Verrà data una definizione di segno che non si riferisce al pensiero umano più di quanto non lo faccia la definizione di una linea come il posto occupato da una particella, pezzo per pezzo, in un arco di tempo (citato in Fisch 1986:343)8.

Come si evince da questa affermazione, Peirce era interessato a una concezione di logica e semiotica del tutto indipendente dalla psicologia. Per i fini che mi propongo è tuttavia necessario riportarlo alla psicologia e, nello specifico, a quelle questioni riguardanti le modalità di sviluppo dei processi semiotici e il loro funzionamento effettivo negli esseri umani.

8

If the logician is to talk of the operations of the mind at all [...] he must mean by “mind” something wuite different from the object of study of the psychologist. [...] Logic will here be defined as formal semiotic. A definition of a sign will be given which no more refers to human thought than does the definition of a line as the place which a particle occupies, part by part, during a lapse of time.

39

For these questions the final abstraction is of limited use, while the less abstract levels of sign process — involving either one or two persons (or minds) — will prove to be of great use. Although for Peirce “the interpretant is deliberately not described as being necessarily an idea in the mind of someone” (Colapietro 1989, 7), our focus, remaining as we will at a more psychological level, will be on the interpretant as an idea in the mind of someone.

If we try to imagine actual sign use in ordinary circumstances, we must envisage a complex and changing situation in which the subject may occupy any (or all) of the positions of the sign triad at any particular moment. The subject may thus be the sign, the object (to him or herself or another), or the interpretant (of his or her own thought or that of another). In an encounter between two people, each speaker’s utterance will be the sign referring about something, the object, to the other person, the interpretant. But the speaker will at the same time also be the interpretant and object of his or her own ongoing speech, and as well the object in another sense if referring to him- or herself. The situation then quickly reverses as the other begins to speak. And as the dialogue continues and begins to take the form of a single thought process with two voices — a notion with which Peirce was highly sympathetic, referring to us as “mere cells of a social organism” (quoted in Colapietro 1989, 65) — we may say that it becomes a kind of soliloquy. In that event the sign and the interpretant (and at times the object) are at all times both of the speakers. But then recalling that for Peirce, in agreement with Plato, “all thought is dialogue” (quoted in Colapietro 1989, xiv), we conclude that the distinctions between soliloquy and dialogue — between a one-person and a two-person thought process — blur. A dialogue is always a soliloquy and a soliloquy is always a dialogue. In each case the same triadic sign process obtains.

Peirce elaborated his analysis of signs by classifyin them into three trichotomies (and then later into a tenfold classification).

40

L’astrazione definitiva è di poco aiuto per rispondere a tali domande, mentre livelli di astrazione minore del processo segnico – che coinvolgono una o due persone (o menti) – si riveleranno di grande aiuto. Sebbene secondo Peirce «l’interpretante sia deliberatamente descritto come qualcosa che non è necessariamente un’idea nella mente di qualcuno» (Colapietro 1989:7), per attenermi, come farò, a un livello più psicologico, porrò l’attenzione sull’interpretante in quanto idea nella mente di qualcuno.

Se proviamo a immaginare un uso effettivo del segno in circostanze ordinarie, dobbiamo raffigurarci nella mente una situazione complessa e in continuo cambiamento nella quale il soggetto in qualunque momento può occupare una qualsiasi posizione della triade segnica (o anche tutte). Il soggetto può quindi essere il segno, l’oggetto (per lui o per lei o per un’altra persona), o l’interpretante (del suo pensiero o di quello di qualcun altro). Nell’incontro tra due persone, ciascuna enunciazione del parlante sarà il segno che si riferisce a qualcosa, l’oggetto, per l’altra persona, l’interpretante. Ma chi parla, allo stesso tempo sarà interpretante e oggetto del suo discorso così come l’oggetto in un altro senso se fa riferimento a sé stesso. La situazione quindi si rovescia velocemente quando l’altro inizia a parlare. E dal momento che il dialogo continua e inizia a prendere la forma di un singolo processo di pensiero a due voci – concetto che Peirce condivideva parecchio, riferendosi a noi come «mere cellule di un organismo sociale» (citato in Colapietro 1989:65) – possiamo dire che diventa una sorta di soliloquio. In quel caso il segno e l’interpretante (e talvolta l’oggetto) appartengono entrambi al parlante. Se però richiamiamo alla mente Peirce che, in accordo con Platone, sosteneva che «ogni pensiero è un dialogo» (citato in Colapietro 1989:XIV), si può concludere che la distinzione tra soliloquio e dialogo – tra un processo di pensiero a una persona e a due persone – si confonde. Un dialogo è sempre un soliloquio, e un soliloquio è sempre un dialogo. In entrambi i casi si presenta lo stesso processo segnico triadico.

Peirce elaborò la sua analisi dei segni classificandoli in tre tricotomie (e poi in seguito in dieci classi).

41

For our purposes we need only focus on one of the first trichotomies, that of the relation of sign to object, and within that division only the distinction between index and symbol. The indexical sign has an actual connection with its object. As Peirce puts it, “An Index is a sign which refers to the Object that it denotes by virtue of being really affected by that Object” (1897, 102). Examples are a footprint in the sand or a rap on the door. In contrast, the symbolic sign has an arbitrary, conventional relation to its object. Again in Peirce’s words, “A Symbol is a sign which refers to the Object that it denotes by virtue of a law, usually an association of general ideas, which operates to cause the symbol to be interpreted as referring to that Object” (ibid.). The immediate examples are words, which, except for occasional onomatopoeic qualities, are associated with their referents in a wholly arbitrary, conventional manner.

Appreciating, then, the complexity of the semiotic processes in the most ordinary speech or thought, it is not hard to imagine the range of distortions these processes may undergo in psychosis. In what follows I will first describe some examples of these distortions and then suggest the developmental processes and disturbances that may be related to them.

Let us begin with the patient described above who carefully examines his mental experiences and often overinterprets and misinterprets them. For instance, he experiences a sexual sensation when in the presence of a woman at work. In Peircean terms this sensation is an index of the patient’s arousal and of the woman as the object of his desire. Further, we would say that the interpretant of the sign is the further thought that follows the patient’s sudden urge, such as a thought that he might like to go out with the woman (or whatever thought occurs in the woman, if he indicates his desire to her).

42

Considerato l’obiettivo che mi sono prefissato, è necessario che mi soffermi soltanto su una delle prime tricotomie, quella del rapporto tra segno e oggetto, e all’interno di tale divisione sulla sola distinzione tra indice e simbolo. Il segno indicale ha una connessione effettiva con il suo oggetto. Come sostiene Peirce: «Un Indice è un segno che si riferisce all’Oggetto che esso denota in virtù del fatto che è realmente determinato da quell’Oggetto» (1897:102)9. Esempi sono le impronte sulla sabbia e il bussare alla porta. Diversamente, il segno simbolico è in rapporto arbitrario e convenzionale con il suo oggetto. Utilizzando ancora le parole di Peirce: «Un Simbolo è un segno che si riferisce all’Oggetto che esso denota in virtù di una legge, di solito un’associazione di idee generali, che opera in modo che il Simbolo sia interpretato come riferentesi a quell’Oggetto» (ibidem)10. Esempi immediati sono parole che, a eccezione di occasionali qualità onomatopeiche, sono associate ai loro referenti in modo del tutto arbitrario e convenzionale.

Comprendendo pertanto la complessità dei processi semiotici nel più ordinario discorso o pensiero, non è difficile immaginare la gamma di distorsioni che questi processi possono subire nella psicosi. In quanto segue descriverò in primo luogo alcuni esempi di queste distorsioni e proseguirò poi con ipotesi sui processi evolutivi e i disturbi che possono esservi collegati.

Per cominciare riprendo l’esempio, descritto in precedenza, del paziente che esamina con attenzione le proprie esperienze mentali e che spesso le interpreta in modo esagerato ed erroneo. Il paziente ha, per esempio, una sensazione sessuale quando al lavoro si trova in presenza di una donna. In termini peirciani questa sensazione è un indice dell’eccitazione del paziente, e della donna come oggetto del suo desiderio. Direi inoltre che l’intepretante del segno è il pensiero successivo che segue l’improvviso bisogno del paziente, come per esempio che a lui potrebbe far piacere uscire con quella donna (o qualunque pensiero si presenti nella donna qualora lui le esprimesse questo desiderio nei confronti di lei).

9
that Object (CP 2.247).

An Index is a sign which refers to the Object that it denotes by virtue of being really affected by

10

A Symbol is a sign which refers to the Object that it denotes by virtue of a law, usually an association of general ideas, which operates to cause the Symbol to be interpreted as referring to that Object (CP 2.249).

43

However, things are not so simple for this patient. As soon as he experiences the sensation he quickly concludes (1) that the woman has provoked the feeling, and (2) that she was ordained to do this so that he will have sexual experience. The sensation has now shifted from an indexical to a symbolic plane. The patient is not simply affected by the object, the woman, which would make his feeling an index. There is an intention from an outside force that is being communicated to him. His feeling thus has the power of a symbolic communication, although not with the full clarity of spoken language. Furthermore, the positions of sign, object, and interpretant become increasingly complex and confused. Since he also assumes that the woman has had desire toward him placed in her, they are each both object and interpretant: objects both for each other and of the outside force, and interpretants of the other’s desire as well as of the outside intention.

Another patient asks me to uncross my legs after I have crossed them in the middle of a session. Asked to explain her request, she informs me that she takes the crossing of my legs to be a sexual pass toward her. This woman has taken a rather simple, low-level sign — the leg-crossing as an index drawing attention to me (and possibly of my discomfort or restlessness) — and treated it as a gesture of my desire toward her. Again, there is a shift from index to symbol. The leg-crossing has taken on elaborate symbolic significance. Moreover, she has completely altered the relationships of sign, object, and interpretant. The object —what is represented by the leg-crossing —is no longer my discomfort but is now herself, the object of my desire and gesture. And the interpretant has become herself as the interpreting agent with all the reactions evoked or provoked by my putative advance.

Finally, let me suggest a more complex example, that of the paranoid patient. How may he be analyzed from a semiotic perspective?

44

A ogni modo, per questo paziente le cose non sono così semplici. Non appena prova questa sensazione conclude subito (1) che la donna ha provocato quel sentimento e (2) che le era stato imposto di comportarsi così in modo che lui avesse un’eccitazione. La sensazione si è spostata ora da un piano indicale a uno simbolico. Il paziente non è semplicemente colpito dall’oggetto, la donna, il che renderebbe il suo sentimento un indice. C’è l’intenzione di una forza esterna, che gli viene comunicata. Il suo sentimento ha pertanto il potere di una comunicazione simbolica, sebbene non abbia la piena chiarezza della lingua parlata. Inoltre, la posizione di segno, oggetto e intepretante si fa sempre più complessa e confusa. Dal momento che anche lui presume che la donna abbia avuto un desiderio nei suoi confronti che le è stato imposto, sono entrambi sia oggetto che interpretante: oggetti sia l’uno per l’altro che della forza esterna, e interpretanti dell’altrui desiderio così come dell’intenzione esterna.

Un’altra paziente durante una seduta mi chiede di non tenere le gambe accavallate come le avevo appena messe. Quando le ho chiesto di spiegare la sua richiesta mi ha risposto che lei percepisce il mio accavallare le gambe come un’avance sessuale verso di lei. Questa donna ha preso un segno piuttosto semplice e di basso livello – l’accavallamento delle gambe come indice che richiama l’attenzione su di me (e possibilmente del mio disagio o della mia irrequietezza) – e lo ha considerato un segno del mio desiderio nei suoi confronti. Ancora una volta si presenta un passaggio da indice a simbolo. Accavallare le gambe ha assunto un significato simbolico elaborato. La donna ha inoltre alterato completamente le relazioni di segno, oggetto e interpretante. L’oggetto – ciò che è rappresentato dall’accavallamento delle gambe – non è più il mio disagio, ora è invece lei stessa l’oggetto del mio desidero e del mio gesto. Inoltre l’interpretante è diventato lei stessa in quanto agente interpretante con tutte le reazioni evocate o provocate dalla mia ipotetica avance.

Mi si permetta infine di ragionare su un esempio più complesso, quello di un paziente paranoide. Come potrebbe essere analizzato da un punto di vista semiotico?

45

To begin, he is someone who identifies himself as the object of the signifying and interpreting activities of others. They talk and plan about him. Sometimes they signify (so he thinks) to him. It then becomes his task to interpret their communications (about him or to him). He does not really talk to or with anyone; he is unable to assume the position of the signifying agent that would be required for this. Even in an apparent conversation, he is busy placing himself as object and interpreting the hidden meanings of his interlocutor. There is certainly a jumble of sign classes in his distorted thinking. As in the above examples, simple indexes are taken for symbolic communications. The striking effect of these shifts is the way in which he becomes the object and interpretant of signs that in fact have nothing to do with him. Caught in these distorted and exaggerated poles of the sign triad as the object and the interpretant, and never the signifying agent, he loses the freedom that goes with that position.

What emerges from these examples is the generalization that, in psychotic thinking, the specification of the precise Peircean sign category is less important than the recognition that in all cases there is an overinterpretation of simple indexes into symbols. Events in the world that do nothing but call attention to themselves (e.g., a spontaneous cry) or provide information about the object in question (e.g., a weathercock) are taken to mean more that they are. This corrupted meaning always implies some other agency generating the meaning, however anonymous that agency remains; and with that implicit agency there is an improper shuffling of the positions of sign, object, and interpretant. In this psychotic process a rustling of the trees does not remain a simple index of wind and current weather conditions. It carries the symbolic weight of hidden presence and communication, and the psychotic subject is not a neutral observer of the wind but rather the intended object and interpreter of whatever message is carried by the gesturing leaves.

46

Per iniziare, il soggetto è una persona che indentifica sé come oggetto delle attività di significazione e interpretazione degli altri. Loro parlano di lui e confabulano su di lui. Allora è suo compito interpretare quello che comunicano (su di lui o a lui). A volte loro significano (questo è quello che pensa lui) riferendosi a lui. Non parla realmente a o con qualcuno; è incapace di assumere la posizione dell’agente significante che sarebbe necessaria per farlo. Perfino in una conversazione immaginaria è impegnato a mettere sé stesso come oggetto e a interpretare i significati nascosti del suo interlocutore. Di certo nel suo pensiero distorto c’è un miscuglio di classi segniche. Come negli esempi precedenti, semplici indici sono presi per comunicazioni simboliche. L’effetto sorprendente di questi passaggi è il modo in cui il paziente diviene l’oggetto e l’interpretante di segni che in realtà non hanno niente a che fare con lui. Incastrato in questi poli di triade segnica distorti ed esagerati come l’oggetto e l’interpretante, e mai l’entità significativa, egli perde la libertà che pertiene a quella posizione.

Ciò che emerge da questi esempi è una generalizzazione, ovvero che nel pensiero psicotico la specificazione della precisa categoria segnica peirciana è meno importante rispetto al riconoscimento che in tutti i casi si ha un’iperinterpretazione di indici semplici fino a farli diventare simboli. Eventi del mondo che non fanno nient’altro che richiamare a sé l’attenzione (es. un grido spontaneo) o forniscono informazioni sull’oggetto in questione (es. una banderuola) vengono investiti di un significato maggiore rispetto a quello che hanno in realtà. Questo significato corrotto implica sempre qualche altra entità che genera il significato, per quanto anonima rimanga quell’entità, e con quell’entità implicita si ha un cambiamento improprio delle posizioni di segno, oggetto, e interpretante. In questo processo psicotico il frusciare degli alberi non resta un indice semplice del vento e delle condizioni climatiche in quel momento. Porta con sé il peso simbolico della presenza e della comunicazione nascoste, e il soggetto psicotico non è un osservatore neutrale del vento, ma piuttosto l’oggetto voluto e l’interprete di qualunque messaggio venga portato dalle foglie che gesticolano.

47

Sebeok has called attention to the importance of indexicality in Peirce’s conception of the sign:

Peirce contended that no matter of fact can be stated without the use of some sign serving as an index, the reason for this being the inclusion of designators as one of the main classes of indexes. He regarded designations as “absolutely indispensable both to communication and to thought. No assertion has any meaning unless there is some designation to show whether the universe of reality or what universe of fiction is referred to.” Deictics of various sorts, including tenses, constitute perhaps the most clear-cut examples of designations. Peirce identified universal and existential quantifiers with selective pronouns, which he classified with designation as well. [1995, 224]

Indexes are deictic indicators that anchor the speaker in the world, the world of this particular here and now and the world of this particular intersubjective situation. The psychotic may simply abandon the use of deictic references (as with Muller’s patient, whose speech contained no first-person references [1996, 108]) or, as emphasized in the above examples, confuse index with symbol. The consequence of this confusion is that, in the terminology of Peirce just cited by Sebeok, the psychotic does not offer adequate “designation to show whether the universe of reality or what universe of fiction is referred to.” But this is not for lack o designating indexes; it is rather that the psychotic, in confusing index and symbol, has thoroughly confounded the universes of reality and fantasy.

48

Sebeok ha richiamato l’attenzione sull’importanza dell’indicalità nella concezione peirciana di segno:

Peirce sosteneva che nessun fatto evidente può essere affermato senza l’uso di qualche segno che funga da indice; dal momento che i designatori sono considerati una delle classi principali di indici. [Peirce] considerava le designazioni «assolutamente indispensabili sia per comunicare che per pensare». Nessuna asserzione ha un significato a meno che non vi sia una designazione che mostri l’universo di realtà o l’universo di finzione a cui si riferisce». I deittici di ogni tipo, inclusi i tempi verbali, costituiscono forse gli esempi più limpidi di designazioni. Peirce identifica quantificatori universali e esistenziali con pronomi selettivi che ha classificato come designazioni (1995:224).

Gli indici sono indicatori deittici che ancorano al mondo chi parla, il mondo di questo particolare qui e ora e il mondo di questo particolare situazione intersoggettiva. Lo psicotico può semplicemente abbandonare l’uso dei riferimenti deittici (come nel caso del paziente di Muller, il cui discorso non conteneva nessun riferimento di prima persona (1996:108) oppure, come è stato evidenziato negli esempi precedenti, confondere l’indice con il simbolo. La conseguenza di questa confusione è che, per usare la terminologia di Peirce appena citato da Sebeok, lo psicotico non fornisce una adeguata «designazione che mostri l’universo di realtà o l’universo di finzione a cui si riferisce». Questo non avviene però per mancanza di indici di designazione, ma piuttosto perché lo psicotico, confondendo indice e simbolo, confonde del tutto gli universi di realtà e finzione.

49

Developmental Considerations

I would like to conclude with some suggestions, obviously quite speculative, concerning developmental processes that might be associated with the psychotic distortions of normal semiotic processes. In this discussion I will pass over the issue of the enormously complex relationship of constitution and development. It is common knowledge that the highly complex semiotic processes that Peirce has illuminated and that are part of ordinary adult thought and speech must be learned by children in the company of correctly thinking and speaking adults. The child development literature is replete with examples of child’s efforts to get its semiosis right. Indeed, Peirce himself offers perspicuous remarks about the way in which the child learns to recognize him- or herself through the comments made by adults about him or her. The child’s sense of self is a product of their testimony: “A child hears it said that the stove is hot. But it is not, he says; and indeed, that central body is not touching it, and only what that touches is hot or cold. But he touches it, and finds the testimony confirmed in a striking way. Thus, he becomes aware of ignorance, and it is necessary to suppose a self in which this ignorance can inhere. So testimony gives the first dawning of self-consciousness” (1868a, 20).

The seminal work in developmental semiotics has been carried out recently by Muller in Beyond the Psychoanalytic Dyad (1996).

50

Considerazioni evolutive

Desidero concludere con alcune osservazioni, decisamente teoriche, riguardanti processi evolutivi che potrebbero essere associati ai disturbi psicotici dei normali processi semiotici. In questa sezione non mi soffermerò sulla questione della relazione enormemente complessa di costituzione e sviluppo. Allo stesso modo non parlerò di quanto è generalmente noto e accettato riguardo allo sviluppo cognitivo e piscologico, ma lo terrò bene a mente. È noto a tutti che i processi semiotici altamente complessi che Peirce ha approfondito, e che fanno parte del normale pensiero e discorso adulto, devono essere appresi da bambini in presenza di adulti che pensano e parlano correttamente. La letteratura sull’età evolutiva è colma di esempi di sforzi dei bambini per capire bene la semiosi; Peirce stesso propone infatti numerose osservazioni sul modo in cui il bambino impara a riconoscere sé stesso attraverso i commenti che gli adulti fanno su di lui. La percezione di sé del bambino è il prodotto della testimonianza degli adulti:

Un bambino sente dire che la stufa è calda. Ma non è vero, dice; e, infatti, quel corpo centrale non la sta toccando, e soltanto ciò che si tocca è caldo o freddo. Tuttavia lo tocca e trova confermata la testimonianza in modo sorprendente. [Il bambino] diviene così consapevole dell’ignoranza, ed è necessario supporre un Sé a cui questa ignoranza possa inerire. La testimonianza pone le basi della coscienza di sé (1868a:20)11.

Il lavoro fondamentale nella semiotica evolutiva è stato portato avanti di recente da Muller in beyond the Psychoanalytic Dyad (1996).

11

A child hears it said that the stove is hot. But it is not, he says; and, indeed, that central body is not touching it, and only what that touches is hot or cold. But he touches it, and finds the testimony confirmed in a striking way. Thus, he becomes aware of ignorance, and it is necessary to suppose a self in which this ignorance can inhere. So testimony gives the first dawning of self-consciousness (CP 5.233).

51

Muller reviews the infant developmental literature extensively and demonstrates that the dyadic relationship of mother and infant is framed and held by the cultural system of signs to which they belong. This system is assimilated by Muller both to Peirce’s category of Third as well as to Lacan’s symbolic order. Muller shows further that it is the presence of this Third that prevents the mother-infant dyad from sliding into merger and fusion.

The Third is required to frame the dyad and thereby enable the partners to relate without merging. . . . The complexity of intersubjectivity . . . can best be understood when the dyadic processes of empathy and recognition are taken as operating in a triadic context in which a semiotic code frames and holds the dyad. It is the determining presence of such a code, shaping culture, communication, and context, that makes possible the saying of “I” and “you” whereby the human horizon is opened to reach of intimacy, both personal and perhaps also transcendent. [1996, 61 – 62]

I focus on another aspect of development that depends on a different aspect of Third. While in his most general descriptions of the categories Peirce connected Third to mediation and generality, he also applied the categories to specific domains such as that of the sign. On the one hand, the sign plays the mediating role that is associated with Third. In Greenlee’s words, “What the sign succeeds in mediating is the object-interpretant relation; for either actually or potentially the sign renders the object available to the interpreter (in whatever way available, whether for thinking, saying, acting, making, etc.)” (1973, 33 – 34).

52

Muller esamina nel dettaglio la letteratura sull’età evolutiva e dimostra come la relazione diadica di madre e neonato sia inquadrata e contenuta dal sistema di segni culturale a cui appartiene. Muller ha assimilato questo sistema sia alla categoria peirciana di «terzo» sia all’ordine simbolico di Lacan. Muller mostra inoltre che è la presenza di questo «terzo» a impedire alla diade madre- neonato di degenerare.

Il Terzo è richiesto per inquadrare la diade e permettere così ai partner di relazionarsi senza fondersi. [...] La complessità dell’intersoggettività [...] può essere spiegata meglio quando il processo diadico di empatia e riconoscimento viene dato per operante in un contesto triadico in cui un codice semiotico inquadra e regge la diade. È la presenza determinante di questo codice, che plasma la cultura, la comunicazione, e il contesto, a permettere di dire «io» e «tu» con i quali l’orizzonte umano si amplia fino a raggiungere la sfera intima, sia personale sia forse anche trascendente (1996:61-62).

Mi focalizzo su un altro aspetto dello sviluppo che dipende da un diverso aspetto del Terzo. Nelle sue descrizioni più generali delle categorie, Peirce collegava il Terzo alla mediazione e alla generalità; inoltre, allo stesso tempo, applicò le categorie a campi specifici come quello del segno. Da un lato il segno svolge il ruolo di mediatore associato al Terzo. Come affermò Greenlee:

Quello che il segno riesce a mediare è la relazione oggetto- interpretante; poiché effettivamente o potenzialmente il segno rende l’oggetto disponibile a chi interpreta (disponibile in qualunque modo, che sia per pensare, parlare, agire, fare, eccetera) (1973:33-34).

53

In this vein Peirce wrote, “In its genuine form, Third is the triadic relation existing between a sign, its object, and its interpreting thought, itself a sign, considered as constituting the mode of being of a sign. A sign mediates between the interpretant sign and its object” (1966, 389).

On the other hand, Peirce also brought all the categories to bear on the sign relationship: “A Sign, or Representamen, is a First which stands in such a genuine triadic relation to a Second, called its Object, as to be capable of determining a Third, called its Interpretant” (quoted in Anderson 1995, 46). In what follows I will emphasize the actual embodiment of Third in a real person in early development. While this may seem a departure from Muller’s understanding of the Third as the symbolic order, there is in fact no real departure, given Lacan’s instantiation of the symbolic order in the figure of the father.

Now what might be a Peircean reading of the early development of the triadic sign and its relation to psychosis? Let us begin by recalling that Peirce’s unique contribution to semiotics in his insistence on the triadic nature of the sign.

54

Su questa linea di pensiero Peirce scrisse:

Nella sua forma genuina, [la Thirdness]12 è la relazione triadica esistente tra un segno, il suo oggetto, e il suo pensiero interpretante, a sua volta un segno, considerato come elemento che costituisce il modo di essere di un segno. Un segno fa da mediatore tra il segno interpretante e il suo oggetto (1966:389)13.

D’altro canto, in Peirce tutte le categorie riguardano la relazione segnica:

Un segno, o Representamen, è un Primo che sta in una tale relazione triadica genuina con un Secondo, chiamato «oggetto», da essere in grado di determinare un Terzo, chiamato il suo «interpretante» (citato in Anderson 1995:46)14.

In quanto segue porrò l’accento sulla vera incarnazione del Terzo in una persona reale nelle prime fasi dello sviluppo. Sebbene possa sembrare un allontanamento dalla concezione che Muller ha del Terzo come ordine simbolico, in realtà non c’è un vero e proprio allontanamento, data l’esemplificazione di Lacan dell’ordine simbolico nella figura del padre.

Quale potrebbe essere dunque una lettura peirciana delle prime fasi dello sviluppo del segno triadico e della sua relazione con la psicosi? Per cominciare, si può richiamare alla mente quel contributo unico alla semiotica che fece Peirce insistendo sulla natura triadica del segno.

12
aveva utilizzato la parola Thirdness [terzità] N.d.T.

Nella versione originale citata dall’autore compare la parola Third [«terzo»]; Peirce, in realtà

13

interpreting thought, itself a sign, considered as constituting the mode of being of a sign. A sign

mediates between the interpretant sign and its object (CP 8.332).

14

A Sign, or Representamen, is a First which stands in such a genuine triadic relation to a Second, called its Object, as to be capable of determining a Third, called its Interpretant (CP 2.274).

In its genuine form, Thirdness is the triadic relation existing between a sign, its object, and the

55

“The sign relation is fundamentally triadic: eliminate either the object or the interpretant and you annihilate the sign. This was the key insight of Peirce’s semiotic, and one that distinguishes it from most theories of representation that attempt to make sense of signs (representations) that are related only to objects” (Houser 1992, xxxvi). The developmental question that inserts itself into this discussion is how the triadic nature of the sign is learned. The suggestion I wish to propose is that in early development — in learning semiosis —actual individuals may be important in a way that they are not in adult semiotic process. As was described above, an adult soliloquy is a triadic semiotic process in which sign, object ,and interpretant are all present in the single train of thought.(And also, as was described above, because the three components are all present, the soliloquy has qualities of a dialogue.)

The infant, however, does not begin in soliloquy; it begins in communicational interchange with its mother or care giver. What will later be the ability to have a “conversation” with itself must start with a “conversation” with its mother. It is as this conversation is internalized that the internal dialogue can take place. Now, since a dialogue must always involve the three components of the sign —in the straightforward case, one person talking to another about something — might it not be the case that not two but three real people (or more) are necessary to inculcate semiosis at the beginning of life? In other words, at the beginning, each component of the semiotic triad would be embodied in an actual person. Semiotically, the father would represent the critical third in the dialogue of mother and infant. Given Peirce’s identification of the interpretant as the third in the sign triad, the paradigmatic case would place the father as the interpretant of the mother-infant dialogue. In fact, however, the developing conversation with the infant would entail the usual alternation of roles as each of the three assumed the role of signifying agent, object, or interpretant.

56

La relazione segnica è fondamentalmente triadica: eliminando l’oggetto o l’interpretante si annienta il segno. Era questa l’intuizione chiave della semiotica di Peirce, e ciò che la distingue dalla maggior parte delle teorie della rappresentazione che cercano di dare un senso ai segni (rappresentazioni) in relazione soltanto con gli oggetti (Houser 1992:XXXVI).

La questione evolutiva che si inserisce in questa discussione riguarda la modalità di apprendimento della natura triadica del segno. Desidero osservare che nelle prime fasi dello sviluppo – nell’apprendimento della semiosi – individui reali possono essere importanti in modo diverso rispetto a quanto non lo siano nel processo semiotico adulto. Come è stato descritto in precedenza, un soliloquio adulto è un processo semiotico triadico in cui segno, oggetto, e interpretante sono tutti presenti nella singola concatenazione di pensieri. (Dal momento che, inoltre, come descritto in precedenza, sono presenti tutte e tre le componenti, il soliloquio ha le qualità di un dialogo).

A ogni modo, il neonato non inizia con un soliloquo; inizia con l’interscambio comunicativo con sua madre o con l’accuditore. Quella che in futuro sarà la capacità di fare una «conversazione» con sé stesso deve cominciare con una «conversazione» con sua madre. È quando questa conversazione viene interiorizzata che può avere luogo il dialogo interno. Ora, dal momento che un dialogo deve sempre coinvolgere i tre componenti del segno – nel caso diretto, una persona che parla di qualcosa a qualcuno – potrebbe non essere vero che siano necessarie non due ma tre (o più) persone reali per instillare la semiosi all’inizio della vita? In altre parole, all’inizio, ciascun componente della triade semiotica sarebbe rappresentato da una persona reale. Dal punto di vista semiotico, il padre rappresenterebbe il terzo critico nel dialogo tra madre e neonato. Data l’identificazione peirciana dell’interpretante con il Terzo nella triade segnica, il caso paradigmatico posizionerebbe il padre al posto dell’interpretante del dialogo madre-neonato. In effetti, comunque, la conversazione che si sviluppa con il neonato comporterebbe il solito alternarsi di ruoli ciascuno dei tre assume il ruolo di agente significativo, oggetto, o interpretante.

57

Indeed, a critical aspect of the evolution of the mother-infant dyad would be the ability of the mother and father to treat the infant as the object of their dialogue, in which case the child would experience itself as object of a semiotic process, as well as interpretant of the parental dialogue.

Whatever the apportionment of roles at a particular moment, the important point is the need for actual persons representing the three positions in the inculcation of semiosis. This would be the Peircean reading of early development and the tendency for a pathologically exclusive mother-infant relationship to promote psychosis. Adult object relationships require semiotic competence, and the development of semiotic competence depends on early object relationship. If actual people are necessary for early training in the semiotic triad, and a pathologically exclusive mother-infant relationship prevents the entrance of a third into relationship, the result will be a failure to inculcate the mastery of normal semiosis. (It should be noted, finally, that in this discussion I am not insisting on the literal presence of the child’s father but rather on the presence of another or others — or even of the father or another as a symbolic presence.)

Among the many possible failure scenarios — or aspects of what is really one failure scenario — in early semiotic development, let me mention three. The first would be that in which the mother’s interactions with the infant did not permit the presence of the father (literally or symbolically). In this case, with the father absent both as semiotic object as well as interpreter/interpretant of the mother-infant dialogue, the language would remain highly subjective, and the semiotic object would not achieve independence of subjective meaning. Conversation would never be about something truly exterior to the conversants. The second scenario would be the one in which the parents could not make the infant an object of their conversation. In this case the mother would not be sufficiently extricated from the dyadic relationship with the infant, and the infant would not experience itself wholly as object, or as interpreter/interpretant of a conversation about it.

58

In realtà, un aspetto critico dell’evoluzione della diade madre-neonato consisterebbe nella capacità della madre e del padre di trattare il neonato come oggetto del loro dialogo, caso in cui il bambino avrebbe un’esperienza di sé come oggetto di un processo semiotico, oltre che come interpretante del dialogo tra i genitori.

Qualunque sia la ripartizione dei ruoli in un momento particolare, l’aspetto importante è la necessità delle persone reali di rappresentare le tre posizioni quando instillano la semiosi. Questa sarebbe la lettura peirciana delle prime fasi dello sviluppo e la tendenza a promuovere la psicosi a relazione patologicamente esclusiva madre-neonato. Le relazioni oggettuali adulte richiedono una competenza semiotica, e lo sviluppo della competenza semiotica dipende dalle relazioni oggettuali infantili. Se per la formazione infantile alla triade semiotica sono necessarie persone reali, e una relazione patologicamente esclusiva madre-figlio impedisce l’ingresso di un terzo nella relazione, ne consegue l’impossibilità di instillare la padronanza della semiosi normale. (Va notato, infine, che in questa sezione non insisto sulla presenza letterale del padre del bambino, ma piuttosto sulla presenza di un altro o di altri – o anche del padre o di un altro come presenza simbolica).

Tra i tanti possibili scenari di tale insuccesso – o aspetti di ciò che è realmente uno scenario di insuccesso – nel primo sviluppo semiotico, permettetemi di menzionarne tre. Il primo sarebbe quello in cui l’interazione della madre con il neonato non ammette la presenza del padre (letterale o simbolico). In questo caso, con l’assenza del padre sia come oggetto semiotico che come interprete/interpretante del dialogo madre-neonato, la lingua rimarrebbe altamente soggettiva, e l’oggetto semiotico non raggiungerebbe l’indipendenza del significato soggettivo. La conversazione non riguarderebbe mai qualcosa di veramente esterno agli interlocutori. Il secondo scenario sarebbe quello in cui i genitori non sono riusciti a fare del neonato l’oggetto della loro conversazione. In questo caso la madre non viene sradicata a sufficienza dalla relazione diadica con il neonato, e il neonato non avrebbe una piena esperienza di sé come oggetto, né come interprete/interpretante di una conversazione che lo riguarda.

59

The third scenario would be one in which the infant and father could not engage in an interaction that took the mother as object. Here the infant would not have the experience of the mother as object as well as subject, and as in the second scenario, as someone fully separate from itself. Each scenario thus represents a variation on the need for embodiment of the various positions of the semiotic triad in actual persons in the early inculcation of semiosis.

Conclusion

This reflection of Peircean semiotics and psychosis has moved through three stages. In a first stage I focused on Peirce’s most general notions concerning the dependence of thought on signs and concerning the externality of the sign. In his or her relationships both to the world and to the self, the psychotic was seen as foundering on the externality of the sign. In a second stage I focused more specifically on Peirce’s triadic understanding of the sign. Here the emphasis fell, on the one hand, on the psychotic’s conflation of sign, object, and interpretant, and on the other hand, on his or her confusion of index and symbol. In a third and final stage, I questioned the developemenal implications of a Peircean analysis, suggesting the need for actual embodiment of the semiotic trad in early development and the failure of this in the potential psychotic.

60

Il terzo scenario sarebbe quello in cui il neonato e il padre non riescono a sviluppare un’interazione che abbia la madre come oggetto. In questo caso il neonato non avrebbe l’esperienza della madre come oggetto né come soggetto, né, come nel caso del secondo scenario, come qualcuno del tutto separato da sé stesso. Ciascuno scenario rappresenta pertanto una variante sulla necessità di incarnare, durante la prima fase di instillazione della semiosi, le diverse posizioni della triade semiotica con persone reali.

Conclusione

Questa riflessione sulla semiotica di Peirce e sulla psicosi ha seguito tre fasi. In una prima fase mi sono concentrato sulle più generali concezioni di Peirce riguardanti la dipendenza del pensiero dai segni e l’esteriorità del segno. Nelle sue relazioni sia con il mondo che con il Sé, lo psicotico è stato visto andare in crisi sull’esteriorità del segno. In una seconda fase mi sono concentrato più specificamente sulla concezione triadica peirciana del segno. Qui ho posto l’enfasi, da un lato, sulla fusione psicotica di segno, oggetto, e interpretante, e dall’altro, sulla confusione psicotica di indice e simbolo. In una terza e ultima fase, ho messo in questione le implicazioni evolutive dell’analisi peirciana, ipotizzando che, nelle prime fasi dello sviluppo, sia necessaria l’incarnazione della triade semiotica in persone reali, e che nello psicotico potenziale tale incarnazione sia venuta meno.

61

References

Anderson, Douglas. Strands of System: The Philosphy of Charles Peirce. West Lafayette, Ind.:Purdue University Press, 1995.

Benveniste, Émile. Problèmes de linguistiques générale. Paris: Gallimard, 1966. Bleuler, Eugen. Dementia Praecox; or, The Group of Schizophrenias (1911).

Translated by J. Zinkin. New York: International Universities Press, 1950. Colapietro, Vincent M. Peirce’s Approach to the Self: A Semiotic perspective on

Human Subjectivity. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1989. Deely, John. Basics of Semiotics. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Eliot, T. S. The Complete Poems and Plays: 1909 – 1950. New York: Harcourt,

Brace and World, 1962.
Federn, Paul. Ego Psychology and the Psychoses. London: Imago Publishing

Company, 1953.
Fisch, Max. Peirce, Semiotic, and Pragmatism: Essays by Max H. Fisch. Edited

by K. L. Ketner and C.J.W. Kloesel. Bloomington: Indiana University Press,

1986.
Freeman, T., Cameron, J., and McGhie, A. Chronic Schizophrenia. London:

Tavistock Publications, 1958.
Freud, Sigmund. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of

Sigmund Freud. Edited and translated by James Strachey. 24 vols. London:

Hogarth Press, 1953 – 74.
——. “Psycho-Analytic Notes on an Autobiographical Account of a Case of

Paranoia (Dementia Paranoides)” (1911), vol. 12.
Greenlee, Douglas. Peirce’s Concept of Sign. The Hague: Mouton, 1973.

62

Riferimenti bibliografici

Anderson, D. Strands of System: The Philosphy of Charles Peirce, West Lafayette (Indiana), Purdue University Press, 1995.

Benveniste, É. Problèmes de linguistiques générale. Paris, Gallimard, 1966. Trad. it.: Problemi di linguistica generale, a c. di M. Vittoria Giuliani, Milano, Il Saggiatore, 1994, ISBN: 88-428-0140-2.

Bleuler, E. Dementia Praecox; or, The Group of Schizophrenias (1911). Translated by J. Zinkin, New York, International Universities Press, 1950. Trad. it.: Dementia praecox o il gruppo delle schizofrenie, a. c. di L. Cancrini, Roma, La Nuova Italia Scientifica, 1985.

Colapietro, V. M. Peirce’s Approach to the Self: A Semiotic perspective on Human Subjectivity, Albany, State University of New York Press, 1989.

Deely, J. Basics of Semiotics. Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1990. Trad. it.: Basi di semiotica, a c. di M. Leone, Bari, Laterza, 2004, ISBN: 88- 8231-298-4.

Eliot, T. S. The Complete Poems and Plays: 1909 – 1950. New York, Harcourt, Brace and World, 1962. Trad. it.: Opere, a c. di R. Sanesi, Milano, Bompiani, 1986.

Federn, P. Ego Psychology and the Psychoses. London, Imago, 1953.
Fisch, M. Peirce, Semiotic, and Pragmatism: Essays by Max H. Fisch. A c. di K.

L. Ketner e C. J. W. Kloesel, Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1986. Freeman, T., Cameron, J., e McGhie, A. Chronic Schizophrenia. London,

Tavistock Publications, 1958.
Freud, S. Psycho-Analytic Notes on an Autobiographical Account of a Case of

Paranoia (Dementia Paranoides), in The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud. A c. di J. Strachey, 24 vol., London, Hogarth Press, 1953–74 (1911), vol. 12. Trad. it. Il presidente Schreber. Osservazioni psicoanalitiche su un caso di paranoia (dementia paranoides) descritto autobiograficamente, a c. di R. Colorni e P. Veltri, Torino, Boringhieri, 1975.

Greenlee, D. Peirce’s Concept of Sign. The Hague, Mouton, 1973.

63

Harrow, M., and Quinlan, D. Disordered Thinking and Schizophrenic Psychopathology. New York: Gardner Press, 1985.

Houser, Nathan. Introduction to Peirce (1992), xix-xli.
Kerby, Anthony. Narrative and the Self. Bloomington: Indiana University Press,

1991.
Kernberg, Otto. Borderline Conditions and Pathological Narcissism. New York:

Jason Aronson, 1975.
Lakoff, G., and Johnson, M.Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: University of

Chicago Press, 1980.
Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. The Prose of the World. Edited by C. Lefort and

translated by J. O’Neill. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 1973. Muller, John. Beyond the Psychoanalytic Dyad: Developmental Semiotics in

Freud, Peirce, and Lacan. New York: Routledge, 1996.
Peirce, Charles Sanders. The Essential Peirce: Selected Philosophical Writings.

Edited by Nathan Houser and Christian Kloesel. Vol. 1 (1867- 93).

Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1992.
——. “Questions Consequences of Four Incapacities” (1868b). In Peirce (1992),

28 – 55.
——. “Logic as Semiotic: The Theory of Signs” (1897). In Philosophical Writings

of Peirce, edited by J. Buchler, 98 – 119. New York: Dover Publications,

1955.
——. Selected Writings. Edited by P. Wiener. New York: Dover Publications,

1966.
——. Semiotic and Significs: The Correspondence between Charles S. Peirce

and Victoria Lady Welby. Edited by Charles Hardwick. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1977.

64

Harrow, M., e Quinlan, D. Disordered Thinking and Schizophrenic Psychopathology. New York, Gardner Press, 1985.

Houser, N. “Introduction to Peirce” in Peirce, Charles Sanders. The Essential Peirce: Selected Philosophical Writings. A c. di N. Houser and C. Kloesel, Vol. 1 (1867-93), Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1992, p. xix-xli.

Kerby, Anthony. Narrative and the Self. Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1991.

Kernberg, Otto. Borderline Conditions and Pathological Narcissism. New York, Jason Aronson, 1975.

Lakoff, G., e Johnson, M. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1980.

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. The Prose of the World. A c. di C. Lefort e tradotto da J. O’Neill. Evanston (Illinois), Northwestern University Press, 1973. Trad. it. La prosa del mondo, a c. di Marina Sanlorenzo, Roma, Editori Riuniti, 1984, ISBN: 88-359-2757-9.

Muller, John. Beyond the Psychoanalytic Dyad: Developmental Semiotics in Freud, Peirce, and Lacan. New York, Routledge, 1996.

Peirce, Charles Sanders. “Questions Consequences of Four Incapacities” (1868b). In The Essential Peirce: Selected Philosophical Writings. A c. di Nathan Houser e Christian Kloesel, Vol. 1 (1867-93), Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1992. p. 28–55.

——. “Logic as Semiotic: The Theory of Signs” (1897). In Philosophical Writings of Peirce. A c. di J. Buchler, New York, Dover, 1955, p. 98–119.

——. Selected Writings. A c. di P. Wiener, New York, Dover Publications, 1966. ——. Semiotic and Significs: The Correspondence between Charles S. Peirce and Victoria Lady Welby. A c. di Charles Hardwick, Bloomington, Indiana

University Press, 1977.

65

Ricoeur, Paul. “The Metaphorical Process as Cognition, Imagination, and Feeling.” In On Metaphor; edited by Sheldon Sacks, 141 – 58. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978.

——. Time and Narrative. Vol. 1. Translated by K. Mclaughlin and D. Pellauer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984.

——. Oneself as Another. Translated by K. Blamey. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992.

Sass, Louis. Madness and Modernism: Insanity in the Light of Modern Art, Literature, and Thought. New York: Basic Books, 1992.

Sebeok, Thomas. “Indexicality.” In Peirce and Contemporary Thought: Philosophical Inquiries, edited by Kenneth Ketner, 222 – 42. New York: Fordham University Press, 1995.

Short, T. “Peirce’s Semiotic Theory of the Self.” Semiotica 91 (1992): 124. Steiner, G. Real Presences. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989. Stevens, W. Poems. Selected by Samuel French Morse. New York: Vintage

Books, 1959.

66

Ricoeur, Paul. “The Metaphorical Process as Cognition, Imagination, and Feeling.” In On Metaphor. A c. di Sheldon Sacks, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1978, p. 141 – 58.

——. Time and Narrative. Vol. 1. Tradotto da K. Mclaughlin e D. Pellauer, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1984. Trad. it.: Tempo e racconto, vol. 1, a c. di Giuseppe Grampa, Milano, Jaca Book, 1994 [1986], ISBN: 88- 16-40165-6.

——. Oneself as Another. Tradotto da K. Blamey, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1992. Trad. it.: Sé come un altro, a c. di Daniella Iannotta, Milano, Jaca Book, 2005 [1993], ISBN: 88-16-40325-X.

Sass, Louis. Madness and Modernism: Insanity in the Light of Modern Art, Literature, and Thought. New York, Basic Books, 1992.

Sebeok, Thomas. “Indexicality.” In Peirce and Contemporary Thought: Philosophical Inquiries. A c. di Kenneth Ketner, 222 – 42, New York, Fordham University Press, 1995.

Short, T. “Peirce’s Semiotic Theory of the Self.” Semiotica 91 (1992), p.124. Steiner, G. Real Presences. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1989. Trad. it.: Vere presenze, a c. di Claude Béguin, Milano, Garzanti, 1992, ISBN: 88-

11-59881-8.
Stevens, W. Poems. A c. di Samuel French Morse. New York, Vintage Books,

1959. Trad. it.: Mattino domenicale e altre poesie, a c. di Renato Poggioli, Torino, Einaudi, 1988, ISBN: 88-06-11397-6.

67

68

Commento alla traduzione

69

1. Descrizione del materiale

Il saggio da me scelto e tradotto come elaborato finale del percorso di studi in traduzione è tratto dal volume Peirce, Semiotics, and Psychoanalysis; una raccolta di saggi che presentano i concetti fondamentali della semiotica peirciana e si concentrano sulle possibili applicazioni al campo della psicoanalisi e della filosofia. Autore del testo è l’americano James Phillips, psichiatra a New Haven, Connecticut, e docente di psichiatria alla Yale University.

In Peircean Reflections on Psychotic Discourse, James Phillips affronta in modo innovativo la semiotica peirciana focalizzando l’attenzione sulla sua possibile applicazione alla psicosi. Il testo approfondisce i più generali concetti peirciani di «segno», «interpretante» e «oggetto», e il ruolo che questi elementi svolgono nel caso di psicosi e, più precisamente, nei vari tipi di psicosi. Dopo essersi concentrato sulla triade segnica peirciana, l’autore sviluppa e approfondisce il discorso del Sé, la sua funzione all’interno della narrazione quotidiana, come si forma e come si evolve nel passaggio da neonato a adulto, e il ruolo determinante dei genitori – o delle figure di riferimento – in questo processo. Per «narrazione quotidiana» si intende il discorso umano interpersonale nella vita di tutti i giorni osservato da un punto di vista testologico.

2. Testo narrativo versus testo saggistico

Nei due anni di specializzazione in traduzione letteraria i miei studi si sono concentrati principalmente su due tipi di testo: il testo narrativo e il testo saggistico. Queste due categorie di testo sono profondamente diverse tra loro, e la loro diversità comporta un approccio particolare e mirato in fase di traduzione. È bene dunque avere un’idea chiara dei punti in comune ai due testi e, soprattutto, delle loro divergenze.

70

2.1 Il testo narrativo

Il testo narrativo è forse il testo più complesso da descrivere. Si potrebbe definire il testo narrativo una macrocategoria di testi finzionali volti a intrattenere il lettore, all’interno della quale è possibile identificare diversi generi: il racconto, il romanzo, la novella, la fiaba, la favola, il mito, la poesia, il diario. Alla voce «narrare» di un vocabolario della lingua italiana15 si legge «esporre, riferire oralmente, per iscritto nel loro svolgimento temporale, lo svolgersi di fatti reali o fantastici, in modo chiaro e dettagliato»; il testo narrativo è quindi quel testo particolare in cui viene descritto un avvenimento, reale o meno, secondo un ordine temporale.

2.1.1 Lo stile

Come ho appena affermato, lo scopo primario del testo narrativo è intrattenere; sta poi all’autore decidere come impostare il testo, che tono conferire alle proprie parole, su che elementi puntare, e come sviluppare la narrazione. Il testo narrativo è quindi un testo plastico che prende forma nelle mani dello scrittore, il quale lo modella e lo plasma a proprio piacimento. Per catturare l’attenzione del lettore, l’autore, durante la narrazione, può decidere di ricorrere a ogni sorta di espedienti: può giocare sul piano temporale, e spostarsi così dal presente al passato, o addirittura anticipare eventi; può ricorrere a salti di registro, variando così le scelte sintattiche e lessicali, o presentare personaggi ben caratterizzati e definirli attraverso descrizioni accurate. In genere il testo narrativo, se di buon livello, ha una propria eleganza formale ed è curato nei minimi dettagli. Compito del traduttore è attenersi il più possibile alle scelte dell’autore e renderle al meglio nella sua traduzione.

15

De Mauro:2000

71

2.1.2 Il linguaggio

Data la libertà che contraddistingue il testo narrativo non si può parlare di un linguaggio “tipico” o “ricorrente”. L’autore, narrando, fa un uso libero (e proprio) della parola, può coniare neologismi o utilizzare espressioni ormai cadute in disuso, qualora lo ritenesse necessario, magari per rendere al meglio l’atmosfera di tempi lontani. Il testo narrativo non contiene in genere termini, eppure in molti casi alcune parole hanno la medesima funzione, in quanto diventano parole chiave e si trasformano in rimandi intratestuali che vanno individuati e rispettati. Può inoltre capitare che all’interno di un romanzo, per esempio, compaia la descrizione di un oggetto, una macchina, un animale, e che si presentino quindi dei termini veri e propri.

2.1.3 Elementi del testo narrativo

Il testo narrativo, per essere definito tale, presenta in genere alcuni elementi fondamentali legati alla formula più semplice che sta alla base di ogni narrazione: qualcuno fa qualcosa in un certo momento; è come viene narrato questo «qualcosa» a fare la differenza. La più grande distinzione che può essere fatta all’interno di un testo narrativo è quella tra «fabula» (storia) e «intreccio» (discorso); per fabula si intende la serie di eventi secondo il normale ordine cronologico, per intreccio si intende invece la scelta dell’autore di disporre questi avvenimenti (può quindi sovvertire il normale ordine cronologico). Gli eventi seguono generalmente uno schema narrativo (pressoché standard nei romanzi tradizionali): una situazione iniziale di equilibrio viene turbata fino a raggiungere un culmine di tensione per poi risolversi in un equilibrio finale, non necessariamente positivo. All’interno dello spazio si muovono dei personaggi, più o meno definiti, che interagiscono tra loro attraverso dialoghi, è compito del narratore cedere di volta in volta la parola, e il punto di vista, ai personaggi. Ogni personaggio può essere definito caratterialmente anche attraverso alla descrizione che ne viene fatta e alle parole che escono dalla sua bocca.

72

È nel passaggio da un piano temporale all’altro, nel cambiamento del punto di vista e nella modalità di esprimere i pensieri dei personaggi e del narratore che sta la maestria dello scrittore; compito del traduttore, e in questo si riscontra la sua abilità, è riconoscere queste peripezie narrative e rispettarle.

Più valore artistico viene riconosciuto al prototesto narrativo, meno possibilità di intervento avrà il traduttore in fase di narrazione. In altri casi, quando il testo che si accinge ha tradurre non ha valenze letterarie e, anzi, è scritto frettolosamente e con poca accuratezza, può spettare al traduttore occuparsi di inserire accorgimenti per renderlo più fruibile e, possibilmente, migliore.

2.2 Il testo saggistico

Il testo saggistico spesso non viene preso abbastanza in considerazione; è infatti tendenza diffusa, generalmente, distinguere i testi in ”letterari” e “tecnici”. Dal momento che non appartiene né alla categoria dei testi narrativi, né a quella dei testi scientifici, tecnici, o comunque prettamente settoriali, il testo saggistico è da considerarsi un testo “ibrido”, con molte peculiarità simili ai tipi di testo appena nominati, e quindi con particolari ripercussioni inevitabili sulla strategia traduttiva da applicare. Un saggio può infatti avere lo stesso peso e la stessa valenza artistica di un racconto, con la stessa cura nello stile e un’estrema accuratezza per quanto riguarda lo stile e la scelta dei vocaboli. È però vero che esistono saggi che si rivolgono agli “addetti ai lavori” e che trattano quindi argomenti scientifici o tecnici con una terminologia accurata e precisa, che in traduzione va curata.

2.2.1 Lo stile

Il testo saggistico ha un’identità che cambia a seconda dello scopo che si prefigge e del lettore a cui aspira a rivolgersi. Il tema centrale del saggio è, in genere, legato a un campo del sapere; può quindi trattare di politica, filosofia, scienza, cultura. All’autore di un testo saggistico non è richiesto, solitamente, inserire citazioni o argomentare al meglio le sue teorie; spesso questi può dare

73

per scontati molti concetti, scegliendo di non esprimerli. È compito del lettore documentarsi e fare ricerche per capire al meglio quanto viene esposto nel saggio. Ciò che distingue un saggio da un testo scientifico è, spesso, la cura del linguaggio e dello stile. È pur vero che può accadere che a scrivere saggi siano quegli esperti che, per professione, non si occupano di scrittura e di conseguenza i loro scritti risultano oscuri e dalla lettura difficile.

Sebbene il testo saggistico possa assumere le più svariate forme, ed essere quindi scritto con l’estro più creativo o con rigore e freddezza scientifica, esistono punti fissi e quasi inalienabili alla base della stesura di un saggio.
Il primo punto fermo del testo saggistico è il suo obiettivo. Il saggio, infatti, non sempre mira soltanto a intrattenere il lettore, bensì a informarlo. L’autore, scrivendo, cerca di approfondire un argomento sviluppandolo con ordine e coerenza. Il saggio è pertanto un testo non finzionale caratterizzato da uno stile fortemente codificato coerente alla struttura logico-consequenziale del discorso, stile che, considerato l’elevato tasso di formalità, generalmente lo accomuna ai testi scientifici

2.2.2. Il linguaggio

Il saggio può apparire spesso freddo e “asettico”, scarsamente personalizzato e originale dal punto di vista del linguaggio; tuttavia, esistono saggi di tipo divulgativo che sono destinati a un pubblico più ampio, ed è proprio questo tipo di saggi che può contenere un maggior tasso di creatività e originalità per quanto riguarda stile e linguaggio.

Testi saggistici dalla valenza fortemente scientifica tendono a includere numerosi termini tecnici-scientifici estremamente precisi, che non possono essere sostituiti in alcun modo. In fase di traduzione, il traduttore dovrà adoperarsi per ricercare il termine, uno e uno soltanto, che gli corrisponda, avvalendosi della consultazione di glossari e memorie di traduzione. Dal momento che non si tratta di un testo esclusivamente connotativo né tanto meno evocativo, il saggio non vuole stimolare i sensi del lettore (eccezione fatta per i saggi poetici o di approfondimento su qualche esponente del mondo

74

letterario) ma si limita a esporre una tesi. Può capitare che il saggio rimandi ad altri testi, magari portando esempi e citazioni estratte da altre opere per avvalorare la tesi che l’autore vuole sviluppare. In questo caso il traduttore dovrà individuare i rimandi intertestuali impliciti o espliciti e tradurli al meglio qualora non fossero già tradotti, oppure individuare le traduzioni in circolazione nel proprio paese e riportare la versione “ufficiale”. Compito del traduttore è inoltre tradurre i riferimenti bibliografici del prototesto indicando la traduzione di cui si è servito durante il suo lavoro.

Per quanto riguarda il testo saggistico, il traduttore può impostare la propria strategia traduttiva a seconda del lettore modello che si prefigura: può scegliere infatti di conferire al saggio un tono meno solenne e più chiaro per renderlo accessibile a una potenziale vasta porzione di pubblico; può altrimenti attenersi a un linguaggio più tecnico e formale se stabilisce che il pubblico cui è destinato il saggio è costituito da esperti e uomini di scienza. Di certo, il saggio, così come il testo narrativo, non può rivolgersi alle persone non alfabetizzate, che possono fruire soltanto di testi multimediali quali film o audiolibri16.

3. Charles Sanders Peirce e il segno

L’apporto di Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914) alla moderna semiotica inizia a essere sempre più preso in considerazione anche da esponenti di altre discipline, sia umanistiche che scientifiche, grazie alle applicazioni che la semiotica peirciana può avere nelle più svariate discipline. È questo il caso del testo da me tradotto, in cui la teoria di Peirce riguardante il segno, e con essa il ruolo dell’interpretante, è stata applicata al discorso psicotico e, nello specifico, a casi di soggetti schizofrenici o paranoidi. Il contributo significativo di Peirce consiste proprio nel considerare il segno un elemento fondamentale attorno al quale si forma il nostro pensiero: noi siamo segni, pensiamo attraverso segni, e i nostri pensieri non sono nient’altro che un continuum di semiosi in cui un

16

Per ulteriori chiarimenti sulle caratteristiche del testo saggistico rimando a Osimo 2008.

75

oggetto (nel senso peirciano del termine) diventa il segno del pensiero successivo. Peirce sostiene infatti che:

[...] non vi è alcun elemento della coscienza umana che non abbia qualcosa che gli corrisponda nella parola; e la ragione è ovvia. È che la parola o segno che l’uomo usa è l’uomo stesso. Poiché, come il fatto che ogni pensiero è un segno, considerato insieme al fatto che la vita è una concatenazione di pensieri, prova che l’uomo è un segno; così, [il fatto] che ogni pensiero è un segno esterno prova che l’uomo è un segno esterno. Vale a dire che l’uomo e il segno esterno sono identici, nello stesso senso in cui sono identiche le parole homo e uomo. Il mio linguaggio è pertanto la somma totale di me stesso, poiché l’uomo è il pensiero17.

Peirce definisce il segno come qualcosa che secondo qualcuno sta per qualcosa e crea nella mente di quella persona un segno equivalente, o forse più evoluto, che Peirce stesso chiama «interpretante». Ciò a cui rimanda il segno è il suo «oggetto». Il segno, secondo Peirce, è quindi un elemento triadico dalla seguente struttura:

17

[...] there is no element whatever of man’s consciousness which has not something corresponding to it in the word; and the reason is obvious. It is that the word or sign which man uses is the man himself. For, as the fact that every thought is a sign, taken in conjunction with the fact that life is a train of thought, proves that man is a sign; so, that every thought is an external sign, proves that man is an external sign. That is to say, the man and the external sign

76

Peirce non si limita a questa definizione di segni ma, forse affezionato al numero tre, identifica tre classi segniche ben definite: icona, indice, e simbolo18.

3.1 Icona

Peirce definisce «icona» un segno che si riferisce all’oggetto che vuole rappresentare in virtù di una somiglianza; spetta a chi osserva (o ascolta) cogliere questa somiglianza e collegare il segno all’oggetto. Sono esempi di icona i ritratti, i disegni, gli ideogrammi.

3.2 Indice

Secondo Peirce un «indice» è un segno che si riferisce all’oggetto a cui rimanda in virtù del fatto che è realmente determinato da quell’oggetto, ne è influenzato. Il rapporto tra il segno in questione e il suo oggetto non si basa su una somiglianza. L’esempio più classico è quello del fumo (segno) che denota la presenza del fuoco (l’oggetto), che lo ha generato.

3.3 Simbolo

La definizione che Peirce dà di «simbolo» è quella di un segno che si riferisce all’oggetto che denota in virtù di una legge che stabilisce che quel simbolo deve essere interpretato come facente riferimento a quell’oggetto. La relazione tra il segno e il suo oggetto è quindi prettamente convenzionale, culturospecifica, e soggettiva.

are identical, in the same sense in which the words homo and man are identical. Thus my

language is the sum total of myself; for the man is the thought (CP 5.314).

18

Si vedano a tale proposito i paragrafi 2.247, 2.248, e 2.249 dei Collected Papers di Peirce.

77

4. Lo psicotico e il segno

Quanto ho affermato finora è valido in una situazione non patologica, ovvero nel caso di individui nel pieno delle proprie facoltà mentali. È pertanto palese il fatto che la triade segnica peirciana, il ruolo dell’interpretante, e la distinzione dei vari tipi di segni entrino in crisi nel caso di soggetti psicotici.

Secondo un accreditato dizionario di psicoanalisi, la psicosi è una

Forma di disturbo mentale caratterizzato da una notevole regressione dell’Io e della libido con conseguente grave disorganizzazione della personalità. Le psicosi si dividono in due gruppi, quelle organiche e quelle funzionali. Quelle della prima categoria sono secondarie a malattia fisica (per esempio paresi generale da sifilide, tumore del cervello, arteriosclerosi); le seconde sono connesse principalmente a fattori psicosociali, sebbene vi possano essere anche predisposizioni biologiche. Le principali psicosi funzionali sono i disturbi dell’affettività (psicosi maniaco-depressiva) e i disturbi del pensiero (schizofrenia e paranoia)19.

È possibile dare un’interpretazione semiotica della psicosi. Lo psicotico è un soggetto dall’Io non ben definito né sviluppato; come afferma Phillips, in caso di psicosi si ha «il crollo di una rete di segni che costituisce il Sé» (2000:25): lo psicotico non sa chi è, e non sa chi o cosa non è. Per confermare ulteriormente questo concetto ricordo infatti che, di frequente, accade che soggetti psicotici si esprimano in terza persona quando vogliono parlare di sé20. Questa indeterminatezza si ripercuote inoltre verso l’esterno e genera l’impossibilità del paziente di distinguere il segno da quello che intende significare (il suo oggetto). Proseguendo la lettura della definizione appena citata si legge:

19 20

Burness, E. Moore 1993 Phillips 2000:25

78

[...] La concettualizzazione freudiana della psicopatologia delle psicosi mette in evidenza una sostanziale unità tra i processi mentali delle psicosi e delle nevrosi. Tuttavia Freud mise in risalto anche certe differenze importanti. Una è che l’individuo psicotico è inconsciamente fissato a un livello precedente di sviluppo libidico, la fase narcisistica. Ciò conduce, mediante la regressione, alla caratteristica più importante nello sviluppo della psicosi: il cambiamento delle relazioni del paziente con le persone e gli oggetti del suo ambiente. In certi casi il paziente vede gli altri isolati e distaccati o anche fortemente ostili. Ciò solitamente è collegato all’idea che il mondo e le persone sono in qualche modo cambiati, e a volte la fantasia si estende fino a pensare che il mondo sia distrutto e tutti siano irreali. Freud riteneva che questi sintomi rappresentassero la rottura del paziente con la realtà e la caratteristica più tipica delle psicosi»21.

Lo schizofrenico, in quanto psicotico, si confronta quindi con parole-cose ma non riesce ad andare oltre; è il caso dell’esempio del paziente che, invitato a mangiare, si sofferma sulla cosa-forchetta e la analizza non riuscendo a passare alla fase successiva, ovvero a mangiare un boccone di cibo per mezzo della forchetta (2000:20). Un caso particolare di psicosi è quello del paranoide, il quale non solo si sofferma sulle parole-segno o sulle cose-segno ma le percepisce come elemento negativo nei suoi confronti. Il soggetto percepisce tutto ciò che lo circonda – persone, cose, animali, rumori – come un “nemico”, un elemento ostile nei suoi confronti, e si ferma a questo livello. È quindi evidente come, in caso di psicosi, non ci sia una percezione del segno come entità che svolge un ruolo di mediazione tra il suo interpretante e il suo oggetto, bensì come entità a sé stante, incomprensibile o minacciosa che sia.

Alla luce di quanto detto finora è possibile trarre una conclusione, e cioè che per innescare il processo di semiosi attraverso il segno occorre trascenderlo, e giungere così – attraverso un’entità mentale (l’interpretante) – al suo oggetto.

21

Burness, E. Moore 1993

79

Come sostiene Phillips: «La condizione comune dei segni è quindi la trasparenza. Dal momento che noi guardiamo al mondo attraverso i segni non prestiamo attenzione ai segni» (2000:17). Nella psicosi questa trasparenza viene meno: il soggetto psicotico si focalizza sul segno e non riesce a figurarsi nessun interpretante, né tanto meno riesce a comprenderne il senso. Il segno diventa opaco e il soggetto psicotico si ferma al Primo percependolo come «cosa» e facendo crollare il processo di semiosi; l’esteriorità del segno viene dunque «portata al suo estremo, e il segno-pensiero si materializza in entità del mondo esterno: voci di altri, ordini dall’alto [...]» (2000:20). Una situazione di questo tipo è, per lo psicotico, un’esperienza terrificante: il soggetto è sopraffatto dalla cosa-segno. Cose del mondo che sono comunemente insignificanti vengono percepite in modo amplificato ed esagerato dal soggetto psicotico, il quale le investe di significato accresciuto (e distorto).

5. Il traduttore e il segno

Nello svolgere la sua professione capita al traduttore di ritrovarsi a riflettere a lungo su parole o termini per scegliere quale inserire nella propria traduzione. Accade dunque che, riflettendo, il traduttore si concentri sulla parola in quanto segno, e non sull’oggetto a cui rimanda. La parola-segno perde così trasparenza e il traduttore si ferma al primo elemento della semiosi: il segno vero e proprio. Come nel caso dello psicotico, nel caso di metalinguaggio, crolla il processo di significazione.

Una riflessione sulla parola in sé di questo tipo può essere esemplificata dal seguente schema distorto della famosa triade di Peirce.

80

6. Analisi del prototesto

Alla luce di quanto affermato nel paragrafo 2 posso sostenere che il testo da me tradotto appartiene alla categoria dei testi saggistici. Tuttavia, Peircean Reflections on Psychotic Discourse è da considerarsi un saggio “atipico”, dal momento che contiene numerose citazioni e rimandi ad altre opere. Il lettore modello a cui si rivolge l’autore del testo, considerato anche il volume all’interno del quale il saggio è racchiuso, è una persona istruita che si occupa di psicologia o psichiatria, che possiede inoltre delle solide basi filosofiche, o comunque umanistiche, e che conosce i fondamenti della dottrina di Peirce, dal momento che molto viene lasciato non detto. Il saggio è scritto da una persona colta e istruita ma che, tuttavia, di professione non si occupa di scrittura: l’aspetto formale soccombe dunque al contenuto; l’autore ha deciso di concentrarsi su cosa espone, e non su come lo fa. Nel testo sono infatti presenti forti salti di registro: si passa da espressioni come «inexhaustible reservoir of gesture» (2000:21) e «perspicuous remarks» (2000:31) a espressioni più colloquali come per esempio: «As Pierce puts it…» (2000:29). Molte volte, proprio per come sono espressi i concetti, è difficile comprendere cosa vuole esprimere l’autore. In questi casi non bisogna concentrarsi sulla struttura della frase in sé, ma piuttosto occorre cercare di interpretarla grazie

81

anche al co-testo22 in cui è inserita. Un altro elemento che avvalora la mia tesi sull’autore è il continuo passaggio che questi, forse inavvertitamente, compie dalla prima persona singolare alla prima persona plurale. Il testo esordisce con una forma impersonale «this Peircean reflection on psychosis will proceed on two levels» (2000:16) per poi proseguire con «at this level our discussion will move…» e «we will end…» (ibidem), e terminare dopo poche righe con «finally [...] I attempt to look at the semiotic dimension of psychotic thinking» (2000:17). Questa frammentarietà nella scelta del soggetto ricorre di continuo nel testo; è compito del traduttore decidere come comportarsi e a che linea attenersi in fase di traduzione.

7. La strategia traduttiva

Dopo aver letto più volte il testo e averne bene inquadrato contenuto e lettore modello, ho stabilito una linea da seguire in fase di traduzione. Per prima cosa ho deciso di conservare il linguaggio specifico e di tradurre tutti termini con la massima accuratezza. Ho ritenuto necessario rendere il testo il più chiaro e semplice possibile, in modo che il testo, nonostante i contenuti, risultasse comprensibile a una porzione di pubblico più ampia. La mia «dominante» è stata pertanto la valenza scientifica del testo accompagnata alla sua possibile fruibilità. Il saggio presenta numerosi rimandi intertestuali a svariate discipline, con un occhio di riguardo al campo della filosofia. Il lettore mediamente istruito, o comunque specializzato in altre discipline, potrebbe trovare faticosa la lettura del testo e avere spesso l’impressione di non riuscire a coglierne il senso. Per ovviare alla presenza di questo «residuo» è possibile ricorrere a note a piè di pagina o a un qualsiasi apparato metatestuale (volendo, anche all’inserimento di un glossario); ho tuttavia scelto di lasciare inespresso il sottinteso per rispettare la scelta dell’autore. Il “lettore medio”23 italiano si trova pertanto nella stessa condizione del “lettore medio” inglese: entrambi possono decidere se

22

Per «co-testo» si intende la parte di testo che precede o segue l’enunciato in questione.

82

fermarsi a una lettura superficiale del testo o se approfondire autonomamente i concetti in esso contenuti consultando enciclopedie o manuali e ricorrendo magari alla bibliografia inserita dall’autore. Se James Phillips, infatti, avesse deciso di scrivere un testo comprensibile a tutti, allora lui stesso avrebbe inserito note a piè di pagina oppure si sarebbe forse concentrato maggiormente sulla scelta delle parole.

8. I problemi traduttivi

In fase di traduzione mi sono ritrovata a dover affrontare più problemi di quanti ne avessi individuati con la prima lettura del testo. Una prima lettura, sebbene attenta e eseguita con occhio critico, non è mai tanto approfondita quanto l’analisi del testo che si compie quando si traduce, momento in cui ci si scontra con le più diverse difficoltà: dalla scelta dei vocaboli, alla coerenza del testo, dal registro all’impaginazione.

8.1 Capire prima di tradurre

Il primo problema reale avuto confrontandomi con il testo è stato afferrare il contenuto del testo in modo che mi fosse chiaro del tutto. Il saggio concentra in poche pagine concetti di filosofia e psicoanalisi, nonché di semiotica, temi con i quali, purtroppo, non ho molta dimestichezza. Considerate quindi le mie limitate conoscenze sugli argomenti ho ritenuto necessario documentarmi ricorrendo a ogni mezzo di informazione possibile: ho infatti consultato persone esperte in materia nonché siti internet specifici, manuali, enciclopedie e dizionari settoriali. Dopo questa prima fase ho proceduto con la traduzione vera e propria, scontrandomi con i problemi che man mano mi si presentavano.

23

Per «lettore medio» intendo la persona adulta mediamente istruita che fruisce del testo.

83

8.2 Il linguaggio appropriato

Gli elementi del testo che mi hanno creato maggiori difficoltà sono stati forse i termini settoriali legati alla psicoanalisi come, per esempio, i nomi dei vari disturbi mentali e dei vari tipi di psicosi, quali psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder, psychotically depressed, o espressioni come self-representation, libidinal decathexis, e parole ricorrenti nel gergo piscoanalitico come speech, thought, discourse, language, e thinking, e la necessità di distinguerle tra loro ove possibile. In ciascuno di questi casi ho verificato sempre che fonti attendibili attestassero il traducente da me individuato. È il caso dell’espressione – in apparenza molto banale – ideas of reference, da me tradotta come «idee di riferimento». Per avere conferma della mia traduzione ho provato come prima cosa a inserire entrambe le locuzioni – quella inglese e quella italiana – e ho verificato che il mio «idee di riferimento» era stato usato per tradurre ideas of reference nel titolo di un saggio del 1962 intitolato Hallucinations, delusions, and ideas of reference treated with psychotherapy (Allucinazioni, deliri e idee di riferimento trattati con la psicoterapia) e contenuto nell’American Journal of Psychoterapy24. Per essere del tutto sicura di quanto mi accingevo a scrivere ho consultato un dizionario di psicologia25, nel quale, alla voce «idea» si legge la seguente definizione di «idea di riferimento»:

[...] interpretazione di gesti, parole, opinioni, notizie di per sé indifferenti come se contenessero riferimenti al soggetto interpretante. Queste idee non cedono alla critica e all’evidenza, e nei casi di paranoia, hanno un contenuto persecutorio, nei casi di depressione un contenuto colpevolizzante che il soggetto ritiene meritato.

Ho dunque capito che «idee di riferimento» si inseriva perfettamente nel co- testo: l’autore ha infatti utilizzato questa locuzione illustrando il caso di un paziente psicotico che «investe di significatività accresciuta e distorta

24
American Journal of Psychotherapy 16, New York, 1962, ISSN 0002-9564, p. 52-60.

Arieti, S. Hallucinations, delusions, and ideas of reference treated with psychotherapy, in

84

comunicazioni esterne» (2000:21). Phillips prosegue sostenendo che il paziente tratta l’interno come esterno, e l’esterno come interno e che «concentrarsi [...] sull’uso dei segni profondamente confuso di quest’uomo, descrive, da un punto di vista semiotico, quello che la psichiatria generale chiamerebbe inserimento di pensieri e idee di riferimento» (ibidem).

8.2.1 Speech, language, e discourse

Alcune parole ricorrenti nel saggio sono speech, language, e discourse, che, a seconda dell’uso che l’autore ne fa, possono essere tradotte in modo diverso e, pertanto, meritano un approfondimento a parte.
È bene innanzitutto avere presente cosa si intende per «lingua» «linguaggio» e «discorso». Alla voce «lingua» del Dizionario della lingua italiana26 si legge:

parlata, idioma, ant. favella, loquela, talora linguaggio come facoltà umana; più spesso modo di parlare peculiare di una comunità umana, appreso dagli individui (in condizioni normali) fin dai primi mesi di vita, affiancato, per le popolazioni alfabetizzate, da modalità ortografiche e di stile connesse alla pratica dello scrivere e del leggere; nelle innumeri manifestazioni di tale modo di parlare e di scrivere si riconosce la presenza di un vocabolario comune alla generalità dei parlanti della comunità.

La «lingua» è dunque ciò che permette a ogni individuo di comunicare (scrivendo o parlando) con chi appartiene alla sua stessa comunità. E si distingue dal «linguaggio» che, secondo il Dizionario di psicologia27 è un

Insieme di codici che permettono di trasmettere, conservare ed elaborare informazioni tramite segni intersoggettivi in grado di significare altro da sé. Esso, pur essendo dislocato rispetto

25 26 27

Galimberti, U. 1994 De Mauro 2000 Galimberti, U. 1994

85

all’immediatezza sensibile del segno, da questo è richiamato mediante l’atto del denotare e del connotare. [...] il linguaggio umano [...] si evolve nel corso della vita dell’individuo.

Una persona, attraverso il linguaggio, può comunicare anche con persone che non appartengono alla stessa cultura. Si parla infatti anche di «linguaggio del corpo», poiché anche attraverso i gesti si può significare qualcosa a qualcuno. Con «discorso» si intende invece:

esposizione di un pensiero, di un’idea, di una tesi per mezzo della parola28.

In ambito semiotico si ricorre al termine «discorso» quando si desidera mettere in risalto che ci si occupa non del linguaggio inteso come codice, come dizionario, ma come attualizzazione pratica concreta di quel linguaggio. Quindi, così come si può dire «il discorso pronunciato da X in una certa occasione» si può anche dire «il discorso psicotico» sottintendendo che si fa riferimento non a un singolo discorso, ma al modo di attualizzare il linguaggio da parte di uno psicotico. In questo saggio non si usano in modo rigido i termini «discorso» e «linguaggio», perciò, in certi casi, si ricorre a quell’accezione di «linguaggio» che non denota tecnicamente un codice ma, più discorsivamente, si riferisce appunto al modo di esprimersi di un gruppo di persone. Alla luce di queste considerazioni ho deciso di comportarmi liberamente e di scegliere, di volta in volta, che traducente utilizzare per rendere al meglio il concetto espresso dall’autore; «discorso» traduce quindi non solo discourse, ma anche speech e language, speech viene tradotto anche come parola, e language come linguaggio.

28

De Mauro 2000

86

8.2.2 Thing e Object

Desidero soffermarmi inoltre sulle parole thing e object dal momento che più volte mi sono ritrovata a rivedere le mie scelte in proposito. Molto spesso nel testo si parla di cose comuni – sedie, forchette, termometri, eccetera – come di things. Utilizzare la parola «cosa» all’interno di un saggio scientifico di questo tipo, mi sembra uno smacco al registro scelto; avrei infatti preferito ricorrere al quasi corrispondente «oggetto». Tuttavia mi sono dovuta arrendere e ho dovuto utilizzare «cosa» dal momento che «oggetto» in alcune parti del testo avrebbe costituito una fonte di ambiguità. Dal momento che il saggio tratta anche di semiotica, nel testo ricorrono di continuo i termini peirciani «segno», «interpretante», e «oggetto», appunto. Per distinguere dunque quello che è un oggetto comune, dall’oggetto peirciano (il «Secondo» nella triade di Peirce) ho tradotto thing con «cosa». In un punto del testo in particolare questa mia scelta traduttiva ha trovato riscontro, e cioè quando l’autore, parlando di un soggetto schizofrenico, afferma che questi «diventa ben consapevole delle sue parole o dei suoi gesti in quanto parole o gesti» e che dunque le parole o i gesti «rivelano improvvisamente la loro natura di segni – o di cose semiotiche» (2000:19). In presenza dell’aggettivo «semiotico» è impossibile tradurre thing con «oggetto», poiché si verrebbe a creare una grossa ambiguità che avrebbe creato confusione nella mente del lettore.

8.3. Eleganza formale versus aderenza all’originale

Molti critici puntano il dito contro il traduttore e la sua versione attaccandosi al concetto di “fedeltà”. Partendo dal presupposto che non si può parlare di “fedeltà” posso argomentare molte mie scelte traduttive. Come ho già affermato la dominante sulla quale mi sono concentrata maggiormente è stata il rispetto del contenuto e, di conseguenza, di tutti i termini specifici, affinché non risultassero screditati i concetti espressi dall’autore. Ho tuttavia ritenuto importante conferire uniformità al testo, soprattutto per quanto riguarda il registro, in modo che avesse una maggiore dignità; a questo è dovuta la mia

87

decisione di non rispettare totalmente il modo di esprimersi dell’autore: così facendo sono intervenuta soltanto su quelle espressioni macchinose o ridondanti che si presentavano. Per tradurre parole come affirmation, statement, sentence, pronounciation, utterance, declaration, che non vanno considerate come parole chiave da conservare rigorosamente, sono ricorsa a traducenti diversi che di volta in volta meglio si adattavano al contesto, intervenendo in certi casi anche sulla sintassi.

Anche nel caso degli aggettivi actual e real, per esempio, non ho scelto a priori un traducente per l’uno e l’altro, ma di volta in volta ho deciso come tradurli; spesso il co-testo mi ha spinta a inserire ripetizioni usando lo stesso traducente per i due aggettivi.

8.4 Le citazioni

Grazie agli OPAC (online public access catalogue) delle varie biblioteche, nonché a quello del Sistema Bibliotecario Nazionale, sono riuscita a recuperare le edizioni italiane delle opere citate nel saggio, e ho potuto così inserire le traduzioni “ufficiali” esistenti. Le citazioni delle opere di Peirce hanno costituito per me la principale difficoltà. In Italia esistono infatti numerose edizioni degli scritti di Peirce, nessuna completa, ed esistono svariati volumi che comprendono una selezione di saggi diversi. Prima di scegliere quale versione inserire nel testo ho passato in rassegna tre volumi29 contenenti i saggi che mi interessavano. Dopo un’attenta analisi ho deciso di tradurre di mio pugno le citazioni riportate nel testo dal momento che in ognuna delle versioni da me esaminate presentava qualche lacuna, seppur minima a volte; lacuna che ho cercato di colmare nel massimo rispetto dell’originale.

29

Peirce, C.S. 1978; 2003; 2005

88

8.4.1 Alcune traduzioni a confronto

Di seguito riporto una tabella con la quale raffronto alcune citazioni tradotte estratte dalle tre edizioni italiane da me reperite in fase di traduzione per mostrare come differiscano tra loro. Le citazioni che riporto sono tratte dal saggio Questions Concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man. Per ultima inserisco la mia variante per mostare dove sono intervenuta e cosa ho modificato rispetto alle altre traduzioni, sulla base di questo piccolo estratto è possibile intuire il mio atteggiamento nel tradurre le citazioni delle opere di Peirce.

P = prototesto
M = metatesto
M1 = Scritti di filosofia, a cura di William J. Callaghan M2 = Scritti scelti, a cura di Giovanni Maddalena
M3 = Opere, a cura di Massimo Bonfantini

P

Questions Concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man

If we seek the light of external facts, the only cases of thought which we can find are of thought in signs. Plainly, no other thought can be evidenced by external facts. But we have seen that only by external facts can thought be known at all. The only thought, then, which can possibly be cognized is thought in signs. But thought wich cannot be cognized does not exist. All thought, therefore, must necessarily be in signs.

[...]

A child hears it said that the stove is hot. But it is not, he says; and indeed, that central body is not touching it, and only what that thouches is hot or cold. But hetouches it, and finds the testimony confirmed in a striking way. Thus, he becomes aware of ignorance, and it is necessary to suppose a self in which this ignorance can inhere. So testimony gives the first dawning of self-consciousness.

89

M1

Questioni concernenti certe pretese facoltà umane

Se cerchiamo la luce dei fatti esterni, i soli casi di pensiero che possiamo reperire sono casi di pensiero in segni. Ovviamente, nessun altro pensiero può essere evidenziato da fatti esterni. Ma abbiamo visto che si può conoscere il pensiero solo da fatti esterni. Allora il solo pensiero che sia assolutamente possibile conoscere è pensiero in segni. Ma il pensiero che non può essere conosciuto non esiste. Ogni pensiero perciò deve necessariamente essere pensiero in segni.

[...]

Un bambino ode dire che il fornello è caldo. Ma non lo è, egli dice; e, in verità, quel corpo centrale non lo sta toccando e solo ciò che quello tocca è caldo o freddo. Egli lo tocca, però, e trova confermata in maniera essenziale la testimonianza. In questo modo egli diviene consapevole dell’ignoranza, ed è necessario suppore un io a cui questo non sapere possa inerire. La testimonianza produce così il primo inizio dell’autocoscienza.

M2

Questioni riguardo a certe pretese capacità umane

Se guardiamo ai fatti esteriori, i soli casi di pensiero che possiamo rinvenire sono di pensieri in forma di segni. È chiaro chei fatti esteriori non mettono in luce alcun altro pensiero. Ma abbiamo visto che ilpensiero può essre conosciuto solo ed esclusivamente per fatti esteriori. Il solo pensiero, allora, che può essere conosciuto è il pensiero attraverso i segni. Ma il pensiero che non può essre conosciuto non esiste, quindi tutto il pensiero deve necessariamente essere per segni.

[...]

Un bambino sente dire che la stufa è calda. Non è vero, egli dice; in effetti, il corpo centrale non la sta toccando e solo ciò che esso tocca può essere caldo o freddo. Allora egli la tocca e scopre che la testimonianza viene dolorosamente confermata. Così diventa consapevole dell’ignoranza ed è necessario supporre un io al quale questa ignoranza possa inerire. In questo modo la testimonianza è all’origine dell’autocoscienza.

90

M3

Questioni concernenti certe pretese facoltà umane

Se ci basiamo sui fatti esterni, i soli casi di pensiero che possiamo trovare sono quelli di pensiero in segni. È chiaro che nessun altro pensiero può essere evidenziato da fatti esterni. Ma abbiamo visto che il pensiero si può conoscere solamente attraverso i fatti esterni. Dunque, il solo pensiero che è possibile conoscere è, senza eccezione, il pensiero in segni. Ma il pensiero che non può essere conosciuto non esiste. Perciò ogni pensiero deve necessariamente essere pensiero in segni.

[...]

Un bimbo sente dire che la stufa è calda. Ma non è vero, egli dice; e, infatti, quell’altro corpo centrale che gli sta parlando non la sta toccando, e solo ciò che si tocca è caldo o freddo. Allora il bambino la tocca, e scopre che la testimonianza è dolorosamente confermata. Così, diventa consapevole dell’ignoranza, ed è necessario supporre un io cui questa ignoranza possa inerire. In tal modo la testimonianza comporta il primo avvio dell’autocoscienza.

M4

Se cerchiamo la luce dei fatti esterni, i soli casi di pensiero che possiamo individuare sono casi di pensiero in segni. È evidente che nessun altro pensiero può essere evidenziato da fatti esterni. Ma abbiamo visto che è possibile comprendere il pensiero soltanto attraverso fatti esterni. Dunque, il solo pensiero che può forse essere conosciuto è il pensiero in segni. Ma il pensiero che non può essere conosciuto non esiste. Ogni pensiero deve pertanto essere necessariamente in segni

[...]

Un bambino sente dire che la stufa è calda. Ma non è vero, dice; e, infatti, quel corpo centrale non la sta toccando, e soltanto ciò che si tocca è caldo o freddo. Tuttavia lo tocca e trova confermata la testimonianza in modo sorprendente. [Il bambino] diviene così consapevole dell’ignoranza, ed è necessario supporre un sé a cui questa ignoranza possa inerire. La testimonianza pone le basi della coscienza di sé.

91

Risulta evidente come la prima traduzione (M1), nonché la più datata, sia molto aderente all’originale, spesso a tal punto da rendere difficoltosa la lettura. Le altre due traduzioni (M2 e M3), più recenti, sono invece più scorrevoli; tuttavia M2 sembra essere molto più appropriante e meno aderente all’originale. M3, nonostante sia la traduzione migliore tra le tre da me individuate, presenta alcune lacune (seppur minime) che ho cercato di integrare al meglio proponendo una mia traduzione (M4).

9. Interventi redazionali

Una volta ultimata la traduzione non ho ritenuto concluso il mio lavoro; mi sono infatti preoccupata di intervenire su alcuni aspetti, spesso considerati secondari, che fanno la differenza.
Il primo impatto che si ha con un prodotto è sempre un impatto visivo; è pertanto significativo intervenire sull’aspetto “estetico” del testo e assicurarsi che sia mantenuta una certa coerenza nell’aspetto formale. Per quanto riguarda questo saggio sono dovuta intervenire principalmente laddove l’autore aveva inserito citazioni. È infatti consuetudine diffusa lasciare inserite nel testo in corpo normale le citazioni corte; per quanto riguarda invece le citazioni più lunghe è buona riportare il testo in corpo minore, con un margine più ampio, e in modo che sia ben distaccato dal testo che precede la citazione e da quello che la segue. Da questo punto di vista risulta evidente come Peircean Reflections on Psychotic Discourse non sia stato rivisto accuratamente prima di essere dato alle stampe; le citazioni lunghe risultano inserite nel testo senza coerenza: a volte sono riportate in corpo minore e ben distaccate dal resto del testo, altre volte, invece, sono state lasciate inserite nel testo in corpo normale. A tale proposito si veda, per esempio, la citazione dell’opera di Maurice Merleau-Ponty (Phillips 2000:18)

Sempre a proposito delle citazioni riportate, i riferimenti di anno e pagina, che rimandano alla fonte da cui la citazione è tratta, nel testo originale sono inseriti

92

a volte in parentesi tonde e altre volte in parentesi quadre. Anche in questo caso ho optato per una soluzione omogenea, scegliendo la formula: (anno:pagina).
La mancanza di cura dell’aspetto redazionale è palese anche nel caso dei riferimenti bibliografici: spesso sono riportati secondo criteri diversi; a volte, per esempio, il nome dell’autore è trascritto per intero, altre volte viene segnata soltanto l’iniziale. Sono intervenuta quindi non solo inserendo il testo di riferimento italiano, ma anche sulla trascrizione delle fonti originali.

9.1 Le citazioni di Peirce

Nel testo di Phillips sono presenti numerose citazioni di Peirce, spesso non tratte dalla fonte primaria, bensì da altre fonti in cui sono state riportate le parole di Peirce. Ho deciso di inserire in nota a piè di pagina il testo originale e di inserire, come riferimento, il numero del paragrafo da cui sono state tratte le citazioni, in modo da agevolare il lettore che avesse intenzione di approfondire la lettura nei Collected Papers. In fase di traduzione ho però avuto un piccolo intoppo nel momento in cui l’autore ha inserito una citazione di Peirce riportata all’interno di un altro volume (in Phillips 2000:32):

In its genuine form, Third is the triadic relation existing between a sign, its object, and the interpreting thought, itself a sign, considered as constituting the mode of being of a sign. A sign mediates between the interpretant sign and its object.

In realtà, Peirce, nei Collected Papers, non ha usato la parola Third, bensì Thirdness; ho dunque deciso di correggere la citazione e segnalare il mio intervento ricorrendo a una nota a piè di pagina.

93

9.2 Un’ulteriore precisazione

Ho deciso di inserire in nota (per le citazioni di Peirce, Eliot, e Stevenson) il testo inglese di riferimento nonostante in questa tesi sia previsto il testo a fronte. Questa mia decisione è stata dettata dal fatto che il testo a fronte è inserito in questa tesi per fini meramente didattici. In una situazione professionale, in cui viene esclusa l’ipotesi di un testo a fronte, mi sarei comportata in questo modo; alla luce di questa riflessione ho agito di conseguenza.

94

Riferimenti bibliografici

Burness E. Moore, Bernard D. Fine. (a cura di), Dizionario di psicoanalisi, trad. di Bruno Osimo e Lucia Portella, Milano, Sperling & Kupfer, 1993, ISBN 88-200-1549-8.

De Mauro, Tullio (a cura di). Il dizionario della lingua italiana, Milano, Paravia, Bruno Mondadori Editori, 2000, ISBN 88-203-5023-2.

Galimberti, Umberto. (a cura di). Dizionario di psicologia, Torino, UTET, 1994 (1992), ISBN 88-02-04613-4.

Osimo, Bruno. Manuale del traduttore, Milano, Hoepli, 2004, ISBN 88-203- 3269-8.

Osimo, Bruno. Propedeutica della traduzione, Milano, Hoepli, 2005 (2001), ISBN 88-203-2935-2.

Osimo, Bruno. La traduzione saggistica dall’inglese, Milano, Hoepli, 2007, ISBN 88-203-3741-X.

Osimo, Bruno (a cura di). Corso di traduzione [online], [Modena] Logos, 2000- 2004 Disponibile dal world wide web: http://www.logos.it/pls/dictionary/linguistic_resources.traduzione?lang=it [ultima consultazione: 25 maggio 2008].

Peirce, Charles Sanders. The Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, vol. 1-6 a cura di Charles Hartshorne and Paul Weiss, vol. 7-8 a cura di Arthur W. Burks, Cambridge (Massachusetts), Harvard University Press, 1931-1935, 1958.

95

Peirce, Charles Sanders. Scritti di filosofia, a cura di William J. Callaghan, Bologna, Cappelli editore, 1978.

Peirce, Charles Sanders. Scritti scelti, a cura di Giovanni Maddalena, Torino, UTET, 2005, ISBN 88-02-06072-X.

Peirce, Charles Sanders. Opere, a cura di Massimo Bonfantini, Milano, Bompiani, 2003, ISBN 88-452-9216-9.

Phillips, James. Peircean Reflections on Psychotic Discourse, in Peirce, Semiotics, and Psychoanalysis, Baltimore and London, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000, a cura di John Muller e Joseph Brent, ISBN 0-8018-6288-4, p. 16-36.

96

MICHELA IMPERIO I think-aloud protocol come strumento per indagare il processo mentale della traduzione

I think-aloud protocol come strumento per indagare il processo mentale della traduzione

MICHELA IMPERIO

Scuole Civiche di Milano Fondazione di partecipazione Dipartimento Lingue
Scuola Superiore per Mediatori Linguistici via Alex Visconti, 18 20151 MILANO

Relatore: Professor Bruno OSIMO

Diploma in Scienze della Mediazione Linguistica Marzo 2008

© University of Joensuu, Joensuu and Riitta Jääskeläinen 1999 © Michela Imperio 2008

I think-aloud protocol come strumento per indagare il processo mentale della traduzione.

Think-aloud protocols as a method to investigate the mental process of translation.
Michela Imperio

ABSTRACT IN ITALIANO

I processi cognitivi dell’uomo – e in particolare il processo mentale della traduzione – sono stati studiati attraverso diversi metodi di indagine, dall’osservazione di reazioni a stimoli specifici, all’analisi degli errori e dei risultati relativi a un compito svolto. Nel vasto panorama di ricerca in questo campo, think-aloud protocol (TAPs) si distinguono in quanto strumento più adeguato per indagare il complesso processo creativo del tradurre. Essi danno la possibilità di raccogliere dati sui pensieri del traduttore nello stesso momento in cui quest’ultimo li verbalizza, riducendo al minimo il rischio di ottenere informazioni errate o incomplete, dovuto ai limiti della memoria umana. La base teorica su cui poggiano i TAPs sono gli studi sul processo cognitivo umano inteso come processo di elaborazione delle informazioni. Verso la fine degli anni ottanta del novecento, alcuni studiosi pionieri hanno iniziato ad applicare TAPs all’attività traduttiva svolta da studenti di lingue straniere, con fini principalmente pedagogici. La successiva generazione di ricercatori, sulle orme dei primi esperimenti, ha applicato questo metodo con modalità diverse, proponendosi nuovi obbiettivi e avanzando nuove ipotesi (studio delle differenze tra traduttori professionali e non; confronto tra TAPs e joint translation). I TAPs continuano ad avere una grande varietà di applicazione che, se da una parte mette in luce la complessità del processo traduttivo, dall’altra non permette di mettere a confronto gli esperimenti realizzati e di controllare i risultati ottenuti.

ENGLISH ABSTRACT

Human cognitive processes – and particularly the mental process of translation – have been investigated in different ways, e.g. observing reaction to specific stimuli, analyzing the errors and the results of a task performance etc. Think-aloud protocols are the best suited method to investigate the complex and creative process of translating. This method allows to collect data about the translator’s thoughts at the same time he verbalizes them, reducing the risk of getting wrong or incomplete information caused by memory limitations. The theoretical framework for TAP experiments is provided mainly by the studies on human cognition as information processing. In the late 1980s, some pioneer scholars began to apply TAPs to translation tasks carried out by foreign language learners, with pedagogical aims. Following the early experiments, the next generation of researchers applied TAPs in different ways, investigating more specific hypotheses (the study of professional vs. non-professional translator; think-aloud protocol vs. joint translation). The different interests and backgrounds of the researchers involved have resulted in a large variety of independent approaches. TAPs involve different methods of analysis, which, from one hand sheds light on the complexity of the translation process, and from the other makes it difficult to compare different experiments and to test the data collected.

ABSTRACT EN ESPAÑOL

Los procesos cognitivos del hombre – en particular el proceso mental de la traducción –han sido estudiados con distintos métodos de investigación, de la observación de las

1

reacciones a estímulos específicos, al análisis de las faltas y de los resultados relativos a una tarea desarrollada. En el marco de la investigación en este ámbito, los protocolos de pensamiento en voz alta (TAPs) se destacan como el instrumento más adecuado para estudiar el complejo y creativo proceso traslativo. Ellos ofrecen la posibilidad de recoger datos sobre los pensamientos del traductor al mismo tiempo que éste los verbaliza. De esta manera se reduce el riesgo de obtener informaciones erradas o incompletas, debido a los límites de la memoria humana. La base teórica sobre la cual descansan los TAPs son los estudios sobre el proceso cognitivo humano como proceso de elaboración de las informaciones. Hacia la fin de los años ochenta del siglo XIX, algunos estudiosos pioneros empezaron a aplicar los TAPs a la actividad traslativa desempeñada por estudiantes de lenguas extranjeras, con fines pedagógicos. Los investigadores de la generación sucesiva, siguiendo los primeros experimentos, aplicaron este método de distintas maneras, se propusieron nuevos objetivos y propusieron nuevas hipótesis (estudio de las diferencias entre traductores profesionales y no; comparación entre TAPs y actividad en grupos). Hoy, se sigue a aplicar los TAPs en muchas maneras distintas; esto, por un lado saca a luz la complejidad del proceso traslativo, y por el otro, no permite poner en comparación los experimentos desarrollados y averiguar los resultados obtenidos.

2

SOMMARIO

Prefazione 4

  1. Problem solving 6
  2. Methods of data collection 7

    2. 1. Different verbalizing procedures 8 2. 1. 1. Introspection 8 2. 1. 2. Retrospection 8 2. 1. 3. Questions and prompting 10 2. 1. 4. Thinking aloud 10 2. 1. 5. Dialogue protocols 11

  3. Think-aloud protocols – theoretical framework 12 3. 1. The study of the human mind 12 3. 2. Ericsson and Simon’s model 13

    3. 2. 1. Implications of Ericsson and Simon’s model 14 3. 3. Goals 17

  4. TAPs in translation studies 18 4. 1. First studies on foreign language learners 20 4. 2. Further studies: different aims and hypothesis 23
  5. Thinking aloud vs. Joint translation 26 5. 1. Joint-translation’s limits 29
  6. Traduzione con testo a fronte 31
  7. Conclusion 66 Appendice: il testo di riferimento per gli esempi 68 69 70

Ringraziamenti Riferimenti bibliografici

3

PREFAZIONE

Una delle sfide più grandi con cui l’uomo, da sempre, si confronta è quella di capire come agisce la propria mente, quali sono i meccanismi che stanno alla base dei propri ragionamenti. Perché certe situazioni fanno scaturire determinate reazioni comportamentali, perché si fanno o dicono determinate cose, che cosa ci spinge ad affrontare un problema in un modo piuttosto che in un altro, da che cosa dipendono le decisioni che prendiamo? Non sempre, trovandosi di fronte a situazioni problematiche – dalla risoluzione di un’equazione matematica, alla scelta del vestito da mettersi – l’uomo reagisce ponderando tutti i pro e contro del caso in modo conscio; molte reazioni, gesti, parole, nascono da un ragionamento inconscio, che non siamo in grado di spiegare a noi stessi e agli altri, soprattutto se a distanza di tempo.

La soluzione di situazioni problematiche dipende da molti fattori: l’esperienza personale accumulata, la capacità di raccogliere e analizzare le informazioni necessarie dalla propria memoria o dall’ambiente esterno, il fattore emotivo e così via. Lo studio dei processi mediante i quali le informazioni vengono acquisite dal sistema cognitivo, trasformate, elaborate, archiviate e recuperate è affidato alla psicologia cognitiva; essa analizza principalmente processi mentali come la percezione, l’apprendimento, la risoluzione dei problemi, la memoria, l’attenzione, il linguaggio e le emozioni.

La traduzione, fra molte altre, è un’attività complessa, che comporta la risoluzione di tanti piccoli problemi; è un processo di scomposizione, comprensione e analisi del prototesto, di ricerca di strategie traduttive, di nuova sintesi per la creazione del metatesto nella lingua della cultura ricevente: attività che qualsiasi traduttore compie in modo più o meno consapevole, ma che richiedono un grande sforzo di concentrazione, in quanto parte di un’opera creativa. La traduzione, quindi, è frutto di un complicato processo mentale, soggettivo e creativo, di cui è impossibile cogliere tutti i passaggi e le sfumature, senza affidarsi a metodi di studio specifici.

È in tempi relativamente recenti (anni ottanta del novecento) che alcuni studiosi europei, insoddisfatti degli studi fino ad allora realizzati, hanno

4

iniziato a sondare più a fondo le dinamiche del processo mentale del traduttore, affidandosi a metodi di indagine induttivi ed empirici. I think- aloud protocol sono stati, finora, lo strumento più diffuso e adatto a questo tipo di indagine; si tratta, infatti, di una procedura di verbalizzazione che avviene simultaneamente al compito svolto dal traduttore, al quale viene chiesto di riferire ad alta voce ciò che avviene nella sua mente, mentre traduce.

Lo scopo di questo studio è quello di offrire una panoramica dei diversi metodi utilizzati nel corso degli anni per indagare il processo mentale della traduzione e, nello specifico, di presentare – attraverso alcuni studi esemplari realizzati negli ultimi trent’anni – la grande varietà di applicazione dei think- aloud protocol, varietà che, se da una parte apre orizzonti verso nuovi oggetti di studio e nuovi metodi di indagine, dall’altra non permette di mettere a confronto le ricerche condotte e di controllare i risultati ottenuti.

5

1. PROBLEM SOLVING

Problem solving is the process of finding solutions to complex problems for which the answer is not necessarily evident. It can be described as a goal- directed cognitive process that requires effort and concentration. This can be caused by the fact that we can’t retrieve the answer directly from memory, but we must construct it from the information available in memory or information obtained from the environment (for example, the givens of a problem or extra information that can be requested). In other cases, “finding the answer involves exploring many possible answers none of which is immediately recognized as the solution to the problem” (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994: 8). Therefore, we don’t find the solution directly in a single step but via intermediate reasoning steps, some of which may later appear useless or false.

A person’s ability to solve problems relies on his innate ability to mentally organize stimuli into relevant and useful schemas that can be used to deduce a solution from a limited stock of information. People frequently have to deal with problem-solving activities, professionally as well as privately. Some of these problems are well defined, for example algebraic equations, questions in a school chemistry test, medical diagnosis problems in a standard setting; in other cases, the problem itself and its potential solution are not so well defined and it is not so easy to evaluate the solution in terms of correctness. Examples of these activities are: designing websites, buying a new house, selecting a new bass player for a band, translating a text. Such activities require the solution of many smaller problems.

In everyday life one has to solve a lot of problems. What cloths shall we put on today, what is the most efficient route to the university, how much does a kilo of apples cost given the price of a pound, how to discuss troubles with one’s friend etc. Sometimes we are well aware of the fact that we are trying to solve a problem, for instance when we are trying to calculate how much something costs in a foreign currency: we consciously try to remember the exchange rate, in order to perform the mathematical operations required. But at times problem solving goes on without noticing, i.e. we may not perceive our mental process as problem solving.

6

There can be different reasons to study problem-solving processes. For example, a psychologist may want to investigate what mechanisms underlie human reasoning, what causes errors, the character and origin of people’s different performances. An educational scientist may be interested in the effect of education or in children’s difficulties in solving exercise problems. A knowledge engineer may want to analyze how a subject carries out a task, in order to try to build a computer system that can do the same. The aim the researcher may have partly determines the nature of the procedure he follows when using protocol analysis for collecting data about the cognitive process (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

2. METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION

One class of methods of data collection on the problem-solving process is based on observation of problem-solving behavior. The first one, product analysis, uses the results of problem solving: the solution to a problem may reveal aspects of the problem-solving behavior. It is possible to obtain further information by observing the problem-solving behavior concurrently while it takes place.

Besides simple observation of results and behavior during problem solving, properties that are not directly visible or audible may be examined by using special equipment: researchers may register eye movements during problem solving or even measure activity in various parts of the brain by special techniques, which may provide data on what information is being focused on and processed at a certain moment.

Behavioral observations are registered as action protocols. One of the few techniques that give access to data about the problem-solving process is storing a behavior trace if a person manipulates objects during problem solving (for example when using a computer).

Another class of techniques used both in psychology and in knowledge acquisition, is based on predefined forms in which the subject should express his knowledge. According to the task and the purpose of the research, it is possible to use an infinite variety of formats. One of them are questions with

7

predefined answers from which one or more is selected (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

A final class of methods involves unstructured verbal reports of problem solving, which can be obtained in different ways.

2. 1. DIFFERENT VERBALIZING PROCEDURES

“It is assumed that those mental activities which are dealt with in working memory (i.e. which are to some degree conscious) can be verbalized” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 62).

According to Ericsson and Simon (1984) a distinction should be made between various kinds of verbal report procedures (or introspective methods), and particularly between classical introspective reports, retrospective responses to specific probes and think-aloud protocols. This distinction is crucial in determining the reliability and the validity of these methods of data collection (Jääskeläinen 1999).

2. 1. 1. INTROSPECTION

Classic introspection consists in instructing the subject to report his thoughts at intermediate points of the problem-solving task, which are chosen by him. As used by psychologists in the 1920s and 1930s, researchers also ask the subject to give an accurate, complete and coherent report on his cognitive processes. As a result, introspective reports involve the use of psychological terminology and interpretation by the subject; for this reason, they are also more subject to memory errors and misinterpretations than other methods (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

The problem involved is that “the informant is also expected to act as the analyst/researcher. Consequently, both the data and the analysis are subjective” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 63); there is no objectivity in the sense of the object of research being independent of the researcher.

2. 1. 2. RETROSPECTION

In retrospective responses to specific probes subjects are invited to perform a task and afterwards they are asked questions about their behavior

8

during the performance. The problem-solving session can also be recorded on video; this way, the experimenter can then review the video-tape together with the subject, who can give his interpretation of what happened” (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

“The informant is therefore no longer the analyst, which makes the analysis more objective and the findings open to falsification” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 66).

However, there seem to be some problems. In fact, a person could find it difficult to remember exactly what he did, especially if some time has passed after the task has been carried out. Sometimes even, one is not aware of what he is doing. Furthermore, subjects may tend to report their thought process as more coherent and intelligent than it originally was, giving the false impression of perfectly rational behavior (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

This kind of post hoc rationalizing can be intentional or unintentional. In fact, humans tend to reconstruct events as more structured than they originally were, because their memory is guided by their knowledge of the result.

Some researchers have shown that the data obtained by retrospection are not always valid (Nisbett and Wilson, 1979; Ericsson and Simon, 1993). They examined closely the conditions under which reports are considered unreliable and they discovered that

all discrepancies were found in situations in which there was either a delay in time between the cognitive process and the report, or there was a question by the experimenter that required an interpretation rather than a direct report, (‘Why did you do X instead of Y?’), or both. (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994: 22)

When subjects are asked for memories, explanations or motivations, they don’t answer from direct memory of the cognitive process but from an interpretation of it that can be influenced by expectations.

9

The memory model can explain why. Retrospection means that people must retrieve information from long-term memory and then verbalize it. The inconvenience is that the retrieval process may not reproduce all the information that was actually present in working memory during the problem- solving activity.

Furthermore, it is also possible that people retrieve information that was not actually in working memory as if it was. “After solving the problem, the solution will help to remember the steps that actually led to it” and to reconstruct them easily. “However, odd and fruitless steps that occurred on the way are less likely to be retrieved” (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994: 22).

2. 1. 3. QUESTIONS AND PROMPTING

Another verbalizing procedure implies actually interrupting the problem- solving process: subjects are asked questions during the activity or are prompted at given intervals to tell what they are thinking or doing. Therefore, they don’t have the chance to smooth over the answer as in retrospection. The drawback of this method is that it interrupts the problem-solving process and subjects may have difficulty in taking up the thread. Moreover, prompts that require interpretation may affect the problem-solving process (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

2. 1. 4. THINKING ALOUD

The thinking aloud method differs from classical introspection and retrospection in that it is undirected and concurrent. The verbalizations are produced simultaneously with the task performance, but the subject is not as a rule required to verbalize specific information. “Due to memory limitations concurrent and undirected reporting is likely to capture more of the process (less is forgotten) more reliably (less is distorted)” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 66).

According to Ericsson & Simon (1993), thinking aloud does not interfere with the task performance and the thought process. The subject solves a problem while the talking is executed almost automatically; in fact, almost all

10

of his conscious effort is aimed at solving the problem, and there is no room left for reflecting on what he is doing. For this reason, there is no delay and the data gathered are direct; the subject does not interpret his thoughts nor is he required to bring them into a predefined form, but he renders them just as they come to mind. However, think aloud protocols are not necessarily complete because a subject may verbalize only part of his thoughts (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

With tasks in which thinking aloud is not possible (e.g. simultaneous interpreting), data can be collected through retrospective verbal reports.

“They ought to be elicited immediately after the task performance (immediate retrospection) and with as little interference from the experimenter as possible” (Ericsson and Simon 1984: 19).

2. 1. 5. DIALOGUE PROTOCOLS

Although monologue protocols are still predominantly the main tool for collecting data, the artificiality that still remains has led some researchers (House 1988; Hönig 1990 and 1991; Kussmaul 1989a, 1989b, 1993 and 1994; Schmid 1994) to get subjects to talk to each other. In a small-scale experiment, House compared monologue and dialogue protocols applied to translation tasks. The findings show that in monologue protocols processes as selecting target language items, weighing alternatives and choosing a particular translation equivalent remained unverbalized (House 1988). In contrast, when people collaborate they will sometimes have differing opinions. Thus they are forced to give arguments, to clarify steps of their thinking processes. In fact, when talking in pairs, subjects negotiated solutions to translation problems and each individual’s thoughts appeared to have been consistently shaped due to the necessity of having to verbalize them. House concluded that the dialogue situation provided richer data than monologue protocols (House 1988). “Later TAP experiments have shown, however, that the richness of data depends on the type of subjects and the translation brief, and, above all, on the priorities of the researcher” (Kussmaul and Tirkkonen-Condit: 180).

11

3. THINK-ALOUD PROTOCOLS – THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK

Over the last three decades, think-aloud protocols have become a widely- used method in the study of cognitive processes as problem solving, reading and writing and human-computer interactions.

As I mentioned before, the method of thinking aloud consists in organizing an experiment in which subjects are asked to carry out a task and to verbalize their thoughts while performing. The task performance is recorded on audio- or, preferably, on video-tape. The resulting recordings are then transcribed (think-aloud protocols, or TAPs) and subjected to analysis.

It is important to note, however, that “thinking aloud” as a method of eliciting data is not the same as “thinking aloud” in the everyday sense; it entails more than sitting people down next to tape-recorder and asking them to talk (Jääskeläinen 1999: 9).

3.1. THE STUDY OF THE HUMAN MIND

The think-aloud method has its roots in psychological research.

One of the hardest problems in research dealing with mental process is that the workings of the human mind cannot be observed directly the way some other objects of scientific endeavors can be. Instead, indirect means are necessary, which creates obvious problems for research (Jääskeläinen 1999: 53).

One of the first approaches to the study of the mind (in the late 19th century) was to train people to introspect upon their own thought process. Classical introspection is based on the idea that events that take place in consciousness can be observed, more or less the same way events in the outside world can be. It is a problematic research method, mainly because the events that take place in consciousness, which are to be analyzed and explained, are accessible only to a single observer, who also performs the thought process. The source of data also provides the analysis of the data; therefore the analysis is totally subjective and it is impossible to replicate empirical studies and thereby to settle scientific discussions about thought

12

processes. Due to the built-in limitation of the introspective method, psychologists turn away from it and from all associated theories. But introspection was a central method in studying cognitive processes and consequently psychological research turned away from cognitive processes too (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

Understandable counter-reactions followed. One of them was the behaviorist paradigm (1930s) which promoted psychology as a hard positivist science. Its purpose was to limit psychological research to objectively observable behavior. This entailed abandoning subjective research methods like introspection, because “the objective, i.e. scientific, study of the human behavior could only be based on the analysis of the relationship between external stimuli and behavioral responses” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 55).

Behaviorism dominated American psychology, while European researchers, particularly representatives of the Gestalt Psychology school of thought, had a slightly different view of how to do psychology. Although they also rejected classical introspection as a research method, they wanted to study thought and not just behavioral responses to stimuli. They also developed more sophisticated methods of data collection on the thought process: phenomenological observation, phenomenological introspection, and the method of thinking aloud (Börsch 1986). The beginnings of the cognitive paradigm are usually dated in the mid 1950s and picked up where Gestalt Psychology left off (due to the beginning of the Second World War) (Jääskeläinen 1999).

3. 2. ERICSSON AND SIMON’S MODEL

Thinking aloud as a method for scientific research rests on a solid scientific foundation in cognitive psychology, a science that studies human cognition, i.e. how humans receive, store, manipulate, and use knowledge.

The theoretical framework for TAP experiments is provided mainly by the work of Ericsson and Simon (1984). These scholars base their theory of verbalization on the information-processing approach in cognitive psychology,

13

i.e. they assume that human cognition is information processing. According to Ericsson and Simon’s model, humans keep information in different memory stores, characterized by different access and storage capabilities: short-term memory (STM) present easy access but severely limited storage space, whereas long-term memory (LTM) is characterized by more difficult access and larger storage space (Bernardini 1999).

Information input will first be heeded by the STM and when its capacity and storage time is exhausted, the information is transferred to the LTM. A certain loss both prior and during this transfer is assumed, but it does not seem to be a substantial loss (M. A. Schmidt 2005: 27).

Only information present in STM, that is information which is currently being processed, can be directly accessed and reported; LTM contains information which has left consciousness, but which can later be retrieved back to STM for further processing.

The STM is also called working memory (WM); it is the primary site of the procedural memory. LTM, by contrast, serves as the vessel for the declarative memory (M. A. Schmidt 2005). As far as the translation process is concerned, it is important to consider the function and capacity of the STM because translating relies as much on procedural knowledge as on declarative knowledge. “This distinction is crucial because the cognitive processes, as well as information that is not currently being processed, cannot be reported but must be inferred by the analyst on the basis of the verbalizations” (Bernardini 1999: 2).

The implications of Ericsson and Simon’s model are manifold.

3. 2. 1. IMPLICATIONS OF ERICSSON AND SIMON’S MODEL

First of all, according to Ericsson and Simon’s model, only concurrent verbalization of thoughts exhaustively reflect the mental states of a subject carrying out a relatively long task, which takes longer than ten seconds to complete, according to Ericsson and Simon (Bernardini 1999). It is important to notice that a cognitive process takes longer when the subject thinks aloud.

14

“This means that people are able to slow down the normal process to synchronize it with verbalization” (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994: 33). When the subject has completed the task, part of the information moves

on to LTM, leaving behind retrieval cues in STM: in such cases, it has been found that post hoc verbalization is difficult and often incomplete (Ericsson and Simon, 1993). Moreover, under these circumstances, it can be extremely problematic to exclude the possibility that a subject is interpreting his own thought processes or even generating them anew, instead of retrieving them from LTM.

Secondly, to make sure that the subject actually reports his mental states without distorting them, it is important that he does not feel he is taking part in a social interaction: although conversation is obviously a natural situation, it involves reworking thoughts to conform them to socially established norms; this process might sensibly alter the information attended to (Bernardini 1999). Emotional and motivational factors can produce a cognitive process different from the process that would take place without thinking aloud. “There is not much evidence that thinking aloud adds much to the effect of being studied and evaluated that is inevitable in knowledge acquisition and experimental settings” (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994: 33). The interaction between subject and experimenter (or between subjects) should therefore be avoided or at least reduced to a minimum. There is one other cause for concern: if the subject keeps silent for a long time, the verbalization will become useless, because significant parts of the cognitive process in STM may not be tracked down. To avoid this, the experimenter is allowed to repeat to the subject to think aloud with a short and non-intrusive reminder; Ericsson and Simon propose to use the phrase “keep talking” (Krahmer and Ummelen 2004).

Thirdly, “practice and experience may affect the amount of processing carried out in STM, so that fewer mental states will be available for verbalization to subjects experienced in a task” (Bernardini 1999: 2). This process, known as ‘automation’ refers to the fact that “as particular processes

15

become highly practiced, they become more and more fully automated” (Ericsson and Simon 1984:15) and do not require active processing in working memory, i.e. they are executed at an unconscious level and become less accessible for verbalization. “To give a simple example, a novice driver has to focus all of his attention to driving; after most of the process involved in driving has become automatized, it is possible to engage in a conversation while driving” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 59). These kinds of processes are faster and more efficient than those under conscious control, but they are also less flexible and more difficult to modify at need. However, it is possible to bring at least some automatized processes back to conscious attention; otherwise teaching would be virtually impossible.

There exist several other obstacles on access to process, for example, a heavy cognitive load during a task performance. Due to STM’s storage limitations, subjects tend to stop verbalizing if they have to pay attention to too many things at the same time. “In some cases, processing uses all the available capacity and none is left for producing verbalizations” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 59).

For example, if reasoning takes place in verbal form, verbalizing the working memory’s contents is easy and doesn’t use memory capacity. However, if the information is non-verbal and complicated, verbalization will take time and space in working memory because it becomes a cognitive process itself. Consequently, the report of the original process will be incomplete and the process itself can even be disrupted (Someren, Barnard and Sandberg 1994).

Finally, Ericsson and Simon take into account the effects of personality and personal history over the data collected through TAPs. Individual differences in knowledge and ability to verbalize thoughts can heavily bias the data collected through TAPs. The problem here is the object of study and not the methodology used: individual differences exist, and research should not conceal them. However, it seems advisable to try to limit the effects of

16

individual differences and to take them into account when analyzing the data, in order to obtain more reliable and generalizable data (Bernardini 1999).

All these limitations imply that verbalizations represent but a minute fraction of the total amount of mental activities occurring at any moment in time. However, this does not mean that this fraction would be somehow unimportant or uninteresting for research. Moreover, the fragmentary verbal reports can be completed with other kinds of data, such as questionnaires, process-product comparisons, eye-movements, pauses, etc. (Jääskeläinen 1999).

Thinking aloud is unnatural. Therefore, Ericsson and Simon recommend an initial warm-up session in which subjects are taught to verbalize their thoughts. During this practicing phase, the experimenter should feel free to disrupt the task and talk to the subject, whereas during the experiment he should be very concerned not to interfere. During warming-up

subjects should learn the difference between describing what they are doing (“I now move a disk from here to there”) and thinking aloud (“since this disk is smaller than that one, I put it on another pin first” (Krahmer and Ummelen 2004: 3).

They are also instructed to avoid making analytic comments about their tasks. Verbalizations are non-limited: the participants are instructed to say

aloud what comes into their minds without any restrictions.

3. 3. GOALS

Think-aloud protocols have been used for three types of goals:
1. To find evidence for models and theories of cognitive processes: Newell & Simon for instance, used TAPs for collecting data to develop and support a theory of human problem solving. Many other researchers have been working at the development of models of the cognitive processes involved in writing. One of the most known is Flower and Hayes’ model, presented in 1981. It was

17

the starting point for a discussion about the use of the think-aloud method in writing research.
2. “To discover and understand general patterns of behavior in the interaction with documents or applications, in order to create a scientific basis for designing them” (Krahmer and Ummelen 2004: 1). Carroll, for example, used TAPs to investigate how learners interacted with new software. It has been found that they were annoyed by the huge quantity of irrelevant information contained in tutorial manuals. In fact, manuals appeared not to satisfy the users’ goals and questions. TAPs analyses also showed how software users learn to work with a new system; consequently, researchers were able to develop a new design for software manuals: the minimal manual.

3. To test and revise functional documents and applications such as manuals and websites. Researchers like Schriver and Nielsen used verbal protocols (usability testing, pre-testing, formative testing) to gather users’ information to support the design of a specific product (Krahmer and Ummelen 2004).

4. TAPs IN TRANSLATION STUDIES

The analysis of think-aloud protocols (TAPs) in translation studies began in Europe in the late 1980s. Scholars felt the necessity to develop empirical and inductive methods in order to complement the predominantly deductive and often also normative models of the translation process presented until then, which usually described what ideally happened or rather – with a pedagogical aim – what should happen, in translating. It was researchers like Krings, Königs and Lörscher in Germany, Dechert and Sandrock in Britain, Jääskeläinen and Tirkkonen-Condit in Finland, who began to ask what actually happens when people translate (Kussmaul and Tirkkonen-Condit).

This new trend can be partly explained by developments in the adjacent disciplines: psychology had renewed its interest in the study of the mental process (as opposed to patterns of external behavior) with the consequent choice of appropriate or legitimate methods of research. This change had an

18

impact on psycholinguistic research, including research on second language learning, and, via L2 research, on translation studies (Jääskeläinen 1999).

“There has always been a kind of empirical research, like translation criticism and error analysis, but this was product- and not process-oriented” (Kussmaul and Tirkkonen-Condit: 177). In fact, when comparing the target text with the source text or when looking at errors, one could at best speculate in retrospect about what had occurred in the translator’s mind during translation. What was needed was a way to discover what actually happens, “to get a glimpse into the ‘black box’, as it were” (Kussmaul and Tirkkonen- Condit: 178).

In this sense, viewing translation mainly as a problem-solving activity, some scholars proposed that it should be possible to study it by means of TAPs, and set up experiments to test this hypothesis. The different interests and backgrounds of the researchers involved have resulted in a large variety of independent approaches (Bernardini 1999).

This kind of analyses increases our potential for describing and explaining the translation processes, and thus our theoretical understanding; moreover, they have at least two pedagogical purposes. (1) The different strategies observed in the TAPs may serve as models for successful translating (Lörscher 1992a; Jääskeläinen 1993; Krings 1988; Kussmaul 1993). (2) If translation students are used as subjects, TAPs may be used to find out where they have problems. The data collected can then form a basis for translation pedagogy (Krings, 1988; Kussmaul, 1989a+b, 1994). It might be argued that teachers of translation, from years of experience, already know which strategies to recommend to learners. But sometimes they draw the wrong conclusions from their students’ translations. Teachers may, for instance, have the impression that students have problems with text-comprehension while, when talking to them, they find that students actually have problems expressing what they had understood. TAPs can help teachers to see matters more clearly (Kussmaul and Tirkkonen-Condit).

19

In fact, one of the first areas to apply verbal reports procedures to the study of language use was research on foreign language (FL) learning; other areas were research on writing processes and on FL reading processes. Some of the researches on L2 learning/acquisition have used translation tasks to elicit data on students’ text processing strategies (Gerloff 1986) or on the organization of cognitive planning in a translation task. Consequently, these studies may offer interesting insights and hypothesis for translation-oriented research.

The empirical investigation of the translation process, (data are collected asking subjects to think aloud during a translation task) vary in terms of subject population (language learners, translation students, professional translators), translation task (oral or written translation), text-types (news articles, advertisements, editorials, etc.); source and target languages, access to reference material, translation briefs, limited or unlimited time, etc. In addition, and more importantly, TAP studies offer a lot of definitions of translating, research interest and objectives, and methods of analysis. “Failure to recognize the variety of approaches taken by TAP researchers can lead to misleading over-generalizations (or even discarding all such studies as ‘uninteresting’ for translation studies)” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 39).

It is important to know what are the general aims and frames of reference and the experimental details of different TAP studies, in order to assess their findings and relate them to other kinds of research. The first essential distinction is to see whether the emphasis of a research is on translation studies or psycholinguistics. This means, whether the aim is to understand the nature of translating or whether translation is used as an experimental task to collect data on the nature of language processing (Jääskeläinen 1999).

4. 1. FIRST STUDIES ON FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNERS

The very first studies by Sandrock (1982) and Krings (1986) already show the advantages and the limitations of this method of elicitation and set the

20

standards for the design of similar studies. Kings’ extensive study of the translation process of eight advanced students of French demonstrates the immense wealth and richness of data that can be obtained by TAP as well as the necessity to choose among all the possible variables for both the aim and the analysis.

From the point of view of Translation Studies though, the research has a drawback: the participants were not involved in translation as a professional or even potentially professional activity; they were foreign language students and teachers-in-training and translated their tasks the same way they would have translated an ordinary assignment in a language class. In fact, the translation brief specified they should translate in their usual manner.

Thus, the objective of Kings’ study was translating in a pedagogical context or didactic translation, which is a rather different task than translation as a professional activity. Nevertheless, the study provided a number of research questions and categories to apply to analysis as well as a highly fruitful way to use TAP in the study of the translation process (Schmidt 2005: 22).

Gerloff published her study in 1988. She investigated and compared the translation process of three different subject populations: four college students of French, four bilingual speakers English/French without any experience of translation, and four professional translators, normally translating from French into English. The study focused on translation in one direction i.e. from L2 (French) to L1 (English). Gerloff used essentially the same coding and classifying categories as Krings. The most important finding is that more experienced translators (experience here is defined in the context of translating being an innate ability in bilinguals), such as both the professionals and the bilinguals in her sample, do not necessarily translate more easily or faster than the less experienced translators (here defined as the foreign language students). From that, along with other indicators, she concluded that experienced translators are more aware of the difficulty of the problems they find and of their possible solutions; furthermore, they set higher

21

standards for their performance than novices. From this comes the quality of their translations and of their text production.

According to Krings and Gerloff, the results of their experiments are determined by a difference in strategy. Inexperienced translators, in fact, employ more local strategies, i.e. they are concerned only with the fragment they are working on, without considering the text as a whole. Moreover, they don’t relate to their own world-knowledge. More experienced translators, in contrast, use more global strategies, that relate the problem to their world- knowledge, to the text as a whole and to its overall theme.

The two studies also shared other important results: the subjects mostly rendered small syntactic units, working their way through the task in a linear way, i.e. “translation is done proceeding from item A to item B in a text without looking forward or backward further than to the next sentence boundary” (Schmidt 2005: 23).

Lörscher (1991) investigated the translation process in foreign language learners using as subjects of his experiment first- or second-year students of English at the university he was working at (they were not even advanced learners). He assumed that oral translation would provide richer material then written translation. Therefore, he instructed his participants to translate a written text orally and recorded their spoken translations, including all concurrent verbalization. With this research, Lörscher claims to investigate the translation process itself, even if he recognizes that his model does not resemble a “real mediating situation”, as he calls it because:

[...] it is still unknown whether translation processes in real mediating situations are different – in detail or in principle – from translation processes in artificial mediating situations (Lörscher 1991: 4).

Despite the discrepancies between the design and the aim of his study, Lörscher developed a refined model for analyzing TAP, providing a useful tool for further research.

22

In all of these experiments, the subjects were foreign language learners, rather than students of translation, which has received a fair amount of criticism, because their findings can hardly account for professional translators’ performance. However, they have laid the methodological basis for subsequent TAP studies and have provided important information about translating by foreign language learners, which can be used for comparisons between non-professional, semi-professional (translation students) and professional translation, a design feature that can be seen in the studies by Königs 1987, Kussmaul 1998 and Jonasson 1998 (Jääskeläinen 1999).

4. 2. FURTHER STUDIES: DIFFERENT AIMS AND HYPOTHESIS

Following these pioneers, a number of other translation researchers have since used TAP to elicit data for their studies. These studies have different settings and involve different subject populations (translation students, professional translators, teacher of translation, laypersons, bilingual, a combination of these categories); different language pairs (depending partly on where the research has been carried out); different types of task and experimental conditions (translating a written text orally, producing a written translation, translating alone, in pairs or in small groups; translating with o without access to reference material, limited or unlimited available time); different text-types (political satire, newspaper editorials, tourist brochures, government documents) and translation briefs (faithful translation, cultural adaptation, shortening or popularizing the ST, rewriting procedures); different categories of analysis (identification of translation problems and problem- solving strategies, focus on conscious attention, role of affective factors on translation).

“TAP studies on translating could also be conceptualized in terms of their general purposes and the specificity of their hypothesis” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 44). On this basis, they could be divided into first- and second-generation studies; the first group would include those with a relatively general aim of discovering what happens in translation (Krings and Lörscher) or what

23

distinguishes between professional vs. non-professional translation (Jääskeläinen, Tirkkonen-Condit). The second group, in turn, focus on investigating more specific hypotheses, often derived from the findings of the first-generation studies. TAP research carried out at the Savolinna School of Translation Studies makes part of this second kind of studies.

The purpose of the first TAP experiments at Savolinna was to identify differences between professional vs. non-professional translation (Jääskeläinen and Tirkkonen-Condit). The designation of ‘professional’ and ‘non-professional’ referred, misleadingly, to fifth-year and first-year students of translation respectively. However, it has been frequently pointed out that the differences between first-year and fifth-year students’ translation processes may not depend on different levels of translation competence alone, but on other factors, such as differences in their world knowledge (in its quantity, because the quality of world knowledge is naturally different in every single individual). As a consequence, Pöntinen and Romanov (1989) organized a TAP experiment with two subjects: the first one was a teacher of translation and free-lance translator; the second one was a subject specialist. They were about the same age with a high level of education. The data collected showed some interesting differences between the two subjects’ decision criteria: the translator relied more on textual knowledge than the subject specialist (Jääskeläinen 1999).

A further generation of researchers on the translation process turned their interest to even more specific aspects, e.g. the semantic change and the reading and comprehension process involved in translation (Dancette 1994).

Several of the most recent TAP studies on the translation process, are aimed to explore the difference between categories of translators such as professionals, advanced students in translation training programs and language students with respect to their translational behavior (Englund Dimitrova 2005, Norberg 2003). Some of them wanted to discover what kind of linguistic and extra linguistic factors influence the production of “good”

24

translations. Jensen (2000) and Jääskeläinen looked at the influence of routine vs. non-routine tasks on task performance and investigate the differences between professionals and laymen. Künzli (2003) explored the impact of emotional and affective states on subjects’ performance.

Some researchers in Denmark proposed including methods of logging the writing process during translation to develop and corroborate data collected by means of TAP. Their studies point towards a possible design combining different analyzing methods that could be able to elicit and evaluate data telling us more about the complex structures that govern the translation process (Schmidt 2005).

The list of TAP studies presented above shows that it exists a heterogeneous group of investigations. In fact, the first process-oriented research projects started in isolation, independently of each other; therefore they reflect very different translation theoretical frameworks ad research aims.

Furthermore, in the absence of previous research, methods of analysis have been developed to describe a particular body of data. As a result, applying the methods of analysis to other kinds of data has, as a rule, resulted in modifications or in the introduction of new methods of analysis (Jääskeläinen 1999: 46).

On the whole, the presence of different researches has the advantage to shed light on different aspects of different kinds of translation processes. This increases our understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying translation. “Indeed the great variety of TAP approaches has highlighted the fact that ‘the’ translation process does not exist; instead, there are many different translation processes which are the outcome of many kinds of factors. However, the differences in the kinds of data collected, analyses carried out, and the overall goals of research have made it more difficult to test the methods employed in previous experiments.

25

Moreover, due to the difficult and time-consuming methods of data collection and analysis involved in TAP research, the numbers of subjects have remained relatively small (ranging from one to 48) and investigators have been extremely careful in generalizing on the basis of the data collected, even if it would be very important to be able to test research findings and conclusions with those of other studies, particularly at the early stages of process-oriented research (Jääskeläinen 1999).

5. THINKING ALOUD VS. JOINT TRANSLATION

Due to the limitations involved in the use of TAPs, it has been suggested that a better and more natural way to investigate the translation process would be to ask subjects to translate in small groups (“joint translation”, Matrat 1992).

House’s, Matrat’s and Séguinot’s experiments provide data to discuss on the validity of this method.

House asked to German university students of English (not translation students) to translate a text from English into German. One group translated in pairs and another alone, while thinking aloud. The students in the think- aloud session were not trained to spontaneous think aloud with the help of a warm-up task, and this makes it difficult to compare the two bodies of data.

House’s findings show that the students translating in pairs were using more sophisticated strategies. For example, while students in the think-aloud session focused exclusively on lexicon-semantic problems in a text which was chosen for its syntactic difficulty, the student-pairs frequently dealt with grammatical problems.

House concludes that “the introspective data produced by pairs is less artificial, richer in translation strategies and simply much more interesting” (House 1988:95).

But, until a systematic methodological survey is carried out, it can also be speculated that translating in pairs may help externalize knowledge which is poorly employed or access when students are translating alone.

26

Matrat (1992) carried out a systematic comparison of three categories of subjects (novice, advanced and expert translators) performing translation tasks in a think-aloud vs. joint activity translating experiment.

Matrat’s approach is embedded in Vygotsky’s psychological theory that proposes consciousness as “the highest level of organization of mental functions comprising both intellect and affect”, and thus as “the fundamental object of psychological research” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 75).

Vygotsky rejected introspective methods and reducing psychology to the studying of isolated components of mind; he argued that interdisciplinary research could account for the interrelationship between cultural, linguistic and psychological phenomena (Matrat 1992). According to him, consciousness is socially constructed and consequently he proposed that observing joint activity would be the appropriate method (genetic method) to investigate human cognitive processes. He also proposed to introduce obstacles and difficulties into the experimental task in order to disrupt routine methods of problem-solving and, thus to discover new skills.

In Matrat’s experiment, the three groups of students produced a written translation of a written source text from English into Italian (their native language). The same subjects took part in two experiments: first a think-aloud experiment and then a joint translating activity. The source texts were different for the two activities, but to retain the same level of difficulty they were different paragraphs of the same text. The use of dictionary was not allowed and the time was limited. There appears to have been no articulated translation brief. The experimental sessions were video-taped.

The setting of Matrat’s experiments shows that more variables may have contributed to her findings (choice to use text excerpts from the same text, limited time, no access to reference books). Moreover, a problem arises: when the subjects started the joint activity, they were already familiar with the source text.

Matrat compares the collected data in terms of (1) problem definition and structure and (2) strategic processing. The findings indicate that in joint

27

translating, students identified problems more clearly and recognized they have a complex structure. Furthermore, evidence of strategic processing was more easily identifiable than in think-aloud protocols.

As far as TAPs are concerned, advanced students were the best subjects, as their training had provided them with the metalanguage to discuss translation problems. This observation shows Matrat expects the subjects to provide sophisticated analyses, i.e. to introspect rather than to think aloud, which, in turn, reflects her interest in the emergence of metacognition.

“One of the most puzzling findings is that none of the protocols showed evidence of decision-making strategies or decision criteria, whereas other TAP studies contain plenty of verbalizations on decision-making” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 78). In fact, the subjects discussed problems, but were not able to decide on a solution, then moved on and never came back to the problem (Matrat 1992). This may have been the result of time constraint or of the fact that the text was incomplete.

In addition, the subjects’ interpretation of the purpose of the experiment may also have played a role: in one example of joint translation, one of the subjects said that the experimenters were interested in what subjects said and not in how they translated. This comment is important in relation to the methodological comparison: if the subjects felt that their ability to talk about translating was being investigated, they might have been intimidated by the demands of the task when translating alone, while it seems reasonable to assume that tackling the task together (and with some previous experience with the text) would be less face-threatening to the subjects.

In sum, it seems that Matrat’s investigation in not only trying to compare the appropriateness of the two methods of data collection, but also to argue for the appropriateness of Vygotsky’s theory on human consciousness in relation with translation. This complicates the assessment of the validity of her methodological comparison.

28

5. 1. JOINT-TRANSLATION’S LIMITS

Someone could argue that “making people translate together is as artificial as asking them to think aloud while translating, since most translators usually work alone” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 80). For this reason, Séguinot studied the translation processes of two professional translators who were used to work together. Findings show that dialogue protocols illuminate the ‘non-rational’ element in translation: during the translation process, the translators’ discussion shifted to areas which had nothing to do with the task at hand (Séguinot 1996). The findings also “indicate that translation is non- linear and iterative, i.e. the mind keeps looking for alternatives even after a translation problem has been solved” (Jääskeläinen 1999: 80). Furthermore, there is evidence of parallel processing during translating.

Data from joint activity may be richer, more natural and even more interesting than think-aloud reports, but they do not provide access to the solitary translation process. The object of the research is different in the two experimental conditions. Moreover, it seems that joint activity elicits more sophisticated strategies form the subjects. This can be due to the re-activation of automatized processes in the case of professional translators or externalizing unused strategies in the case of translation students or, as House or Matrat argue, that joint activity is better able to capture the underlying mental processes than thinking-aloud. However, on the bases of these studies, the latter conclusion seems premature.

Another problem with joint activities is that they may distort the results. One of the subjects may assume a leading role, because of his personality. Thus, other subjects may accept solutions not because they are better but because they are proposed by the more dynamic person. In other cases, subjects may hold back their ideas for reasons of politeness, or even chivalry. When analyzing the dialogue protocols the researcher should therefore take care to observe only those processes where subjects take an equal part in solution-finding. One way of minimizing this kind of problems would be to choose “matching” subjects, with no psychological or social superiority of one over the other and where personalities are quite similar (Kussmaul, 1995).

29

However, one should be aware of the fact that variables cannot be completely controlled (Kussmaul and Tirkkonen-Condit).

30

6. TRADUZIONE CON TESTO A FRONTE

The following section talks about the importance of taking into account subjects’ social-psychological factors, when carrying out a TAP experiment and analyzing the data collected. Variables such as subject’s personal history and emotional factors can result in unexpected behavior by the subjects and alter the results of the experiment.

The whole section is a text taken from Tapping the process: an explorative study of the cognitive and affective factors involved in translating (Jääskeläinen 1999: 137-151), which I have also translated into Italian.

31

SUBJECTS’ BACKGROUND AND SOCIAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS

As has been mentioned in the previous sections the unexpected features of the subjects’ behaviour in the experimental task may be explained by their personal histories. In addition, social-psychological factors, such as Goffman’s (1961) notion of role distancing, may also provide explanations. I will begin with a discussion of the subjects’ personal histories as an explaining factor and then move on to describing the types of behaviour which I see as potential displays of role distancing in the present data.

The first example of a subject’s personal history as an explanation deals with one of the non-professional translators, Laura. As was mentioned in section 4. 1., Laura had written her doctoral dissertation in English. In her professional career she had also reported on her research both in English and in Finnish, i.e. she had considerable experience in reporting her own thoughts in two languages. Nida argues (1964: 242) that ‘if a person is to serve as a translator, – he must have had a good deal of experience in language shifting’. Although Laura had had no experience in translating, which she explicitly pointed out in the background questionnaire, she had accumulated a great deal of experience in language shifting. As a consequence, Laura also seemed to have moved away from the ‘school translation’ approach to translating and was able to produce a relatively fluent and idiomatic Finnish text. Furthermore, Laura can also be regarded as an experienced writer, which makes her a less ‘naive’ language user than the other non-professional translators in the present data.

32

BACKGROUND DEI SOGGETTI E FATTORI SOCIO-PSICOLOGICI

Come accennato nelle sezioni precedenti, le caratteristiche inattese del comportamento dei soggetti durante il compito sperimentale possono essere chiarite attraverso la storia personale dei soggetti stessi. Possono fornire spiegazioni anche fattori socio-psicologici, come il concetto di «distanza dal ruolo» delineato da Goffman (2003). Inizierò con un approfondimento sulla storia personale dei soggetti intesa come fattore esplicativo, per poi descrivere i modelli di comportamento che ritengo siano potenziali manifestazioni di distanza dal ruolo, in questo studio.

Il primo esempio di storia personale dei soggetti come fattore esplicativo riguarda uno dei traduttori non professionali, Laura. Come accennato nella sezione 4.1., Laura aveva scritto la sua tesi dottorale in inglese. Nel corso della sua carriera professionale aveva anche scritto relazioni sulla sua ricerca sia in inglese sia in finlandese e aveva quindi notevole esperienza nel riferire i propri pensieri in due lingue. Nida sostiene (1964: 242) che «se una persona svolge la funzione di traduttore, deve avere avuto molta esperienza nel passaggio da una lingua all’altra». Nonostante Laura non avesse esperienza nel campo della traduzione, come ha affermato esplicitamente nel questionario sul background dei soggetti, aveva accumulato molta esperienza nel passaggio da una lingua all’altra. Di conseguenza, sembra anche che Laura si fosse distaccata dall’approccio “scolastico” alla traduzione e fosse in grado di produrre un testo in un finlandese relativamente scorrevole e idiomatico. Inoltre, Laura può essere considerata una professionista della scrittura, il che fa di lei un utente del linguaggio meno “ingenuo” rispetto agli altri traduttori non professionali, in questo studio.

33

However, Laura’s liberal views of translating are not entirely unproblematic. Laura treats the ST as if it were her own creation; as a result, her translation is factually vague, even incorrect, at places. This can be illustrated by two examples. The first of these relates to the translation of the ST phrase ‘mop all the excess fats’. Laura translated this as poistaa kaikki ylimääräiset rasvakudokset (‘remove all the excess fatty tissues’). Laura’s verbalisations indicate that she did not stop to ponder what kind of fats are meant here, but she simply weighed alternative Finnish expressions, rasvakerrokset and rasvakudokset (‘layers of fat’ and ‘fatty tissues’), and eventually chose the one which to her seemed to be more idiomatic Finnish. As a result, her translation of the phrase is factually incorrect, since the ST is concerned with the types of fats contained in blood, for instance, and not with the visible fatty tissues in a human body. Laura may also have been misled by the headline, which talks about staying slim, or she may have failed to utilise textual information which would have made clear the nature of the ‘fats’ referred to.

The second example deals with Laura’s translation of the expression ‘to feed a diet to rats’. Her solution runs as follows: rotat noudattivat epätavallisen rasvaista ruokavaliota (‘rats followed an unusually fatty diet’). Here, as elsewhere, Laura’s main concern was to find idiomatic TL expressions by using the ST only as a relatively flexible framework for the search. As a consequence, Laura’s translation in the above example involves a shift in meaning; the Finnish expression noudattaa roukavaliota implies that the rats chose be on a fatty diet, instead of being forced to eat whatever the experimenters decided to feed them.

34

Tuttavia, la concezione libera che Laura ha della traduzione non è del tutto acritica. Laura tratta il prototesto come fosse una creazione propria; ne consegue una traduzione di fatto vaga, in alcuni punti anzi scorretta. Questo può essere dimostrato attraverso due esempi. Il primo riguarda la traduzione della frase «mop all the excess fats» [eliminare tutti i grassi in eccesso]. Laura ha tradotto «poistaa kaikki ylimääräiset rasvakudokset» («rimuovere tutti i tessuti adiposi in eccesso»). Come indicano le verbalizzazioni, Laura non si è fermata a pensare a che tipo di grassi alludesse il testo, ma ha semplicemente valutato le alternative espressioni finlandesi, «rasvakerrokset» e «rasvakudokset» («strati di grasso» e «tessuti adiposi»), e infine ha scelto quella che secondo lei era la più idiomatica in finlandese. Ne risulta una traduzione denotativamente scorretta, visto che il prototesto prende in considerazione i tipi di grassi contenuti nel sangue, per esempio, ma non i tessuti adiposi visibili nel corpo umano. Probabilmente Laura è stata fuorviata dal titolo, che parla di mantenere la linea, o forse non ha utilizzato le informazioni testuali che avrebbero chiarito la natura dei grassi cui si fa riferimento.

Il secondo esempio riguarda il modo in cui Laura ha tradotto l’espressione «to feed a diet to rats» [sottoporre i ratti a una dieta]. Ha risolto in questo modo: «rotat noudattivat epätavallisen rasvaista ruokavaliota» («i ratti hanno seguito una dieta insolitamente grassa»). Qui, come in altri punti, la preoccupazione principale di Laura è stata quella di trovare espressioni idiomatiche da inserire nel metatesto, servendosi del prototesto solo come un modello di riferimento relativamente flessibile per la ricerca. Di conseguenza, la traduzione dell’espressione nell’esempio comporta un cambiamento di significato; il finlandese «noudattaa roukavaliota» significa che i ratti hanno scelto di seguire una dieta ricca di grassi, e non che sono stati costretti a mangiare tutto quello che gli sperimentatori gli davano.

35

In sum, Laura seems to work exclusively with her own ‘text’ as it were and ignore what is the ST saying1. While translators always work with their own interpretation of the ST, it seems that Laura has taken this one step further: she is working with her own response to the ST and not checking it against the ST. Tirkkonen-Condit (1992) reports on a similar finding in an experiment with a professional translator and a subject specialist as subjects (Pöntinen and Romanov 1989). One of the significant differences between the two was that while the subject specialist relied on her own world knowledge, the professional translator used a great deal of textual knowledge to be able to determine what the ST was saying. Laffling (1993: 124f.), in turn, draws attention to a similar incident reported in Krings (1988a) of a professional translator overlooking textual information and relying (misguidedly) on her own encyclopedic knowledge instead. These findings illustrate the complicated nature of translating; while understanding a text is necessarily subjective, in translation the subjective interpretation is usually checked against the ST to maintain a balance between the ST author’s ideas and the translator’s interpretation of them. In sum, Laura’s experience in language shifting seems to have been a double-edged sword; on the one hand, it has freed her from the confines of the ST and helped her produce a relatively fluent Finnish text. On the other hand, Laura ignores the ST to such an extent that her translation contains wrong information.

1 The two examples discussed here differ in their gravity as translation ‘errors’. The former I would regard as an error because it changes the meaning; i.e. it promises a slimming effect which is not in the text. (The headline may have influenced this interpretation as well). The latter, however, I would consider as a borderline case; although it gives the wrong idea, the effect is humorous rather than disastrous, which could be acceptable in a text to be published in the target column.

36

In breve, pare che Laura lavori, per così dire, esclusivamente con il proprio “testo” ignorando il contenuto del prototesto.2 Mentre i traduttori lavorano sempre con la propria interpretazione del prototesto, pare che Laura abbia fatto un passo avanti: lavora con la sua personale risposta al prototesto senza confrontarla con il prototesto. Tirkkonen-Condit (1992) parla di un risultato simile in un esperimento che aveva come soggetti un traduttore professionale e una specialista in materia (Pöntinen e Romanov 1989). Una delle differenze più significative tra i due era che mentre la specialista in materia si basava sulla propria conoscenza del mondo, il traduttore professionale utilizzava moltissime informazioni testuali per essere in grado di determinare il contenuto del prototesto. Laffling (1993: 124f.), a sua volta, pone l’attenzione su un caso simile descritto in Krings (1998a) riguardo a una traduttrice professionale che ignorava le informazioni testuali basandosi invece (in modo fuorviante) sulla propria cultura enciclopedica. Questi risultati illustrano la complicata natura del processo traduttivo; mentre la comprensione di un testo è necessariamente soggettiva, nella traduzione, l’interpretazione soggettiva viene solitamente messa a confronto con il prototesto, per mantenere un equilibrio tra le idee dell’autore del prototesto e l’interpretazione delle stesse da parte del traduttore. Per concludere, l’esperienza di Laura nel passare da una lingua all’altra si è rivelata un’arma a doppio taglio: da una parte, l’ha liberata dai vincoli del prototesto e l’ha aiutata a produrre un testo in un finlandese relativamente scorrevole; dall’altra, Laura ignora il prototesto a tal punto che la sua traduzione contiene informazioni errate.

2 I due esempi qui analizzati differiscono per la loro gravità di “errori” di traduzione. Considererei il primo un errore, perchè comporta un cambiamento del significato; infatti, promette un effetto dimagrante, non menzionato nel testo (questa interpretazione potrebbe anche essere stata influenzata dal titolo). Tuttavia, considererei il secondo un caso limite; nonostante trasmetta l’informazione sbagliata, l’effetto è comico e non disastroso, e potrebbe essere accettato in un testo da pubblicare in quel periodico.

37

The second example of personal history as an explanation concerns Penny, a professional translator whose translation was rated as ‘mediocre’. Penny’s verbalisations as well as her comments in the follow-up letter (see examples below) imply that her experience with translating medical texts resulted in her translating for the wrong audience in the experiment. This observation is linked to the effects of the experimental situation. In cognitive psychology (e.g. Saariluoma 1988b: 56), it has been observed that in problem- solving situations subjects often make so-called cognitive errors, i.e. the subjects do not perceive the situation correctly and, as a result, are not able to collect and utilise all the information relevant to successful task performance. Cognitive errors take place in ‘natural’ problem-solving situations, too, but it stands to reason that the additional strain created by the experimental situation might increase their probability.

Evidence of Penny’s misinterpretation of the task is shown in example (4). Here Penny decides to retain the original English explanation of ‘NADPH’ in the translation, because she thinks that the readers of the translation will be familiar with the acronym. This implies that the potential readers Penny has in mind were experts in medicine rather than ordinary newspaper readers.
(4) ja (.) sitten laitan sulkuihin ihan tos englanninkielisessä

kirjotusasuasussaan tää nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hybri-hybridi
mä en tietäs muita mitää muuta ku että se on fosfaattihybridi mutta (2.0) mut touta (1.0) mä luulen että (.) et et ne ihmiset jotka (3.0) tai olenkin varma et et (.) et joille toi NADPH jotaki tarkottaa ni (1.0) ni ne he (.) he tietää sen ihan tolla lyhenteellä (.) (Penny: P)

38

Il secondo esempio di storia personale come fattore esplicativo riguarda Penny, una traduttrice professionale la cui traduzione è stata giudicata «mediocre». Le verbalizzazioni di Penny e i commenti contenuti nella lettera di follow-up (vedi esempio sottostante) implicano che la sua esperienza nel tradurre testi medici l’ha indotta a rivolgere la traduzione dell’esperimento a un pubblico non adeguato. Quest’osservazione è legata all’influenza esercitata dalla situazione sperimentale. Nella psicologia cognitiva (per esempio, Saariluoma 1988b: 56), è stato osservato che in situazioni di problem-solving i soggetti commettono spesso i cosiddetti «errori cognitivi»; non interpretando la situazione nel modo corretto, non sono in grado di raccogliere e utilizzare tutte le informazioni rilevanti per svolgere con successo il compito. Si fanno errori cognitivi anche in situazioni di problem-solving “naturali”, ma va da sé che la maggiore tensione creata dalla situazione sperimentale può aumentare la loro occorrenza.

L’esempio (4) fornisce alcune prove del travisamento da parte di Penny. Qui Penny decide di mantenere la spiegazione inglese originale di «NADPH», perchè pensa che i lettori della traduzione conoscano l’acronimo. Questo implica che i lettori modello che Penny aveva in mente fossero esperti di medicina e non normali lettori di un giornale.
(4) ja (.) sitten laitan sulkuihin ihan tos englanninkielisessä

kirjotusasuasussaan tää nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hybri-hybridi

mä en tietäs muita mitää muuta ku että se on fosfaattihybridi mutta (2.0) mut touta (1.0) mä luulen että (.) et et ne ihmiset jotka (3.0) tai olenkin varma et et (.) et joille toi NADPH jotaki tarkottaa ni (1.0) ni ne he (.) he tietää sen ihan tolla lyhenteellä (.) (Penny: P)

39

and (.) then I’ll put that in brackets using that English spel- spelling this NICOTINEAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE PHOSPHATE HYBRI-hybride
I wouldn’t know any other parts except that it is phosphate hybride but (2.0) but well (1.0) I think that (.) that that those people who (3.0) or actually I’m sure that (1.0) those for whom that NADPH means something (1.0) that that they (.) will be familiar with the abbreviation

As Penny did not refer explicitly to the translation brief during the experiment, it was underlined in the post-experimental questionnaire (cf. section 4. 4.). In the post-experimental stage, Penny crossed out the English explanation of ‘NADPH’ as well as the source reference to ‘Experientia’. In the follow-up letter Penny gave the following comment (my translation from English) on both omissions:

(5) I leave these out now that I know where the translation will be published. Somehow I thought in the experiment that the intention was to produce a translation which would be as faithful to the original as possible. Therefore I did not ask, at least not explicitly, where the translation will be published. (Penny: P)

Penny’s comment corroborates the assumption that she ignored the task description in the experiment. In fact, she seems to suspect that she has been deliberately misled in this respect. It is highly probable that when Penny saw, in the somewhat unnerving experimental situation, what the source text dealt with, she immediately slipped into her old familiar role as a medical translator.

40

e (.) allora quello lo metto tra parentesi usando quello spel- spelling inglese questo NICOTINEAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE PHOSPHATE HYBRI-hybride
non saperi cosa siano tutte le altre parti a parte che è un fosfato ma (2.0) ma be’ (1.0) penso che (.) che che quelle persone che (3.0) o a dire il vero sono sicura che (1.0) coloro per i quali quel NADPH significa qualcosa (1.0) che loro loro (.) conosceranno l’abbreviazione

Visto che, durante l’esperimento, Penny non ha fatto esplicitamente riferimento al translation brief, ciò è stato sottolineato nel questionario post- sperimentale (cfr. sezione 4.4.). Nella fase post-sperimentale, Penny ha cancellato la spiegazione inglese di «NADPH» così come la fonte di riferimento «Experientia». Nella lettera di follow-up, Penny ha commentato come segue (mia traduzione dal finlandese) su entrambe le omissioni:

(5) Ora che so dove verrà pubblicata la traduzione, lascio via queste. Per qualche ragione, durante l’esperimento, ho pensato che l’intenzione fosse quella di produrre una traduzione che fosse fedele il più possibile all’originale. Perciò non ho chiesto, o per lo meno non esplicitamente, dove sarebbe stata pubblicata la traduzione (Penny:P)

Il commento di Penny conferma l’ipotesi secondo la quale avrebbe ignorato la descrizione del compito dell’esperimento. Infatti, in questo senso, sembra che Penny sospetti di essere stata fuorviata deliberatamente. È molto probabile che, all’interno di una situazione sperimentale alquanto snervante, quando ha visto di che cosa trattava il prototesto, Penny sia immediatamente ricaduta nel suo vecchio e familiare ruolo di traduttrice di testi medici.

41

As a result, she overlooked the translation brief and translated the text for a wrong target group, which may explain the lower-than-expected quality of her translation.3 Penny’s behaviour seems a particularly conspicuous example of a cognitive error, i.e. misinterpreting the situation and therefore not being able to use all the information relevant to successful task performance. However, and somewhat more alarmingly, Penny’s implicit assumption that a faithful translation was required could also reflect her understanding (and her experiences) of the variety of translating prevailing in translator training.

The third example of the role of personal history relates to Lucy’s (professional translator) poor success in the experimental task. Lucy differed from the other professional translators in terms of her occupation; she worked as a ‘business correspondent’, while Fran, John and Penny worked as free lance translators at the time. Lucy also reported that she worked with four non-native languages, whereas the free lance translators reported only two (in fact, Fran reported that she worked almost solely with English). As a consequence, the working conditions of Lucy vs. the other professionals can be assumed to be quite different. According to Toury (1984: 191), ‘the norms which govern [the] ‘well-formedness’ of translated utterances involve, like any other norm, sanctions’. The nature of these sanctions, which partly determine how the translator approaches each translation task, depends on the nature of each translating situation.

3 In spite of the ‘cosmetic’ revisions (i.e. the above-mentioned omissions), Penny’s translation remained too difficult for the target column. It is possible that Penny used heavy structures with low readability, because she was translating for an expert audience.

42

Di conseguenza, ha ignorato il translation brief e ha tradotto il testo per un lettore modello errato, fatto che spiegherebbe perchè la qualità della sua traduzione deluda le aspettative.4 Il comportamento di Penny sembra un esempio particolarmente evidente di errore cognitivo, ossia travisare la situazione e quindi non essere in grado di usare tutte le informazioni rilevanti per una buona riuscita del compito. Tuttavia, e in modo più allarmante, il fatto che Penny abbia implicitamente supposto che venisse richiesta una traduzione fedele, riflette la sua conoscenza (e la sua esperienza) del tipo di traduzione prevalente nella formazione professionale dei traduttori.

Il terzo esempio del ruolo della storia personale riguarda gli scarsi risultati ottenuti da Lucy (traduttrice professionale) durante il compito di traduzione sperimentale. Lucy si distingueva dagli altri traduttori professionali per la sua occupazione: era corrispondente commerciale, mentre Fran, John e Penny al momento erano traduttori free lance. Lucy ha dichiarato di lavorare con quattro lingue B, mentre i traduttori free lance solo con due (in realtà, Fran ha dichiarato di lavorare quasi esclusivamente con l’inglese). Di conseguenza, potremmo ipotizzare che le condizioni di lavoro di Lucy fossero abbastanza diverse rispetto a quelle degli altri professionisti. Secondo Toury (1984: 91), «le norme che governano la “bella forma” delle frasi tradotte implicano, come qualsiasi altra norma, delle sanzioni». La natura di queste sanzioni, che in parte determinano il tipo di approccio del traduttore ad ogni lavoro di traduzione, dipende dalla natura di ogni situazione traduttiva.

4 Nonostante la revisione “superficiale” (le omissioni sopraccitate), la traduzione di Penny è ancora troppo difficile per il periodico a cui è destinata. È possibile che Penny abbia usato delle strutture complicate con un basso grado di leggibilità, perché stava traducendo per un pubblico esperto.

43

Even though Toury clearly refers to translation quality (‘well-formedness’) here, it could be argued that the demands and sanctions imposed upon translators often relate to both quantity and quality of translating. Usually the translator must compromise between the opposed demands of quality and quantity, but, in some translating situations the emphasis is clearly on quantity, that is, the translator is expected to produce enormous quantities of text and to do it fast.

Lucy’s behaviour in the experiment seems to indicate that the sanctions imposed upon Lucy as a translator have emphasised speed and efficiency to such an extent that the quality of the product is affected. Lucy’s attitude towards the use of time can be illustrated by her comment in our telephone conversation about scheduling the experiment. I told Lucy that the experiment would take about one hour. When she found out how short the source text was, she burst into laughter and said: ‘If I spent one hour for translating such short texts I would’ve been fired ages ago!’ Lucy’s comment points to a ‘quantitative’ attitude to translation, i.e. a short source text will take only a short time to translate. In contrast, a ‘qualitative’ attitude to translation would imply, among other things, that before any estimate can be made as to how long the translation process is likely to take, one should at least see the source text. Moreover, Lucy’s above comment reveals the nature of the sanctions imposed upon her: ‘If you do not work fast, you will be fired’.5

Lucy’s attitudes can also be observed in the excerpt in example (6) in which she is working on the medical term ‘NADPH (nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hybride)’.

5 Here we could also talk about translational ‘sub-cultures’ to refer to the translational norms prevailing in different working environments (cf. chapter 6)

44

Anche se Toury si riferisce chiaramente alla qualità della traduzione (“bella forma”), qui, si può affermare che le esigenze e le sanzioni imposte ai traduttori spesso riguardano sia la quantità sia la qualità della traduzione. Solitamente il traduttore deve trovare un compromesso tra le esigenze opposte di qualità e quantità, ma in alcune situazioni traduttive l’enfasi è chiaramente posta sulla quantità, quindi ci si aspetta che il traduttore produca enormi quantità di testo, e che lo faccia velocemente.

Il comportamento di Lucy durante l’esperimento sembra indicare che le sanzioni imposte al suo ruolo di traduttrice hanno enfatizzato la velocità e l’efficienza a tal punto da compromettere la qualità del prodotto. L’atteggiamento di Lucy riguardo all’uso del tempo può essere chiarito dal suo commento durante la nostra telefonata per la programmazione dell’esperimento. Ho detto a Lucy che l’esperimento sarebbe durato circa un’ora. Quando ha visto quanto era breve il testo, è scoppiata a ridere e ha detto: «Se ci mettessi un’ora a tradurre un testo così breve, mi avrebbero licenziata da un bel pezzo!». Il commento di Lucy rivela un approccio “quantitativo” alla traduzione: la traduzione di un prototesto breve dovrà richiedere un lasso di tempo breve. Al contrario, un approccio “qualitativo” alla traduzione implicherebbe, tra le altre cose, che prima di poter avanzare qualsiasi tipo di ipotesi sul tempo che il processo traduttivo potrebbe richiedere, bisognerebbe almeno leggere il prototesto. Inoltre, il commento di Lucy sopraccitato, rivela la natura delle sanzioni a lei imposte: «Se non lavori in fretta, verrai licenziata».6

Possiamo osservare l’atteggiamento di Lucy nell’estratto portato come esempio (6) nel quale sta lavorando al termine medico «NADPH (nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hybride)».

6 Qui si potrebbe anche parlare di “sottoculture” traduttive, per far riferimento alle norme traduttive prevalenti nei diversi ambienti di lavoro (cfr. Capitolo 6)

45

After writing down the acronym, Lucy reads aloud the first two components of the explanation, after which she points out that the easiest way of solving the problem would be to call up a doctor. Lucy makes this decision rather quickly (in two or three seconds) and effortlessly (i.e. it is clearly a non-problematic decision).

(6) jonka lyhenne (5.0) on N A P (1.0) eiku D (.) P H (2.0) nikotiiniamidi adeniini ni ni di di di (1.0)

ja tätä tällästä minä en edes etsi sanakirjasta koska (1.0) hyvin paljon helpommalla pääsee ku soittaa jollekii lääkärille (2.0) (Lucy:P)

whose abbreviation (5.0) is N A P (1.0) no D (.) P H (2.0) nicotineamide adenine ne ne de de de (1.0)

and this sort of a term I won’t even look for in a dictionary because (1.0) you get off much more easily when you call up some doctor

Example (6) illustrates Lucy’s inclination to high efficiency; she does not want to waste time on trying to find the Finnish term in reference books and simply points to the easiest and quickest way to solve the problem. Admittedly, asking for expert help with terminological problems is in principle sound professional practice. However, Lucy did not call up a doctor to check the Finnish term; thus her translation remained incomplete. This also seems to imply that she was not motivated enough to produce a refined translation product (cf. section 5. 2. 2. 3.).

On the basis of these observations it can be argues that Lucy’s view of the qualities of a good translator seems to be more or less quantitative; that is, she seems to place most weight on speed and efficient problem-solving in translation.

46

Dopo aver scritto l’acronimo, Lucy legge ad alta voce le prime due parole della spiegazione, dopo di che fa notare che il modo più semplice per risolvere il problema sarebbe telefonare a un dottore. Lucy prende questa decisione abbastanza in fretta (in due o tre secondi) e spontaneamente (è chiaramente una decisione non problematica).

(6) jonka lyhenne (5.0) on N A P (1.0) eiku D (.) P H (2.0) nikotiiniamidi adeniini ni ni di di di (1.0)

ja tätä tällästä minä en edes etsi sanakirjasta koska (1.0) hyvin paljon helpommalla pääsee ku soittaa jollekii lääkärille (2.0) (Lucy: P)

la cui abbreviazione (5.0) è N A P (1.0) no D (.) P H (2.0) nicotinamide adenin ne ne di di di (1.0)
e questo genere di termini non lo cercherò nemmeno sul dizionario perchè (1.0) perchè te la cavi molto più semplicemente se chiami un dottore

L’esempio (6) dimostra l’inclinazione di Lucy verso l’alta efficienza; non vuole sprecare tempo cercando di trovare il termine finlandese in testi di consultazione e semplicemente indica il modo più facile e veloce di risolvere il problema. In verità, chiedere l’aiuto di un esperto per i problemi terminologici è una pratica professionale valida. Tuttavia, Lucy non ha chiamato un dottore per controllare il termine finlandese e, di conseguenza, la sua traduzione è rimasta incompleta. Questo sembra anche implicare che non era abbastanza motivata per produrre una traduzione raffinata (cfr. sezione 5.2.2.3.).

Sulla base di queste osservazioni, è possibile sostenere che la concezione che Lucy ha delle qualità di un buon traduttore è per lo più quantitativa; infatti, in ambito traduttivo, sembra dare più peso alla velocità e all’efficienza nel problem-solving.

47

These are naturally desirable qualities of all translators; however as far as the experimental translation task is concerned, the emphasis on quantity has clearly resulted in low quality. However, it should be stressed that Lucy’s poor success in translating may be limited to the experimental situation; her conduct may be successful in translating routine texts on the job.

Lucy’s nonchalant translational behaviour can also be explained through social-psychological factors, namely by looking at the subjects’ role behaviour in the experiment. It seems that role theory, particularly the notion of role distance (Goffman 1961)7 can offer useful insights for understanding the subjects’ behaviour (see also Jääskeläinen 1996b).

In role theory human behaviour is analysed in terms of the roles people perform in society. Goffman (1961: 93) defines roles as ‘the typical response of individuals in a particular position’. However, people do not always produce ‘the typical response’ expected of them, i.e. people do not always live up to their roles. Goffman therefore maintains that typical roles must ‘be distinguished from the actual role performance of a concrete individual in a given position’ and, it could be added, in a given situation. Roles carry with them a large array of expectations which serve to identify individuals; in a sense, we are defined (correctly or incorrectly) by our roles. Furthermore, roles involve norms which govern the behaviour of individuals in particular positions. Consequently, roles are closely related to issues of self-image and the image conveyed to other people, which may or may not coincide. According to Goffman (1961: 87):

7 I am grateful to Stephen Condit for bringing this reference to my attention.

48

Queste sono qualità naturalmente auspicabili in tutti i traduttori; tuttavia, per quanto riguarda il compito di traduzione sperimentale, l’enfasi sulla quantità ha chiaramente portato a una bassa qualità. Ad ogni modo, bisogna sottolineare che l’esito mediocre ottenuto da Lucy nella traduzione potrebbe essere limitato alla situazione sperimentale; in ambito lavorativo, il suo comportamento potrebbe portare risultati positivi nella traduzione di testi di routine.

Il comportamento disinvolto di Lucy nel tradurre può essere chiarito anche attraverso fattori socio-spicologici, ossia osservando il comportamento di ruolo dei soggetti durante l’esperimento. Pare che la teoria dei ruoli, in particolare il concetto di distanza dal ruolo (Goffman 2003)8, possa offrire intuizioni utili per comprendere il comportamento dei soggetti (vedi anche Jääskeläinen 1996b).

Nella teoria dei ruoli, il comportamento umano è analizzato in base al ruolo che le persone svolgono nella società. Goffman (2003: 108) definisce il ruolo come «la risposta tipica degli individui che si trovano in una posizione particolare». Tuttavia, le persone non sempre producono «la risposta tipica» che da loro ci si aspetta, cioè non sempre tengono fede al loro ruolo. Perciò Goffman sostiene che «si deve distinguere il ruolo tipico dall’esecuzione di ruolo effettiva da parte di un individuo concreto in una data posizione» e, potremmo aggiungere, in una data situazione. I ruoli portano con sé una lunga serie di aspettative che servono a identificare gli individui; in un certo senso, siamo definiti (in modo corretto o no) in base ai nostri ruoli. Inoltre, i ruoli implicano norme che governano il comportamento degli individui in particolari posizioni. Di conseguenza, sono strettamente legati a questioni riguardanti l’immagine di sé e l’immagine trasmessa agli altri, che possono coincidere o no. Secondo Goffman (2003: 103):

8 Sono riconoscente a Stephen Condit per aver sottoposto questo riferimento alla mia attenzione.

49

– in performing a role the individual must see to it that the impressions of him that are conveyed in the situation are compatible with [the] role-appropriate personal qualities effectively imputed to him: a judge is supposed to be deliberate and sober; a pilot, in a cockpit, to be cool; a book-keeper to be accurate and neat doing his work. These personal qualities, — provide a basis of self-image for the incumbent and a basis for the image that his role others9.

In terms of role theory the subjects in the present study were faced with different situations, the professional translators were acting in their familiar role of a ‘translator’ which, presumably, forms a part of their self-image. The non-professional translators, in turn, were asked to act in an unfamiliar role. As a result, there were two kinds of constraints operating within the experimental group. For the professional translators the experimental situation is potentially face-threatening, because it entails exposing a part of their ‘self’ to outside observation. The non-professionals, in turn, may have found the situation threatening because they were asked to perform a role which was outside their competence. Instead, as adults they possessed other roles by which they wished to be defined.

To describe actual role performances of individuals (instead of typical roles on the basis of observing groups of people), Goffman introduces a number of new role concepts (1961: 95ff.), of which the notions of ‘role distance’ and ‘attachment to a role’ seem to have direct relevance to explaining the subjects’ behaviour in the present study.

9 “Role others” refer to the other people invvolved in the situation where roles are performed, i.e. “relevant audiences” (Goffman 1961: 85).

50

[...] nell’eseguire un ruolo, l’individuo deve far sì che le impressioni di se stesso che vengono comunicate nella situazione siano compatibili con le qualità personali appropriate al ruolo che gli sono attribuite nei fatti: si presume che un giudice sia ponderato e non ubriaco; un pilota in una cabina di pilotaggio non deve apparire agitato; un contabile dev’essere preciso e ordinato nel fare il suo lavoro.

Queste qualità personali, [...] forniscono una base per l’immagine del sé, e una base per l’immagine che avranno su di lui i suoi altri di ruolo10.

Per quanto riguarda la teoria dei ruoli, i soggetti di questo studio sono stati sottoposti a diverse situazioni. I traduttori professionali eseguivano il loro abituale ruolo di traduttori che, presumibilmente, fa parte della loro immagine di sé. Ai traduttori non professionali, a loro volta, è stato chiesto di eseguire un ruolo non abituale. Di conseguenza, sul gruppo sperimentale agivano due forzature. Per i traduttori professionali la situazione sperimentale è potenzialmente face-threatening, in quanto richiede l’esposizione di una parte del loro Sé all’osservazione esterna. I traduttori non professionali, a loro volta, potrebbero aver trovato la situazione minacciosa, perchè è stato chiesto loro di svolgere un ruolo al di fuori della loro competenza. In quanto adulti, invece, possedevano altri ruoli in base ai quali desideravano essere definiti.

Per descrivere le effettive performance di ruolo degli individui (anziché il ruolo tipico, sulla base dell’osservazione di gruppi di persone), Goffman introduce alcuni nuovi concetti di ruolo (2003: 105), tra cui i concetti di «distanza dal ruolo» e «attaccamento a un ruolo» sembrano particolarmente rilevanti per spiegare il comportamento dei soggetti in questo studio.

10 «Altri di ruolo» si riferisce alle altre persone coinvolte nella situazione all’interno della quale si svolgono i ruoli, cioè «pubblici rilevanti» (Goffman 1961: 85).

51

Goffman uses the notion of role distance ‘to refer to [the] actions which effectively convey some disdainful detachment of the performer from a role he is performing’ (1961: 110). In contrast, attachment to a role is described as follows (1961: 89)

The self-image available for anyone entering a particular position is one of which he may become affectively and cognitively enamoured, desiring and expecting to see himself in terms of the enactment of the role and the self-identification emerging form this enactment.

As a rule, people are attached to the roles they perform regularly. In fact, Goffman points out that it is considered to be ‘sound mental hygiene for an individual to be attached to the role he performs’ (1961: 89f.). However, on some occasions it may be equally necessary, partly in terms of ‘mental hygiene’, to express detachment from the role which is being performed (see examples below).

Role distancing can be manifested by explanations, apologies or joking which are, according to Goffman, ‘ways in which the individual makes a plea for disqualifying some of the expressive features of the situation as sources of definitions of himself’ (1961: 105). The reasons for expressing role distance, i.e. the functions of role distancing, may vary greatly, depending on the role performer and on the situation. Expressions of role distance may show a general detachment of the role (‘This is not the real me’); alternatively, role distance can also be a momentary escape from a role, to which the role performer is in fact attached. The function of the latter kind of role distance can be, for instance, to secure the functionability of a whole system of roles, which Goffman calls ‘situated activity systems’, such as a surgical operation (Goffman 1961: 126ff.).

52

Goffman usa il concetto di «distanza dal ruolo» «per descrivere atti che comunicano efficacemente un certo sprezzante distacco dell’esecutore da un ruolo che sta eseguendo» (2003: 127). Al contrario, l’attaccamento a un ruolo è descritto come segue (2003: 105):

L’immagine di sé che viene offerta da una certa posizione a chi la occupa può essere qualcosa di cui ci si innamora col cuore e con l’intelletto; non si aspetta altro che di calarsi nel ruolo e di sfruttare i vantaggi in termini di identità che ciò può dare.

Di norma, le persone sono attaccate al ruolo che svolgono regolarmente. In realtà, Goffman fa notare che si considera «buona igiene mentale per un individuo sentirsi attaccato al ruolo che svolge» (2003: 105.). Tuttavia, in alcune occasioni potrebbe essere ugualmente necessario, in parte in termini di «igiene mentale», esprimere la distanza dal ruolo che si sta svolgendo (vedi esempio sottostante).

La distanza dal ruolo può manifestarsi attraverso spiegazioni, scuse o battute che sono, secondo Goffman, «modi in cui l’individuo pretende di screditare alcuni degli aspetti espressivi della situazione in quanto fonti di definizione del suo Sé» (2003: 121). I motivi della manifestazione della distanza dal ruolo, cioè le funzioni della distanza dal ruolo, possono variare molto, in base all’esecutore del ruolo e alla situazione. Le manifestazioni della distanza dal ruolo possono mostrare un generale distacco dal ruolo («questo non è il vero me»); alternativamente, la distanza dal ruolo può anche essere una fuga momentanea dal proprio ruolo, al quale l’esecutore è di fatto attaccato. La funzione dell’ultimo tipo di distanza dal ruolo può essere, per esempio, quella di assicurare la funzionalità di un intero sistema dei ruoli, che Goffman chiama «sistema situato di attività», come le operazioni chirurgiche (Goffman 2003: 111.).

53

As think-aloud experiments cannot be defined as ‘situated activity systems’ in the same sense as surgical operations, the manifestations of role distancing in the present data seem to be connected to the function of role distancing as a form o psychological self-defence. Conspicuous displays of role distancing were observable only in the new data, and in the non-professional subjects’ behaviour in particular. There are two potential reasons for the apparent absence of displays of role distancing in the students’ translation processes. First, Goffman maintains (1961: 139f.) that learners are granted certain liberties in the period of learning, i.e. in the period of ‘role-taking’. The role-taker is allowed to make mistakes which would otherwise be considered discreditable, because ‘he has a learner’s period of grace in which to make them – a period in which he is not yet quite the person he will shortly be, and, therefore, cannot badly damage himself by the damaging expression of his maladroit actions’ (1961: 139). It seems possible that the students of translation see themselves as learners and, therefore, do not feel threatened by exposing themselves to observation n the experimental situation. Second, Goffman argues (1961: 109) that ‘immediate audiences figure very directly in the display of role distance’. In the two parts of my experiment, the immediate audience, i.e. the experimenter, may have occupied a slightly different role. In the first sessions, which were organised to collect data for my pro gradu thesis, the experimenter was ‘just a fellow student’ and, as a result, did not pose any kind of thereat to the students acting as subjects. In the new sessions, in addition to all the subjects having more firmly established roles in society, the experimenter as ‘a researcher’ might also have occupied a slightly different position, which, in turn, might have created a more face-threatening situation favourable to expressions of role distance.

54

Dato che gli esperimenti di think-aloud non possono essere definiti «sistemi situati di attività» al pari delle operazioni chirurgiche, le manifestazioni di distanza dal ruolo in questo studio sembrano legate alla funzione della distanza dal ruolo come forma di autodifesa psicologica. Dimostrazioni evidenti di distanza dal ruolo sono state osservate solo nei nuovi dati, e in particolare nel comportamento dei soggetti non professionali. Ci sono due potenziali cause dell’apparente assenza di manifestazioni della distanza dal ruolo nei processi traduttivi degli studenti. In primo luogo, Goffman afferma (2003: 156) che, durante il periodo di apprendimento, cioè il periodo in cui un individuo comincia a entrare nel proprio ruolo, ai principianti vengono concesse certe libertà. Al principiante viene concesso di commettere errori che altrimenti sarebbero considerati screditanti, perchè «dispone del periodo di grazia dell’apprendista per cui questi sbagli gli sono concessi: un periodo in cui egli non è ancora del tutto la persona che sarà tra poco e non può quindi danneggiare gravemente se stesso con la dannosa manifestazione delle sue azioni maldestre» (2003: 156). È possibile che gli studenti di traduzione si vedano come apprendisti e, perciò, non si sentano minacciati nell’esporsi all’osservazione in una situazione sperimentale. In secondo luogo, Goffman afferma (2003: 126) che «il pubblico presente ha una parte diretta nell’esibizione della distanza dal ruolo». Nelle due parti del mio esperimento, il pubblico presente, cioè lo sperimentatore, avrebbe occupato un ruolo leggermente diverso. Nelle prime sessioni, organizzate per raccogliere dati per la mia tesi di laurea, lo sperimentatore era “solo un compagno di corso” e, di conseguenza, non rappresentava alcun tipo di minaccia per gli studenti soggetti dello studio. Nella nuova sessione, oltre al fatto che tutti i soggetti avevano ruoli ben definiti nella società, lo sperimentatore in qualità di ricercatore avrebbe occupato una posizione leggermente diversa, che, a sua volta, avrebbe potuto creare una situazione più face-threatening che avrebbe favorito la manifestazione della distanza dal ruolo.

55

As was mentioned earlier, the most conspicuous examples of role distancing can be found in the non-professional translators’ (particularly Ann’s, Laura’s and Paul’s) behaviour. As they found themselves performing a role in which they did not feel comfortable, or with which they did not wish to identify themselves, they seemed to want to convince the observers that ‘this is not the real me, you must not take my actions seriously’. This was expressed by constant laughter (especially Ann and Laura) and joking. Consider, for instance, the following examples (verbalisations of interest are printed in bold).

(7) mikä tuo dicky on [D2:POCKETa] (25.0) ohhoh (5.0) dicky (3.0) nyt mie en ymmärrä ei tässä oo kyllä semmosta (laugh)
onks täällä oikein (laugh) (2.0)
dicky heart ku se on istuin (.) auton takaosassa (1.0) paidan etumus (1.0) dicky bird on tipu (3.0) (laugh)

voiks se olla lintusydän (laugh) (8.0)
Ei mut sillä täytyy olla jotain sell merkityksiä joita ei oo tähän laitettu (1.0) pitäskö se sitten olla joku isompi sanakirja (3.0) (Ann:N-P)

what that DICKY is [D2:POCKETa] (25.0) ohhoh (5.0) DICKY (3.0) now I don’t understand here’s no such thing (laugh)
it is correct here (laugh)
DICKY HEART as it’s a seat (.) at the back of a car (1.0) shirt- front (1.0) DICKY BIRD is a birdie (3.0) (laugh)

can it be a bird heart (laugh) (8.0)
no it’s got to have some meanings which haven’t been put here (1.0) should it be a bigger dictionary then (3.0)

56

Come accennato in precedenza, gli esempi più evidenti di distanza dal ruolo possono essere osservati nel comportamento dei traduttori non professionali (in particolare Ann, Laura e Paul). Trovandosi a svolgere un ruolo nel quale non si sentivano a loro agio, o con il quale non volevano identificarsi, sembravano voler convincere gli osservatori che «questo non è il vero me, non devi prendere le mie azioni sul serio ». Questo veniva espresso da riso continuo (in particolare Ann e Laura) e battute. Consideriamo, per esempio, quanto segue (le verbalizzazioni di maggior interesse sono in neretto).
(7) mikä tuo dicky on [D2:POCKETa] (25.0) ohhoh (5.0) dicky (3.0)

nyt mie en ymmärrä ei tässä oo kyllä semmosta (laugh) onks täällä oikein (laugh) (2.0)

dicky heart ku se on istuin (.) auton takaosassa (1.0) paidan etumus (1.0) dicky bird on tipu (3.0) (laugh)

voiks se olla lintusydän (laugh) (8.0)
Ei mut sillä täytyy olla jotain sell merkityksiä joita ei oo tähän laitettu (1.0) pitäskö se sitten olla joku isompi sanakirja (3.0) (Ann:N-P)

cos è quel DICKY [D2:POCKETa] (25.0) ohhoh (5.0) DICKY (3.0) ora non capisco qui non c’è niente del genere (ride)
è giusto qui (ride)
DICKY HEART come se fosse un sedile (.) posteriore dell’auto (1.0) pettino

(1.0) DICKY BIRD è un uccellino (3.0) (ride)
può essere il cuore di un uccello (ride) (8.0)
no deve avere qualche significato che qui non c’è (1.0) dovrebbe essere un dizionario più grande allora (3.0)

57

  1. (8)  nää on aina kauheen vaikeita kääntää nää nimet (2.0)
    (sigh) siis (2.0) Olof Sodimu (.) Peter Joosef ja (1.0) Günter Augusti (1.0) koolla (laugh) (1.0) Kuustaa Augusti (3.0) (Paul:N-P)

    these are always very difficult to translate these names (2.0)
    (sigh) so (2.0) Olof Sodimu (.) Peter Joseph and (1.0) Günter Augusti (1.0) with a K (laugh) (1.0) Kustaa Augusti (3.0)

  2. (9)  mutta (3.0) voisikohan voisiko (1.0) valkosipulista (1.0) kosipulista

    (1.0) olla (1.0)
    käännetään vapaasti
    apua (1.0)
    toi on turha kääntää voisko se nyt pelastaa (1.0) pulasta (1.0) mutta voisiko valkosipulista olla apua
    pannaan näin (1.0)
    pannaan (laugh) olla pelastava enkeli (2.0) (Laura:N-P)

    but (3.0) could could (1.0) garlic (1.0) garlic (1.0) be (1.0)
    let’s translate freely
    of help (1.0)
    that’s unnecessary to translate that could it rescue (1.0) from trouble

    (1.0) but could garlic be of help
    Let’s put it like that (1.0)
    let’s put (laugh) be a rescuing angel (2.0)

    This type of joking, i.e. producing ludicrous or non-sensical translation

variants, which were, furthermore, clearly identifies as such by laughter, was typical of the non-professional translators, and practically non-existent

58

  1. (8)  nää on aina kauheen vaikeita kääntää nää nimet (2.0)
    (sigh) siis (2.0) Olof Sodimu (.) Peter Joosef ja (1.0) Günter Augusti
    (1.0) koolla (laugh) (1.0) Kuustaa Augusti (3.0) (Paul:N-P)

    questi sono sempre difficilissimi da tradurre questi nomi (2.0) (sospira) dunque (2.0) Olof Sodimu (.) Peter Joseph e (1.0) Günter Augusti
    (1.0) con la K (ride) (1.0) Kustaa Augusti (3.0)

  2. (9)  mutta (3.0) voisikohan voisiko (1.0) valkosipulista (1.0) kosipulista

    (1.0) olla (1.0)
    käännetään vapaasti
    apua (1.0)
    toi on turha kääntää voisko se nyt pelastaa (1.0) pulasta (1.0) mutta voisiko valkosipulista olla apua
    pannaan näin (1.0)
    pannaan (laugh) olla pelastava enkeli (2.0) (Laura:N-P)

    ma (3.0) può può (1.0) l’aglio (1.0) aglio (1.0) essere (1.0) provo a tradurre liberamente
    d’aiuto (1.0)
    non è necessario tradurre che può salvare (1.0) dai problemi (1.0) ma l’aglio può essere d’aiuto

    mettiamolo così (1.0)

    mettiamo (ride) essere un angelo salvatore (2.0)

    Questo tipo di battute, cioè delle varianti traduttive grottesche e senza

senso, oltretutto chiaramente identificate come tali dal riso, erano tipiche dei traduttori non professionali, e praticamente inesistenti nel

59

in the other subjects’ behaviour. These examples seem to be expressions of role distancing, which the subjects employed to detach themselves from the translator’s role they had been compelled to perform. In fact, Goffman maintains (1961: 112) that in situation where novices or non-experts are performing an unfamiliar role, manifesting role distance gives the performers some elbow room in which to manoeuvre. By expressing role distancing, the role performer is telling the observers that ‘I am not to be judged by this incompetence’. Goffman also points put that such ‘out-of-character situations can easily be created experimentally by asking subjects to perform tasks that are inappropriate to persons of their kind’ (1961: 112). Even though the non- professional subjects might not have felt that the translation task was inappropriate, they probably did feel that the task was not within their sphere of competence.

As was mentioned earlier, manifestations of role distance are harder to find in the professional translators’ behaviour, with one notable exception, namely Lucy. To my mind, Lucy’s behaviour in the experiment resembled closely Goffman’s description of displays of role distance in what he calls an ‘unserious setting’, i.e. the merry-go-round. Goffman describes the behaviour of the operator of the merry-go-round as follows (1961: 109):

Not only does he show that the ride itself is not – as a ride – an event to him, but he also gets off and on and around the moving platform with grace and ease that can only be displayed by safely taking what for children and even adults would be chances.

The ‘grace and ease’ of Lucy’s decisions to solve problems by contacting experts could be considered as manifestations of role distance.

60

comportamento degli altri soggetti. Questi esempi sembrano manifestazioni di distanza dal ruolo, usata dai soggetti per allontanarsi dal ruolo di traduttore che sono stati obbligati a svolgere. Infatti, Goffman sostiene (2003: 129) che in situazioni in cui gli apprendisti o i non esperti svolgono un ruolo non familiare, la manifestazione della distanza dal ruolo dà loro un certo spazio di manovra. Manifestando la distanza dal ruolo, l’esecutore sta dicendo agli osservatori: «Non devo essere giudicato in base a questa incompetenza». Goffman afferma anche che «analoghe situazioni “fuori personaggio” possono essere create sperimentalmente senza difficoltà; occorre solo chiedere a qualcuno di eseguire compiti che non sono appropriati a persone del suo tipo» (2003: 129). Anche se i soggetti non professionali potrebbero non aver percepito che il compito di traduzione era inappropriato, hanno probabilmente capito che il compito non apparteneva alla loro sfera di competenza.

Come detto in precedenza, è più difficile riscontrare manifestazioni della distanza dal ruolo nel comportamento dei traduttori professionali, con un’importante eccezione, e precisamente Lucy. A mio parere, il comportamento di Lucy durante l’esperimento riproduce nei minimi dettagli l’esibizione della distanza dal ruolo in quello che Goffman chiama «un setting poco serio», vale a dire la giostra. Goffman descrive il comportamento dell’addetto alla giostra come segue (2003: 126):

Non solo egli mostra che la corsa in se stessa non è (in quanto corsa) un evento per lui, ma per di più sale e scende dalla piattaforma in moto con un’eleganza e un’agilità che possono essere ottenuti solo a prezzo di correre tranquillamente dei rischi impensabili per i bambini o anche per gli adulti.

L’«eleganza e l’agilità» delle decisioni di Lucy di risolvere i problemi contattando degli esperti potrebbe considerarsi come una manifestazione di distanza dal ruolo.

61

That is, Lucy seemed to be trying to convey an image of a highly efficient and competent translator, who is in absolute control of the situation. Certainly, had the quality of the translations not been assessed at all, Lucy’s behaviour would, on the surface, have supported the early hypotheses about professional behaviour in translation (cf. section 2. 4.), namely that professional translators rely on automatised processing and are able to sail through translation tasks quickly and effortlessly. However, none of the other professional translators performed the experimental translation task with similar ‘grace and ease’; on the contrary, they spent considerably more time and effort on it. Moreover, there were few instances in their protocols which could be categorised offhand as manifestations of role distancing.

Goffman argues (1961: 130) that a person ‘who manifests much role distance may, in fact, be alienated from the role’, but the opposite may equally well be true, as ‘in some cases only those who feel secure in their attachment may be able to chance the expression of distance’. Without more information about the subjects, it is impossible to say conclusively what might have been the reason for the obvious manifestations of role distancing in Lucy’s behaviour, as opposed to their apparent absence from the other professional translators’ behaviour. However, Goffman contends that (1961: 102):

Whatever the individual does and however he appears, he knowingly and unknowingly makes information available concerning the attributes that might be imputed to him and hence the categories in which he might be placed.

On this basis, we can hypothesise that the differences in the professional translators’ behaviour may imply that they wished (unconsciously) to convey different images of their roles as translators,

62

Sembra cioè che Lucy stia tentando di trasmettere l’immagine di una traduttrice molto efficiente e competente, che ha pieno controllo della situazione. Certamente, se la qualità delle traduzioni non fosse stata valutata, il comportamento di Lucy, in superficie, avrebbe assecondato le prime ipotesi sul comportamento professionale nella traduzione, cioè che i traduttori professionali si basano su esecuzioni automatizzate e sono in grado di superare il compito di traduzione velocemente e senza sforzo. Tuttavia, nessuno degli altri traduttori professionali ha eseguito il compito di traduzione sperimentale con simile «eleganza e agilità»; al contrario, gli hanno dedicato molto più tempo e fatica. Inoltre, nei loro protocolli c’erano pochi esempi classificabili, su due piedi, come manifestazioni di distanza dal ruolo.

Goffman afferma (2003: 145) che una persona «che manifesta molta distanza dal ruolo può essere effettivamente alienata dal ruolo», ma anche l’opposto potrebbe essere vero, in quanto «in certi casi solo quelli che sono certi del loro attaccamento possono essere capaci di rischiare un’espressione di distanza». Senza ulteriori informazioni riguardo ai soggetti, è impossibile dire definitivamente quale potrebbe essere stato il motivo delle evidenti manifestazioni di distanza dal ruolo nel comportamento di Lucy, in contrasto con la loro apparente assenza nel comportamento degli altri traduttori professionali. Tuttavia, Goffman sostiene che (2003: 118):

Qualunque cosa un individuo faccia e quali che siano le sue apparenze, egli, consapevolmente o inconsapevolmente, rende disponibili delle informazioni relative alle qualifiche che possono essergli attribuite e quindi alle categorie in cui può essere collocato.

In base questo, possiamo ipotizzare che le differenze nel comportamento dei traduttori professionali implicano il loro desiderio (inconscio) di trasmettere immagini diverse dei propri ruoli di traduttore,

63

which may, in turn, reflect different self-images. Lucy may have wished to give the impression of a highly efficient translator who knows hoe to solve problems quickly whereas Fran may have aimed at an impression of a conscientious and meticulous translator by behaving in a potentially over- conscientious fashion in the experiment. Obviously there is also the possibility that in an experimental situation subjects may to some extent manipulate (probably unconsciously) their behaviour to please the researcher. Thus Lucy may have behaved with exaggerated ease in the experiment, at the expense of translation quality, while Fran may have overdone her ‘meticulous translator act’. If this is true, it is particularly interesting that Lucy and Fran should have manipulated their behaviour into opposite directions with regard to the demands of quantity vs. quality in translation. This seems to reveal a difference in their (implicit) definitions of a ‘good translator’, as it seems unlikely that they would have wanted to give an example of a ‘bad translator’ in the experiment.

The observations discussed in this section highlight the complexity of investigating translation process, or of any type of human behaviour for that matter. I would like to stress that it is not the purpose of the present study to discredit any of the professional translators who took part in the experiment; the success or failure in the experimental task may have little to do with how they succeed in their own work. However these observations seem to support the hypothesis that professional translators may behave differently when performing routine vs. non-routine tasks. In fact, one of the most plausible explanations for the unexpectedly poor success of the two professional translators, Penny and Lucy, is that they applied a routine approach to a non- routine task. The consequences were less dramatic for Penny, for whom the topic of the ST represented a familiar special field.

64

che possono, a loro volta, riflettere immagini di Sé diverse. Può darsi che Lucy desiderasse dare l’impressione di un traduttore molto efficiente, che sa come risolvere i problemi velocemente, mentre che Fran volesse dare l’impressione di un traduttore scrupoloso e meticoloso comportandosi in modo potenzialmente troppo scrupoloso nell’esperimento. Ovviamente, esiste anche la possibilità che in una situazione sperimentale i soggetti manipolino (probabilmente in modo inconscio) il loro comportamento in una certa misura per assecondare il ricercatore. Perciò Lucy potrebbe essersi comportata con esagerata “agilità” nell’esperimento, ai danni della qualità della traduzione, mentre Fran potrebbe aver esagerato il suo «atto traduttivo meticoloso». Se questo è vero, è molto interessante che Lucy e Fran avrebbero dovuto manipolare i loro comportamenti in direzioni diverse rispetto alle richieste di qualità vs. quantità in traduzione. Questo sembra rivelare una differenza nelle loro definizioni (implicite) di “buon traduttore”, visto che sembra improbabile che nell’esperimento volessero dare l’esempio di “cattivo traduttore”.

L’osservazione esaminata in questa sezione sottolinea la complessità dello studio dei processi traduttivi, o se è per quello, di qualsiasi tipo di comportamento umano. Vorrei sottolineare che non è obiettivo di questo studio screditare i traduttori professionali che hanno preso parte all’esperimento; la buona o la cattiva riuscita nel compito sperimentale può avere poco a che fare con i risultati che ottengono nel loro lavoro. Tuttavia, queste osservazioni sembrano supportare l’ipotesi secondo la quale i traduttori professionali possono comportarsi diversamente a seconda che eseguano compiti di routine o no. Infatti, una delle spiegazioni più plausibili per l’inaspettata poca riuscita delle due traduttrici professionali, Penny e Lucy, è che abbiano usato un approccio abituale per un compito non abituale. Le conseguenze sono state meno accentuate per Penny, per la quale l’argomento del prototesto apparteneva a un campo specifico familiare.

65

7. CONCLUSION

The purpose of the present research was to portray think-aloud protocols as the best suited method for collecting data and investigating the human mind processes, particularly the translation process. At the same time, it presents the problems this verbalizing procedure entails and the limits researchers meet, when trying to compare different TAP experiments.

According to cognitive psychological literature, verbal reports yield valid and reliable data on human thought processes. However, cognitive psychology has always dealt mainly with well-defined problem-solving tasks, for which it is possible to determine a priori correct solutions and problem-solving strategies. Translating, in turn, as a creative and subjective process, represents an fuzzy form of problem-solving. Furthermore, translating and thinking aloud are both verbal tasks, which means that they may draw on the same memory resources, and thus interfere with each other.

To avoid these kinds of problems, researchers tried to use joint translating as a method of data elicitation. Although the studies comparing think-aloud protocols and joint translation have offered interesting results, particularly with regard to didactic applications, these experiments contain other variables, which makes it impossible to state that joint translating would be a better method for studying translating than thinking aloud.

In both cases, it is important to remember that subjects are asked to verbalize their thoughts; this is not a simple task, because it requires them to reorganize their mental discourse into an oral one. And even if experimenters recommend them to say things just as they come to mind, they’ll probably try to communicate their mental ideas in a way other people would understand. Moreover, many other elements, such as the subjects’ personal history, emotional factors, the effect of the experimental situation, fear of failure etc. (cf. section 7), may alter the results of TAP experiments.

More attention should be paid to identifying and isolating these variables by, for example, using pre-experimental testing; then, they should be carefully taken into account when examining the results of verbal reports. The

66

experimental situation should be more carefully analyzed in terms of limitations on time, access to reference material and ST difficulty. Furthermore, the validity and reliability of various methods of data collection in relation to translating should be determined by a study specifically designed for that purpose.

There exists a wide spectrum of research interests in TAP studies on the translation process; for this reason, the methods of analysis have been equally varied, which makes it difficult to use previous methods of analysis in new experiments. There is a lack of experimental tradition in this field and consequently most TAP studies on translating suffer from methodological weakness.

Nevertheless, the great variety of aims and strategies offered by TAP experiments shows the complexity of the translation process, and all the mechanisms and factors involved. Moreover, the peculiarity of every single experiment could represent the starting point for new methods of investigation.

67

APPENDICE: IL TESTO DI RIFERIMENTO PER GLI ESEMPI

Stay slim – eat garlic

Everyone knows that eating fatty foods is no good for you, especially if you have a dicky heart. However, the search for a miracle drug that could safely mop all the excess fats has been somewhat difficult… but could garlic come to the rescue?

O. Sodimu, P. Joseph and K. Augusti at the University of Maidugari in Nigeria, fed an exceptionally fatty diet to rats. Not surprisingly, the creatures accumulated cholesterol in their blood, liver and kidneys. But adding garlic oil to the same high-fat diet prevented the rise in the fatty constituents: cholesterol, triglycerides, and total lipids (Experientia, vol 40, p 5).

How does the garlic work? The authors speculate that it knocks out some of the key enzymes involved in making fatty acid or cholesterol. Alternatively, garlic may nobble the energy-carrying compound NADPH (nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hybride), which is necessary for making lipids.

68

RINGRAZIAMENTI

Ringrazio tutte le persone che in un modo o nell’altro, mi hanno supportato e sopportato nel corso di questi anni di studio. Non deve essere stato facile starmi vicino nei miei frequenti momenti di stress e tensione, ma è grazie alla loro presenza, alla loro comprensione, alle loro parole a volte anche dure e ai loro consigli che sono riuscita ad arrivare fin qui.

Ringrazio tutti i professori con cui ho potuto lavorare in questi anni, per i loro insegnamenti non solo scolastici, ma “di vita”, in particolare il professor Bruno Osimo, che oltre ad avermi seguito nella stesura di questa tesi, è stato disponibile e gentilissimo nell’offrirmi ascolto e consigli importanti.

Un ringraziamento speciale ai miei genitori, che hanno sempre creduto in me, nella mia determinazione, e mi hanno sempre dato la libertà di scegliere la strada che volevo seguire.

Grazie ai miei fratelli, che nonostante tutto mi vogliono bene.
Grazie alla nonna che si è sempre ricordata le date dei miei esami. Grazie ad Andrea e alla sua famiglia, da cui ho sempre ricevuto

sostegno, comprensione, conforto, simpatia e una casa dove rifugiarmi a studiare.

Grazie a Silvia, con cui ho condiviso bellissimi anni di faticosi ma soddisfacenti studi.

69

RIFERIMENTI BIBLIOGRAFICI

ARNTZ R. AND THOME G. (a cura di) 1990 Übersetzungswissenschaft. Ergebnisse und Perspektiven. Festschrift für Wolfram Wilsszum 65. Geburtstag, Tübingen, Narr.

BERNARDINI S. 1999 Using think-aloud protocols to investigate the translation process: methodological aspects, Bologna, University of Bologna.

BEYLARD-OZEROFF, KRÁLOVA A. J. AND MOSER-MERCER (a cura di) 1998 Translators’ strategies and creativity. Selected papers form the 9th international conference on translation and interpreting, Prague, September 1995, Amsterdam/Philadelphia, John Benjamins.

BÖRSCH S. 1986 Introspective methods in research on interlingual and intercultural communication in House J. and Blum-Kulka S. (a cura di): 195-209.

DANCETTE J. 1994 Comprehension in the translation process: an analysis of think-aloud protocols in Dollerup C. and Lindegaard A. (a cura di): 113- 120.

DIMITROVA E. 2005 Expertise and explicitation in the translation process, Amsterdam /Philadelphia, John Benjamins, ISBN 90-272-1670-3.

DOLLERUP C. AND LINDEGAARD A. (a cura di) 1994 Teaching translation and interpreting 2. Insights, aims, visions, Amsterdam/Philadelphia, John Benjamins, ISBN 90-272-1617-7.

ERICSSON K. A. and SIMON H. A. 1984 Protocol Analysis. Verbal reports as data, Cambridge, MIT Press, ISBN 0-262-55012-1.

ERICSSON K. A. and SIMON H. A. 1993 Protocol Analysis: Verbal reports as data (Revised edition), Cambridge, MIT Press, ISBN 0-262-55023-7.

GERLOFF P. 1986 Second language learners’ reports on the interpretive process: talk-aloud protocols of translation, in House J. and Blum-Kulka S. (a cura di): 243-262.

GOFFMAN E. 1961 Encounters: two studies in the sociology of interaction, Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merill, [trad. it. di Paolo Maranini 2003 Espressione e identità. Gioco, ruoli, teatralità, Bologna, Il Mulino, ISBN 88-15-09079- 7]: 101-174.

HAUTAMÄKI A. (a cura di) 1988b Kognitiotiede, Helsinki, Gaudeamus. 70

HOLZ-MÄNTTÄRI J. (a cura di) 1998 Translationstheorie – Grundlagen und Standorte, Studia translatologica, Ser. A, Vol. 1., Tampere, University of Tampere, ISBN 951-44-2387-9.

HOLZ-MÄNTTÄRI J. AND NORD C. (a cura di) 1993 Traducere navem. Festschrift für Katharina Reiß zum 70. Geburtstag, Tampere, University library, ISBN 951-44-3262-2.

HÖNIG H. G. 1990 Sagen, was man nicht weiß – wissen was man nicht sagt. Überlegungen zur übersetzerischen Intuition in Arntz R. and Thome G. (a cura di): 91-101.

HÖNIG H. G. 1991 Holmes’ “Mapping Theory” and the landscape of mental translation processes in Van Leuven-Zwart K. M. and Naaijkens T. (a cura di): 77-89.

HOUSE J. 1988 Talking to oneself or thinking with others? On using different thinking aloud methods in translation, Fremdsprachen Lehren und Lernen Vol. 17.

HOUSE J. AND BLUM-KULKA S. (a cura di) 1986 Interlingual and intercultural communication. Discourse and cognition in translation and second language acquisition studies, Tübingen, Gunter Narr.

JÄÄSKELÄINEN R. 1993 Investigating Translation Strategies in Tirkkonen- Condit S. and Laffling J. (a cura di): 99-120.

JÄÄSKELÄINEN R. 1999 Tapping the process: an explorative study of the cognitive and affective factors involved in translating, Joensuu, University of Joensuu, ISBN 951-708-734-8.

JENSEN A. 2000 The effects of time on cognitive process and strategies in translation, København, Unpublished PhD thesis, Copenhagen Business School.

JONASSON K. 1998 Degree of a text awareness in professional vs. non- professional translators in Beylard-Ozeroff, Králova A. J. and Moser- Mercer (a cura di): 189-200.

KÖNIGS, F. G. 1987 Was beim Übersetzen passiert: Theoretische Aspekte, empirische Befunde und praktische Konsequenzen, Die Neueren Sprachen.

71

KRAHMER E. and UMMELEN N. 2004 Thinking About Thinking Aloud. A comparison of two verbal protocols for usability testing, Netherlands, Tilburg University, ISSN 0361-1434.

KRINGS H. P. 1986. Translation problems and translation strategies of advanced German learners of French (L2) in House J and Blum-Kulka S. (a cura di): 263-276.

KRINGS H. P. 1988 Thesen zu einer empirischen Übersetzungswissenschaft in Holz-Mänttäri J. (a cura di): 58-71.

KÜNZLI A. 2003 Quelques stratégies et principes dans la traduction technique français-allemand et français-suédois, Stockholm, Akademitryck, ISBN 91- 974284-6-9.

KUSSMAUL P. 1989a Toward an Empirical Investigation of the Translation Process: Translating a Passage from S. I. Hayakawa: Symbol, Status and Personality in Von Bardeleben R. (a cura di): 369-380.

KUSSMAUL P. 1989b Interferenzen im Übersetzungsprozess – Diagnose und Therapie in Schmidt H. (a cura di): 19-28.

KUSSMAUL P. 1993 Empirische Grundlagen einer Übersetzungsdidaktik: Kreativität im Übersetzungsprozeß in Holz-Mänttäri J. and Nord C. (a cura di): 275-286.

KUSSMAUL P. 1994 Möglichkeiten einer empirisch begründeten Übersetzungsdidaktik in Snell-Hornby M., Pöchhacker F. and Kaindl K (a cura di): 377-386.

KUSSMAUL P. 1995 Training the Translator, Amsterdam, John Benjamins, ISBN 9027216231.

KUSSMAUL P. 1998 Die Erforschung von Übersetzungsprozessen: Resultate und Desiserate, München, Lebende Sprachen.

KUSSMAUL P. and TIRKKONEN-CONDIT S. 1995 Think-Aloud Protocol analysis in translation studies, TTR – Traduction Terminologie Rédaction Vol 8 n 1.

LAFFLING J. 1993a Corpus-based analysis dictionary for machine (and human) translation in Tirkkonen-Condit S. and Laffling J. (a cura di): 121-136.

72

LEWANDOWSKA-TOMASZCZYK B. AND THELEN M. (a cura di) 1992 Translation and meaning, Part 2, Maastricht, Rijkshogeschool Maastricht, Faculty of translation and interpreting.

LÖRSCHER W. 1992 Process-Oriented Research into Translation and Implications for Translation Teaching, Neubrandenburg, University of Greifswald.

MATRAT C. M. 1992 Investigating the translation process: thinking-aloud versus joint activity, Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Ann Arbor: University Microfilms International.

NIDA E. A. 1964 Towards a science of translating, Leiden, Brill, ISBN 9004026053

NIELSEN J. 1993 Usability Engineering, Cambridge, Academic Press. NISBETT R. E. and WILSON T. D. 1979 Telling more than we can know: verbal

reports on mental processes, Psychological review.
NORBERG 2003 Übersetzen mit doppeltem skopos. Eine empirische Prozess-

und produktstudie, Uppsala, Uppsala University Library.
PÖNTINEN T. and ROMANOV T. 1989 Professional vs. non-professional translator: a think-aloud protocol study, Joensuu, University of Joensuu,

Savonlinna School of Translation Studies.
SAARILUOMA P. 1988b Ajattelu kognitiivisena prosessina in Hautamäki A. (a

cura di): 43-70.
SANDROCK U. 1982 Thinking-aloud protocols (TAPs). Ein Instrument zur

Dekomposition des Komplexen Prozesses “Übersetzen”, Stockholm, Kassel

Svenska Akademiens ordlista.
SCHMID A. 1994 Gruppenprotokolle – ein Einblick in die black box des

Übersetzens, TexTconTexT 9.
SCHMIDT H. 1993 Interferenz in der Translation, Leipzig, Enzyklopädie, ISBN

3-324-00476-4.
SCHMIDT M. A. 2005 How do you do it anyway? A longitudinal study of three

translator students translating from Russian into Swedish, Stockholm,

Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, ISBN 91-85445-19-3.
SCHRIVER K .A. 1997 Dynamics in Document Design: Creating Text for

Readers, New York, Wiley, ISBN: 978-0-471-30636-8. 73

SÉGUINOT C. 1996 Some thoughts about think-aloud protocols, Target vol. 8, no1: 79-95, Amsterdam, Benjamins, ISSN 0924-1884.

SNELL-HORNBY M., PÖCHHACKER F. AND KAINDL K. (a cura di) 1994 Translation Studies. An Interdiscipline, Amsterdam, John Benjamins, ISBN 1556194781.

SOMEREN M. W., BARNARD Y. F. and SANDBERG J. A. C. (a cura di) 1994 The think aloud method. A practical guide to modelling cognitive processes, London, Academic Press, ISBN 0-12-714270-3.

TIRKKONEN-CONDIT S. 1992 The interaction of world knowledge and linguistic knowledge in the process of translation. A think-aloud protocol study in Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk B. and Thelen M. (a cura di): 433- 440.

TIRKKONEN-CONDIT S. AND LAFFLING J. (a cura di) 1993 Recent Trends in Empirical Translation Research, [Studies in Languages 28.] Joensuu, University of Joensuu, ISBN 951-708-150-2.

TOURY G. 1984 The notino of “native translator” and translation teaching in Wilss W. and Thome G. (a cura di): 186-195.

VAN LEUVEN-ZWART K. M. AND NAAIJKENS T. (a cura di) 1991

Translation Studies, The state of the art. Proceedings of the first James S. Holmes symposium on Translation Studies, Amsterdam, Rodopi, ISBN 90- 5183-257-5.

VON BARDELEBEN R. 1989 Wege amerikanischer Kultur. Ways and Byways of American Culture. Aufsätze zu Ehren von Gustav H. Blanke, Frankfurt am Main, Lang, ISBN 363142454.

WILSS W. AND THOME G. (a cura di) 1984 Die Theorie des Übersetzens und ihr Aufschlusswert für die Übersetzer- und Dolmetscherausbildung Tübingen, Gunter Narr.

74

ILARIA GIANETTO Pensiero e linguaggio in Vygotskij Un glossario

Pensiero e linguaggio in Vygotskij Un glossario

ILARIA GIANETTO

Scuole Civiche di Milano Fondazione di partecipazione Dipartimento Lingue
Scuola Superiore per Mediatori Linguistici via Alex Visconti, 18 20151 MILANO

Relatore Prof. Bruno OSIMO

Diploma in Scienze della Mediazione Linguistica marzo 2006

1

© Lev Semënovič Vygotskij 1934
© Ilaria Gianetto per l’edizione italiana 2006

2

ABSTRACT IN ITALIANO

La candidata presenta un glossario sul lessico vygotskijano tratto dall’opera dello psicolinguista russo intitolata Pensiero e linguaggio; in essa Vygotskij propone un’indagine sul fenomeno da lui denominato «pensiero verbale», riferendosi con questo termine al prodotto della relazione esistente tra pensiero e linguaggio, due facoltà precedentemente considerate l’una indipendente dall’altra o la prima come sottoprodotto della seconda. Vygotskij sviluppa inoltre un nuovo metodo per studiare tale fenomeno; si tratta di un metodo che scompone il pensiero verbale nelle sue unità componenti, ovvero nei prodotti dell’analisi di tale unità globale che ne conservano le proprietà fondamentali. Vygotskij identifica questa unità non decomponibile ulteriormente nel significato della parola, espressione sia della sfera del pensiero sia di quella del linguaggio. Il grande merito dello studioso sta a questo punto nell’aver rivisto le teorie esistenti sul cosiddetto «linguaggio interno» o «endofasia», scoprendone le particolari caratteristiche e regole di funzionamento e studiandone il ruolo di mediatore tra il pensiero e il linguaggio, intuendo cioè che attraverso di esso il pensiero si materializza nella parola e la parola si volatilizza nel pensiero. In ultimo, Vygotskij introduce il concetto di «zona di sviluppo prossimo» per indicare l’area in cui si realizza lo sviluppo potenziale del bambino mediante la collaborazione con un adulto.

Parole chiave: Endofasia, Linguaggio egocentrico, Linguaggio esterno, Linguaggio interno, Linguaggio scritto, Pensiero verbale, Significato, Unità componente, Volatilizzazione, Zona di sviluppo prossimo.

ENGLISH ABSTRACT

The candidate presents a glossary of Vygotsky’s terminology taken from his work Thought and Language. In this work, the Russian psycholinguist analyzes what he calls “verbal thought”, in other words the product of the relationship between thought and language. These two skills were previously considered either as independent one from the other, or the first as a subproduct of the latter. Moreover, Vygotsky develops a new method to study this phenomenon; his method decomposes the verbal thought into component units, into products of the analysis of the global whole, while maintaining its fundamental features. Vygotsky identifies this unit that cannot be further split as the meaning of the word, which involves both the thought area and the language area. The psycholinguist deserves particular praise for having reassessed existing theories on so- called “inner speech” or “endophasy”, discovering its particular features and working out rules and studying its role as mediator between thought and language. Indeed, he realizes that through it, thought materializes into words and words turn into inward thought. Lastly, Vygotsky develops the concept of “zone of proximal development”, meaning the area in which a child’s potential development takes place by means of the collaboration of an adult.

Key words: Endophasy, Egocentric speech, External speech, Inner speech, Written speech, Verbal thought, Meaning, Component unit, Turning of speech into inward thought, Zone of proximal development.

3

ABSTRACT EN ESPAÑOL

La candidata presenta un glosario sobre el léxico de Vygotsky en la obra del psicolingüista ruso titulada Pensamiento y lenguaje; en esa Vygotsky efectúa un estudio sobre el fenómeno che él denomina «pensamiento verbal», haciendo referencia con este término al producto de la relación existente entre pensamiento y lenguaje, dos facultades que antes se consideraban independientes una de otra o la primera como subproducto de la segunda. Además, Vygotsky desarrolla un método nuevo para estudiar este fenómeno; se trata de un método que descompone el pensamiento verbal en sus unidades componentes, o sea, en los productos del análisis de esta unidad global que conservan su propiedades fundamentales. Vygotsky identifica esta unidad no descomponible ulteriormente en el significado de la palabra, expresión tanto de la esfera del pensamiento como de la del lenguaje. El gran mérito del estudioso está, llegados a este punto, en haber revisado las teorías existentes sobre el llamado «lenguaje interior» o «endofasia», al haber descubierto sus particulares características y reglas de funcionamiento y haber estudiado su papel de mediador entre pensamiento y lenguaje, es decir, haber entendido que a través del mismo, el pensamiento se materializa en la palabra y la palabra se volatiliza en el pensamiento. Por último, Vygotsky intoduce el concepto de «zona de desarrollo próximo» para referirse al área en la que se realiza el desarrollo potencial del niño gracias a la colaboración con un adulto.

Palabras clave: Endofasia, Lenguaje egocéntrico, Lenguaje exterior, Lenguaje interior, Lenguaje escrito, Pensamiento verbal, Significado, Unidad componente, Volatilización, Zona de desarrollo próximo.

4

SOMMARIO

ABSTRACT IN ITALIANO………………………………………………………. 3

ENGLISH ABSTRACT …………………………………………………………….. 3

ABSTRACT EN ESPAÑOL ………………………………………………………. 4

SOMMARIO…………………………………………………………………………….. 5

PREFAZIONE – CRITERI DI REDAZIONE ……………………………. 7

GLOSSARIO ……………………………………………………………………………. 9

AGGLUTINAZIONE ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9 APPRENDIMENTO ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 ATTIVITÀ VERBALE……………………………………………………………………………………………….11 ASTRAZIONE ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….11 COMPLESSO …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12 COMPLESSO ASSOCIATIVO …………………………………………………………………………………..14 COMPLESSO A CATENA…………………………………………………………………………………………15 COMPLESSO COLLEZIONE ……………………………………………………………………………………. 15 COMPLESSO DIFFUSO ……………………………………………………………………………………………16 CONCETTO …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17 CONCETTO POTENZIALE……………………………………………………………………………………….17 CONCETTO QUOTIDIANO………………………………………………………………………………………18 CONCETTO SCIENTIFICO……………………………………………………………………………………….19 CONCETTO SPONTANEO………………………………………………………………………………………..20 CONDENSAZIONE ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 20 ENDOFASIA ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 20 EQUIVALENZA DEI CONCETTI………………………………………………………………………………20 FASE AFFETTIVO-VOLITIVA………………………………………………………………………………….20 FASE EMOZIONALE………………………………………………………………………………………………..20 FASE PRE-INTELLETTIVA………………………………………………………………………………………21 FUSIONE CONCRETA ……………………………………………………………………………………………..21 GENERALITÀ …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21 GENERALIZZAZIONE …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22 IDIOMATICITÀ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..23 INFLUENZA DEL SENSO…………………………………………………………………………………………23 INTROSPEZIONE …………………………………………………………………………………………………….23 LEGAME ASSOCIATIVO …………………………………………………………………………………………23 LINGUA ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 23 LINGUA MATERNA…………………………………………………………………………………………………25 LINGUA STRANIERA………………………………………………………………………………………………25 LINGUAGGIO …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 26 LINGUAGGIO AFASICO …………………………………………………………………………………………. 27 LINGUAGGIO EGOCENTRICO ……………………………………………………………………………….. 28 LINGUAGGIO ESTERNO ………………………………………………………………………………………… 29

5

LINGUAGGIO FASICO…………………………………………………………………………………………….30 LINGUAGGIO INTELLETTIVO………………………………………………………………………………..30 LINGUAGGIO INTERNO………………………………………………………………………………………….31 LINGUAGGIO ORALE……………………………………………………………………………………………..33 LINGUAGGIO SCRITTO…………………………………………………………………………………………..33 PAROLA…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..34 PARTECIPAZIONE…………………………………………………………………………………………………..34 PENSIERO ARTIFICIALE…………………………………………………………………………………………34 PENSIERO ASTRATTO…………………………………………………………………………………………….34 PENSIERO CONCRETO……………………………………………………………………………………………35 PENSIERO PER COMPLESSI …………………………………………………………………………………… 35 PENSIERO PER CONCETTI ……………………………………………………………………………………..35 PENSIERO VERBALE………………………………………………………………………………………………35 PERIODO SENSITIVO………………………………………………………………………………………………36 PREDICATIVITÀ ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..36 PRESA DI COSCIENZA…………………………………………………………………………………………….36 PSEUDOCONCETTO………………………………………………………………………………………………..37 RIFERIMENTO ALL’OGGETTO……………………………………………………………………………….38 SEGNO ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 38 SENSO …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 39 SIGNIFICATO ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….40 SINCRETISMO ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 40 SISTEMA DI CONCETTI ………………………………………………………………………………………….41 SOVRAPPOSIZIONE ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 41 SPOSTAMENTO ………………………………………………………………………………………………………41 SUONO ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 41 STRUMENTO DI PRODUZIONE INTELLETTUALE …………………………………………………41 SVILUPPO ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….42 SVILUPPO ARTIFICIALE…………………………………………………………………………………………43 TRATTO DISTINTIVO ……………………………………………………………………………………………..44 UNITÀ COMPONENTE…………………………………………………………………………………………….44 VOCALIZZAZIONE …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 44 VOLATILIZZAZIONE ………………………………………………………………………………………………45 ZONA DI SVILUPPO PROSSIMO …………………………………………………………………………….. 45

APPENDICE DI RIFERIMENTO ITALIANO-INGLESE- SPAGNOLO……………………………………………………………………………. 47

APPENDICE DI RIFERIMENTO INGLESE-ITALIANO- SPAGNOLO……………………………………………………………………………. 49

APPENDICE DI RIFERIMENTO SPAGNOLO-ITALIANO- INGLESE ……………………………………………………………………………….. 51

RIFERIMENTI BIBLIOGRAFICI ………………………………………….. 53

6

PREFAZIONE – CRITERI DI REDAZIONE

Il seguente glossario è stato da me realizzato a partire dall’analisi dell’opera maestra dello psicolinguista russo Lev Semënovič Vygotskij Pensiero e linguaggio. Tale opera viene pubblicata per la prima volta postuma nel 1934; seguono altre due edizioni russe del libro in cui lo scritto viene adattato alle varie imposizioni di censura dettate dal regime dei tempi per quanto riguarda termini di stampo politico e riferimenti a personaggi politici, ed infine, a partire dal 1962 l’opera viene tradotta in almeno tredici lingue, permettendo finalmente al pensiero di Vygotskij di diffondersi in tutto il mondo.

Il presente lavoro si basa sulla settima edizione italiana del 2003 di Luciano Mecacci, il quale ha condotto la traduzione dell’opera direttamente sull’edizione russa del 1934, rispettandone il più possibile la struttura, e sulla prima edizione americana del 1962 di Eugenia Hanfmann e Gertrude Vakar; le citazioni sono tratte, oltre che dalle due edizioni sopra citate, anche da testi on line di analisi e critica dell’opera in lingua italiana, inglese e spagnola.

Per quanto riguarda il metodo di pianificazione del glossario da me adottato, parallelamente al lavoro di lettura dell’intera opera di Vygotskij ho portato avanti in essa un lavoro di individuazione e sottolineatura dei termini su cui si è soffermata nel dettaglio l’indagine di Vygotskij sul pensiero e il linguaggio; quindi ho eseguito la schedatura dell’opera sulla base di tali termini per poter ottenere un quadro generale di ognuno. A questo punto ho fatto seguire un lavoro di selezione dei termini che sarebbero poi diventati le voci del glossario sulla base delle novità apportate da tali termini rispetto alle teorie precedenti a Vygotskij o sulla base della rielaborazione e ricontestualizzazione da parte dello studioso russo di termini già esistenti nel campo della psicologia e della linguistica. Ho incluso nel glossario sia voci riguardanti esplicitamente il pensiero e il linguaggio, sia voci legate ad essi in maniera più indiretta, ma comunque complementari e di fondamentale importanza per una visione il più organica

possibile del tema del lavoro. Una volta pronta la lista di voci da includere nel glossario, ho 7

iniziato la stesura delle definizioni, per le quali mi sono servita in parte delle stesse parole di Vygotskij o dei critici che hanno commentato la sua opera e in parte della mia rielaborazione personale di concetti, analisi e spiegazioni. Ho ritenuto importante optare per delle definizioni il più complete possibili, ma allo stesso tempo sintetiche per rendere la lettura interessante e leggera; quindi, laddove la definizione, per importanza o per grado di difficoltà, comportava una serie di voci minori, ho scelto di suddividere la voce stessa in più voci per facilitarne la consultabilità. L’altra caratteristica che ho impresso al lavoro, oltre alla rapida accessibilità al contenuto delle definizioni, è la massima agevolezza nella consultazione del glossario in generale e in particolare nella consultazione interconnessa delle voci che hanno uno stretto legame tra loro; ho quindi dotato le voci di una rete interna di rimandi, sia dichiarati per iscritto per una versione cartacea del glossario, sia segnalati attraverso collegamenti ipertestuali per una possibile versione on line. Inoltre, una volta terminata la stesura del glossario, durante la rilettura delle voci, ho selezionato alcuni termini interni alle voci stesse con i quali ho creato ulteriori voci di rimando alle definizioni in cui sono contenuti in modo tale da permettere l’individuazione anche di tutti quei termini vygotskijani che costituiscono ad esempio un connotato o una caratteristica di un determinato fenomeno, che non richiedono dunque una definizione a sé stante, ma che meritano comunque una visualizzazione chiara all’interno del glossario. Ho infine affiancato ad ogni voce il traducente inglese e spagnolo e aggiunto al termine del glossario tre appendici di riferimento con le combinazioni linguistiche italiano- inglese-spagnolo, inglese-italiano-spagnolo e spagnolo-italiano-inglese per facilitare la consultazione del glossario da parte di uno straniero.

8

GLOSSARIO AGGLUTINAZIONE [agglutination] [aglutinación]

Vedi LINGUAGGIO INTERNO

APPRENDIMENTO [learning] [aprendizaje]

Vygotskij afferma che «en un proceso natural de desarrollo, el aprendizaje se presenta como un medio que fortalece este proceso natural, pone a su disposición los instrumentos creados por la cultura que amplían las posibilidades naturales del individuo y reestructuran sus funciones mentales (Ivić 1994: 5)», raffinando così la capacità di pensiero. Attraverso il processo di apprendimento nascono nella mente del bambino nuovi tipi di astrazioni (vedi) e generalizzazioni (vedi) che giocano un ruolo di fondamentale importanza nella formazione di concetti (vedi) e di nuovi concetti sulla base dei primi; viene riorganizzata così la struttura concettuale nella mente del bambino.

Vygotskij definisce l’apprendimento come lo “sviluppo artificiale del bambino” e aggiunge che «la educación no se limita únicamente al hecho de ejercer una influencia en los procesos del desarrollo, ya que reestructura de modo fundamental todas las funciones del comportamiento (Vygotskij, citato in Ivić 1994: 7)». Quindi, per Vygotskij l’apprendimento non si riduce ad una mera acquisizione di una certa quantità di informazioni, bensì va a costituire la fonte e il motore trainante dello sviluppo (vedi) e della crescita. L’essenza dell’insegnamento consiste, di conseguenza, nel garantire lo sviluppo fornendo al bambino strumenti, tecniche interiori di pensiero e operazioni di ragionamento.

Le ricerche di Vygotskij mettono in luce come nel momento in cui ha inizio l’apprendimento, i bambini che mostrano un buon rendimento, non presentano il più piccolo segno di maturazione delle premesse psicologiche necessarie per il processo stesso di apprendimento, quali memoria,

9

attenzione, consapevolezza e volontarietà. Queste, in particolar modo le ultime due, sono neoformazioni appartenenti alla sfera delle funzioni psichiche superiori che nascono proprio in età scolare; essendo ancora allo stadio embrionale in questo momento della storia del bambino sono forgiate dall’apprendimento, che ne garantisce un corso adeguato di sviluppo. Risulta quindi che «l’apprendimento si realizza su processi psichici immaturi, che stanno appena iniziando il primo e fondamentale ciclo del loro sviluppo (Vygotskij 2004: 262)∗» ed è proprio questa la chiave del successo dell’apprendimento.

Studiando il rapporto tra apprendimento e sviluppo, Vygotskij ha concluso che il primo va sempre avanti al grado di sviluppo mentale del bambino; tra i due processi non esiste nessun tipo di parallelismo. Sarebbe dunque un errore pensare che le leggi esterne della struttura del processo di insegnamento «coincidano perfettamente con le leggi interne della struttura dei processi di sviluppo che danno vita all’apprendimento. [...] Lo sviluppo non è quindi subordinato al programma scolastico (265-266)»; tuttavia, non vi sono dubbi sul fatto che tra sviluppo e apprendimento vi sia una forte relazione. Vygotskij ha provato che «il pensiero astratto del bambino si sviluppa in tutte le lezioni e il suo sviluppo non si scompone affatto in corsi separati corrispondente alle diverse materie, lungo i quali si divide l’apprendimento scolastico (268)»; infatti, «le differenti materie hanno in parte una base psicologica comune (267)». Ne consegue che l’apprendimento in una materia mette in moto funzioni psichiche che si attiveranno anche nell’apprendimento di altre materie.

L’apprendimento ha dunque la sua struttura interna, la sua logica di sviluppo; interiormente, lo scolaro che apprende ha nella sua mente come una rete interna di processi che, generati e messi in movimento dall’apprendimento, si sviluppano e rifiniscono. Concludendo, per risultare il più fruttuoso possibile, l’apprendimento deve situarsi nella zona di sviluppo prossimo (vedi).

∗ D’ora in avanti le citazioni tratte dall’opera di Vygotskij Pensiero e linguaggio verranno indicate unicamente con il numero della pagina contenente la citazione posto fra parentesi.

10

ATTIVITÀ VERBALE [verbal activity] [actividad verbal] Vedi LINGUAGGIO INTERNO

ASTRAZIONE [abstraction] [abstacción]

Spostamento dalla cosa concreta, dall’oggetto singolo all’idea dell’oggetto in cui l’intelletto si scosta dall’oggetto empirico e ne trae una copia, ovvero il concetto astratto, il quale si colloca nella psiche ad un livello superiore rispetto a quello della percezione concreta. L’astrazione viene considerata dunque come un movimento dal basso verso l’alto e, contrariamente a quanto affermavano teorie precedenti a Vygotskij, non dipende dalla quantità di legami associativi che il soggetto è giunto a stabilire in quel momento, ma da neoformazioni qualitative che normalmente si presentano nella psiche del soggetto a partire dall’adolescenza e che sono supportate da strumenti quale, in modo particolare, «il linguaggio, che è uno degli elementi fondamentali nella costruzione delle forme superiori dell’attività intellettiva (148)», sotto cui risiede, appunto, il processo di astrazione. Il linguaggio, prosegue Vygotskij, «non interviene in modo associativo come una funzione che corre parallelamente, ma in modo funzionale, come un mezzo utilizzato razionalmente (148)» ovvero, è mediante l’uso della parola che il soggetto si concentra sui tratti distintivi dell’oggetto al quale si trova di fronte, li sintetizza per poi dare un simbolo all’oggetto. Non si tratta, quindi, di un’operazione semplice e immediata, di uno sdoppiamento automatico, ma di un processo che matura all’interno dell’individuo lentamente e che dal momento della sua comparsa si potenzia sempre più e si sviluppa.

La capacità di astrazione compare nell’adolescenza durante il processo di formazione dei concetti (vedi) o di attribuzione di significati (vedi), fenomeni per cui è necessario un «uso funzionale della parola o di un altro segno come mezzo per dirigere attivamente l’attenzione, per differenziare e separare i tratti caratteristici (143)» del concetto o del significato in questione. Durante la formazione di un concetto il soggetto riunisce caratteristiche che

11

accomunano determinati oggetti concreti e le disloca nella sfera della memoria e del pensiero astratto sotto uno stesso riferimento all’oggetto. Si tratta dunque di un processo di sintesi, dai vari oggetti concreti con caratteristiche comuni alla copia astratta nel pensiero, appunto il concetto, sotto cui risiedono gli oggetti concreti. Vygotskij scrive infatti che « [...] mediante l’astrazione di tratti, il bambino disloca la situazione concreta, il legame concreto dei tratti e si crea la premessa necessaria per una nuova unificazione di questi tratti su una base nuova (189)», presente in una sfera differente da quella della percezione concreta, quella dell’astratto. I concetti nuovi vengono poi creati sulla base di concetti già esistenti, quindi in questo caso si presuppone un processo di astrazione non più a partire dalla percezione dell’oggetto empirico, bensì già dall’idea dell’oggetto, che viene arricchita e trasportata ad un livello ancora superiore in cui sussistono diversi legami tra i tratti caratterizzanti dell’oggetto rispetto al livello inferiore di partenza di tale astrazione. Si va in questo modo a formare un sistema di concetti sulla base di diversi livelli di astrazione.

Il processo di astrazione costituisce inoltre un tratto caratterizzante del linguaggio interno (vedi) in quanto questo si differenzia dal linguaggio esterno (vedi) proprio per l’assoluto grado di «astrazione del linguaggio dal lato sonoro (355)», il quale rappresenta l’aspetto più concreto della lingua.

COMPLESSO [complex] [complejo]

Il complesso rappresenta un concetto (vedi) nella sua forma embrionale, è il frutto del pensiero del bambino fino all’età pre-adolescenziale nell’organizzazione mentale della sua esperienza concreta. Si tratta del secondo livello di generalizzazione (vedi) seguente il sincretismo (vedi); costituisce dunque una delle prime fasi di raggruppamento di oggetti in un unico insieme precedente la fase di formazione di un concetto vero e proprio. Come nel concetto, anche nel caso di un complesso vi è la comparsa di rapporti tra differenti percezioni concrete, la riunione e

12

generalizzazione degli oggetti isolati, nonché l’organizzazione e sistematizzazione dell’esperienza. «Ma, il modo di riunione dei differenti oggetti concreti in gruppi generali, il carattere dei legami che vi si stabiliscono, la struttura dell’unità che si costituiscono [...] differiscono profondamente per il tipo e la modalità di azione dal pensiero per concetti [...] (151)». Ciò significa che le generalizzazioni effettuate mediante il pensiero per complessi vanno a creare, per la loro struttura, dei veri e propri complessi di oggetti concreti isolati, riuniti sulla base dei soli legami soggettivi che si stabiliscono nell’impressione del bambino; alla base del complesso infatti vi sono i legami più svariati, che spesso hanno poco in comune tra di loro e che sono di tipo fattuale, casuale e concreto. «Ogni elemento del complesso può essere legato al tutto, espresso nel complesso, e agli elementi isolati che lo compongono mediante legami isolati più diversi (153-154)». Inoltre, «nel complesso, a differenza del concetto, non vi sono legami gerarchici e relazioni gerarchiche tra i tratti (158)» degli oggetti, né rapporti di generalità (vedi). Vygotskij fa notare che «i complessi infantili, corrispondenti ai significati (vedi) delle parole, non si sviluppano liberamente, spontaneamente, secondo linee tracciate dal bambino stesso, ma secondo direzioni precise che sono indicate per lo sviluppo del complesso dal significato delle parole, già stabilito nel linguaggio degli adulti (162)». In ogni caso, il complesso infantile coincide con il concetto dell’adulto nel riferimento all’oggetto, ossia, il bambino e l’adulto si intendono perfettamente nel riferirsi ad un determinato oggetto, ma il bambino lo fa attraverso il meccanismo interno del complesso disorganico e basato sulla concretezza, mentre l’adulto lo fa sulla base del processo interno organizzato tipico del concetto. È necessario sottolineare che una volta superato il complesso con la comparsa del concetto, questo non soppianta completamente il complesso. Esso, infatti, rimane nella mente del soggetto e opera quotidianamente nella sfera del pensiero puramente concreto e nelle forme più primitive del pensiero umano come quelle che sono presenti nel sogno; qui domina ancora il meccanismo primitivo del pensiero per complessi che si manifesta attraverso il processo «della fusione concreta, della condensazione e

13

dello spostamento (182)», nonché della sovrapposizione di immagini e della partecipazione (vedi).

COMPLESSO ASSOCIATIVO [associative complex] [complejo asociativo]

Primo tipo di complesso (vedi) caratterizzato dal legame puramente associativo tra gli oggetti appartenenti al gruppo. Il bambino costruisce il complesso attraverso l’inclusione nel gruppo degli oggetti più svariati sulla base di qualunque rapporto concreto, qualunque legame associativo tra gli oggetti, quali il colore, la forma, la dimensione o altri tratti distintivi che il bambino individua. Vygotskij spiega che «dire una parola per il bambino in questo periodo significa indicare il nome della famiglia delle cose, legate tra di loro in una parentela per le linee più diverse (155)». Non solo gli elementi sono inclusi nella stessa famiglia secondo l’associazione dei più svariati tratti caratterizzanti, ma anche in base a differenti caratteri del rapporto tra gli oggetti. Ne risulta quindi un complesso estremamente eterogeneo, vario e poco sistematizzato. Inoltre, come testimonia Vygotskij, «alla base di questa massa ci può essere non solo un’identità immediata dei tratti, ma anche la loro somiglianza o il loro contrasto [...] (154)»; vi è sempre e comunque un legame concreto. Il bambino dunque chiamerà con lo stesso nome tutta una serie di oggetti che oggettivamente possono non avere nulla in comune tra loro, ma per cui il bambino ha stabilito più legami singoli e di vario genere sulla base della sua personale percezione di fatto della realtà. Il bambino, seguendo la logica di questo tipo di complesso, potrebbe ad esempio riferirsi con la parola «acqua» all’acqua, al latte che è liquido come l’acqua, al bicchiere, che contiene l’acqua, al vetro, che è trasparente come l’acqua, al bagno che gli viene fatto dalla madre con l’acqua, e via dicendo.

14

COMPLESSO A CATENA [chain complex] [complejo cadena]

Il complesso a catena «si costituisce secondo il principio della riunione dinamica e temporanea di mattoni isolati in una catena unica e del trasferimento di significato tra i mattoni di questa catena (157)»; in questo modo, nel processo di formazione di tale complesso (vedi) vi è sempre un passaggio in sequenza da un tratto all’altro a cui corrisponde uno slittamento di significato lungo gli anelli della catena, rappresentanti le parole. Ogni anello risulta essere collegato al precedente per un tratto che differisce completamente dal tratto che caratterizza l’unione con l’anello successivo. Anche in questo caso il legame tra gli oggetti che costituiscono tale complesso è di tipo associativo. Vygotskij riporta nella sua opera vari esempi di esperimenti in cui il bambino manifesta chiaramente la formazione di un complesso a catena. In uno di questi «il bambino indica con la parola «qua» dapprima un’anatra che nuota in uno stagno, poi ogni liquido, compreso il latte che beve nel suo biberon. Poi quando un giorno vede su una moneta la raffigurazione di un’aquila, indica anche la moneta con questo nome e ciò è sufficiente perché in seguito tutti gli oggetti tondi, che ricordano una moneta, siano indicati con lo stesso nome (171-172)».

COMPLESSO COLLEZIONE [collection] [colección]

Vygotskij spiega che nella collezione «[...] oggetti concreti differenti sono riuniti in base alla loro mutua complementarietà rispetto ad un qualsiasi tratto distintivo e formano un tutto unico, composto da parti eterogenee che si completano reciprocamente l’una con l’altra (155)»; in questo tipo di complesso (vedi), quindi, agiscono delle associazioni per contrasto. Inoltre, «il complesso collezione è una generalizzazione (vedi) delle cose sulla base della loro partecipazione ad un’unica operazione pratica, sulla base della loro collaborazione funzionale (156)». Questo tipo di complesso ha delle radici molto profonde nella concretezza, nell’intuito e nella pratica del bambino, elementi che costituiscono quasi totalmente il suo pensiero fino a

15

questo momento e, essendo la forma più frequente di generalizzazione delle esperienze concrete, permane nella psiche del bambino molto a lungo. Anche questo complesso non viene soppiantato completamente dalla comparsa del pensiero per concetti e rimane presente ad esempio «[...] nel linguaggio concreto, quando l’adulto parla delle stoviglie o dei vestiti, [e] ha in vista non tanto il concetto astratto corrispondente quanto degli assortimenti di cose concrete, formanti una collezione (156)».

COMPLESSO DIFFUSO [diffuse complex] [complejo difundido]

Il complesso diffuso costituisce il quarto tipo di complesso (vedi) e si caratterizza per il fatto che il singolo tratto distintivo che sta alla base della riunione dei vari oggetti concreti facenti parte del complesso si presenta, appunto, come diffuso, nonché fluido e vago; ne consegue dunque la formazione di un complesso con elementi legati tra loro in maniera imprecisa e sfumata. Gli esperimenti condotti da Vygotskij sul complesso diffuso mostrano come «il bambino assegna ad un dato modello, un triangolo giallo, non solo dei triangoli, ma anche dei trapezi, poiché gli ricordano dei triangoli con il vertice tagliato. Poi ai trapezi sono vicini i quadrati, ai quadrati gli esagoni, agli esagoni le semicirconferenze e poi i cerchi [...]. [Il bambino fa rientrare nel gruppo anche figure che si avvicinano per il colore]; allora [...] assegna agli oggetti gialli degli oggetti verdi, ai verdi dei blu, ai blu dei neri (159)». Anche questo tipo di complesso, come il complesso collezione (vedi), persiste a lungo nella mente del bambino e presenta un tratto nuovo che caratterizza il pensiero per complessi, ovvero l’imprecisione dei suoi contorni e la sua illimitatezza di principio. Questo complesso, inoltre, compare quando il bambino inizia a scostarsi leggermente dal mondo della pura concretezza per avvicinarsi al mondo dell’immaginazione. Quindi, lo vediamo correre con la fantasia realizzando accostamenti di oggetti sfumati e oscillanti, sorprendenti per i risultati inattesi che spesso risultano incomprensibili per gli adulti. Volendo spaziare verso campi diversi dalla psicologia,

16

vediamo anche un esempio di questo tipo di pensiero creativo e fantastico nella letteratura inglese della seconda metà dell’Ottocento con Lewis Carroll, che nel suo libro Alice nel Paese delle Meraviglie istituisce per Alice, la bambina protagonista del romanzo, un mondo assolutamente irreale fondato proprio sul volo che si può compiere solo attraverso l’immaginazione e la fantasia, mondo in cui la bambina si lascia scivolare per le vie del ragionamento basato su associazioni di idee e immagini totalmente libere e sfumate che ricordano proprio il complesso diffuso.

CONCETTO [concept] [concepto]

Il concetto costituisce il livello superiore di generalizzazione (vedi) seguente il concetto potenziale (vedi); è dato dalla riunione di tratti distintivi comuni di determinati oggetti sotto un unico nome, in cui sussistono legami tra i tratti unici, precisi, regolari e sistematizzati. Vygotskij afferma in merito che «[il concetto è] caratterizzato dall’uniformità dei legami che sono alla sua base. Ciò significa che ogni oggetto isolato, implicato in un concetto generalizzato, è incluso in questa generalizzazione secondo un fondamento assolutamente identico a quello di tutti gli altri oggetti (153)», e non sulla base di tratti costituiti da impressioni soggettive, empiriche e diverse le une dalle altre, come succede nel caso del complesso (vedi).

CONCETTO POTENZIALE [potential concept] [concepto potencial]

Il concetto potenziale costituisce il terzo livello di generalizzazione (vedi) precedente il concetto; è dunque l’anello di congiunzione tra lo pseudoconcetto (vedi), rientrante nella categoria del complesso (vedi), e il concetto (vedi) vero e proprio. A differenza di come succede per il complesso, «il bambino che si trova in questa fase del suo sviluppo distingue solitamente un gruppo di oggetti da lui riuniti sulla base di un unico tratto comune (186)» e questo fa somigliare il concetto potenziale al concetto; tuttavia, è solo «un significato concreto e

17

funzionale [...] [a formare la] base psichica del concetto potenziale (188)» e non un processo intellettivo e logico. Infatti, il concetto potenziale viene considerato, più che il risultato di un’operazione mentale di astrazione (vedi), una formazione pre-intellettiva costituita da «un’impressione d’insieme analoga a quella che abbiamo avuto precedentemente (Groos, citato in Vygotskij 2003: 186)», «una disposizione ad una reazione comune (187)».

CONCETTO QUOTIDIANO [everyday concept] [concepto cotidiano]

I concetti quotidiani sono il prodotto dell’apprendimento (vedi) prescolastico e sono caratterizzati da un uso da parte del bambino spontaneo, automatico e del tutto corretto, anche se incosciente e involontario. Vygotskij scrive che «[...] l’indagine sui concetti spontanei e non spontanei è un caso particolare dell’indagine più generale del problema dell’apprendimento (vedi) e dello sviluppo [...] (vedi) (244)», nel senso che i concetti spontanei sono indicatori del grado di sviluppo mentale del bambino, sul quale si innesta il processo di apprendimento a scuola dei concetti non spontanei, cioè dei concetti scientifici (vedi), i quali, a loro volta, esercitano un’influenza costruttiva sui primi. Vygotskij spiega in merito che si verifica «un innalzamento del livello dei concetti quotidiani che si riorganizzano sotto l’influenza del fatto che il bambino padroneggia i concetti scientifici [...] (283)», responsabili della comparsa nel bambino della presa di coscienza (vedi); il bambino trasferisce questa funzione ai concetti quotidiani, i quali vengono sistematizzati, acquistando tutta una serie di nuovi rapporti con gli altri concetti e modificando così il loro rapporto con l’oggetto. Vygotskij spiega quindi che «i concetti spontanei del bambino si sviluppano dal basso verso l’alto, dalle proprietà più elementari e inferiori a quelle superiori (286)»; «[essi infatti] sono forti nella sfera dell’applicazione concreta, spontanea, con un senso dato dalla situazione, nella sfera dell’esperienza e dell’empirismo [...]. [Proprio da qui comincia il loro sviluppo che] [...] si muove verso le proprietà superiori dei concetti: la presa di coscienza e la volontarietà (288)»,

18

funzioni che compaiono grazie all’apprendimento dei concetti scientifici nella zona di sviluppo prossimo (vedi).

CONCETTO SCIENTIFICO [scientific concept] [concepto científico]

I concetti scientifici si formano durante il processo di apprendimento (vedi) e la loro assimilazione si basa sull’esistenza di concetti quotidiani (vedi) già elaborati. Vygotskij spiega che «[...] i concetti scientifici si sviluppano dall’alto verso il basso, dalle proprietà più complesse e superiori a quelle più elementari e inferiori (286)»; più precisamente, «la forza dei concetti scientifici si manifesta nella sfera che è interamente definita dalla proprietà superiore dei concetti: la presa di coscienza (vedi) e la volontarietà. [...] Lo sviluppo dei concetti scientifici comincia [proprio da questa sfera] [...] e prosegue in avanti, germinando verso il basso nella sfera dell’esperienza personale e del concreto (288)», regno dei concetti quotidiani, sui quali, appunto, prende piede l’apprendimento dei concetti scientifici. Vygotskij afferma in merito che «la dipendenza dei concetti scientifici da quelli spontanei e a sua volta la loro influenza su quelli spontanei derivano da un rapporto particolare del concetto scientifico con l’oggetto, che, [...], è caratterizzato dal fatto che è mediato da un altro concetto e quindi racchiude in sé allo stesso tempo, oltre alla relazione con l’oggetto, anche la relazione con l’altro concetto, cioè i primi elementi di un sistema di concetti (242)»; il concetto quotidiano fa quindi da intermediario tra il concetto scientifico e il suo oggetto, creando così una rete di concetti. È importante sottolineare che «i concetti scientifici sono le porte attraverso cui la presa di coscienza entra nel regno dei concetti infantili (243)»; da questa funzione scaturisce poi la volontarietà, che insieme alla prima funzione, va ad investire la sfera dei concetti spontanei, ristrutturandola ed elevandola alla padronanza. Vygotskij scrive infatti che «la disciplina formale di questi concetti scientifici si manifesta nella riorganizzazione di tutta la sfera dei

19

concetti spontanei del bambino. In ciò sta la loro grande importanza per la storia dello sviluppo mentale (vedi) del bambino (314)».

CONCETTO SPONTANEO [spontaneous concept] [concepto espontáneo] Vedi CONCETTO QUOTIDIANO

CONDENSAZIONE [condensation] [condensación]
Vedi COMPLESSO, GENERALIZZAZIONE, LINGUAGGIO EGOCENTRICO

ENDOFASIA [endophasy] [endofasia] Vedi LINGUAGGIO INTERNO

EQUIVALENZA DEI CONCETTI [equivalence of concepts] [equivalencia de conceptos]

Si tratta di una legge secondo la quale «ogni concetto (vedi) può essere designato [non solo attraverso se stesso ma anche] secondo una quantità infinita di modi mediante altri concetti (299)»; è necessario precisare che questa legge è diversa e specifica per ogni stadio di sviluppo della generalizzazione (vedi).

FASE AFFETTIVO-VOLITIVA [affective- volitional phase] [fase afectiva / volitiva] Vedi LINGUAGGIO

FASE EMOZIONALE [emotional phase] [fase emocional] Vedi LINGUAGGIO

20

FASE PRE-INTELLETTIVA [pre-intellective phase] [fase pre-intelectiva] Vedi LINGUAGGIO

FUSIONE CONCRETA [concrete fusion] [fusión concreta] Vedi COMPLESSO

GENERALITÀ [generality] [generalidad]

Per generalità si intende il tipo di relazione che struttura i concetti (vedi) in un sistema secondo un ordine genetico dal più generale al più particolare e vice versa; un esempio che propone Vygotskij è la relazione tra le parole di uguale grado di generalità «sedia, tavolo, armadio, divano, scansia (297)» e la parola «mobile (297)», di generalità superiore. Vygotskij afferma che «le relazioni di generalità tra i concetti sono legate alla struttura di generalizzazione (vedi) [...] e che inoltre sono legate ad essa nel modo più stretto: ad ogni struttura di generalizzazione [...] corrisponde il suo sistema specifico di generalità e di rapporti di generalizzazione tra i concetti generali e particolari [...] (297)». Vygotskij aggiunge poi che dai rapporti di generalità dipende la cosiddetta equivalenza dei concetti (vedi). Vygotskij spiega infine che «in funzione dello sviluppo dei rapporti di generalità aumenta l’indipendenza del concetto dalla parola, del senso della sua espressione ed appare la sempre più grande libertà delle operazioni di senso rispetto a se stesse e alle loro espressioni verbali (302)»; ne consegue che «l’insufficiente concatenazione del pensiero infantile è l’espressione diretta dello sviluppo insufficiente delle relazioni di generalità tra concetti (312)».

21

GENERALIZZAZIONE [generalization] [generalización]

«La generalizzazione avviene tramite una sorta di catena percezione -> parola -> percezione -> parola ecc. (ossia analisi -> sintesi -> analisi -> sintesi ecc.) tramite la quale nuove percezioni inducono a formulare nuove parole per descriverle e ciò spinge a catalogare le percezioni affinché sia possibile, con un numero di parole finito, esprimere percezioni infinite, dato che non esistono due percezioni identiche (Vygotskij, citato in Osimo 2004:1)»; si tratta dunque di una sorta di processo di condensazione mediante il quale a tutta la realtà viene assegnato un sostituto simbolico appartenente ad una classe data, «implicitamente accettata dalla comunità dei parlanti come un’entità unitaria (Sapir, citato in Vygotskij 2003: 16)», che serve nella relazione sociale per trasmettere ad altri un’esperienza. La generalizzazione, intesa appunto come raggruppamento di oggetti singoli in un unico gruppo, avviene, a seconda dell’età del soggetto, a diversi livelli, che sono sincretismo (vedi), complesso (vedi), concetto potenziale (vedi) e concetto (vedi). Vygotskij spiega in merito che «un nuovo stadio di generalizzazione compare solo sulla base del precedente. Una nuova struttura di generalizzazione [...] compare come una generalizzazione delle generalizzazioni e non semplicemente come un modo nuovo di generalizzazione di oggetti singoli. Il lavoro precedente del pensiero, che si manifesta nelle generalizzazioni dominanti nello stadio precedente, non è annullato e perduto, ma si inserisce ed entra come premessa necessaria per il nuovo lavoro del pensiero (303)»; una volta formata la nuova struttura di generalizzazione dapprima solo con alcuni concetti, il bambino trasferisce il nuovo principio agli altri concetti, riorganizzando la struttura di tutti i concetti precedenti. Riguardo alla generalizzazione come processo su cui si basa la formazione di un concetto, Vygotskij scrive che «[...] la generalizzazione di un concetto comporta la localizzazione di un dato concetto in un sistema determinato di rapporti, che sono i legami più fondamentali, più naturali, più importanti tra i concetti. La generalizzazione significa così [...] la sistemazione dei concetti (241)». Inoltre, come afferma Vygotskij, essa «[...] presuppone [...] non un

22

impoverimento, ma un arricchimento della realtà rappresentata nel concetto rispetto alla percezione e all’intuizione sensibili e immediate di questa realtà (295)».

IDIOMATICITÀ [idiomaticity] [idiomaticidad] Vedi LINGUAGGIO INTERNO

INFLUENZA DEL SENSO [influx of sense] [influjo de sentido] Vedi LINGUAGGIO INTERNO

INTROSPEZIONE [introspection] [introspección] Vedi PRESA DI COSCIENZA

LEGAME ASSOCIATIVO [associative bond] [vínculo asociativo]
V edi ASTRAZIONE, COMPLESSO ASSOCIA TIVO, COMPLESSO A CA TENA,

SVILUPPO

LINGUA [language] [lengua]

La lingua comprende tutto un insieme di fenomeni sonori e intellettivi, esterni e interni, orali e scritti, grammaticali e semantici, che permettono ad un individuo di esprimere, comunicare, raccontare, agli altri e a se stessi, pensieri e sentimenti, seguendo le maniere e gli scopi più svariati. Dunque, «la lingua, dal punto di vista del linguista, non è un’unica funzione verbale, ma un insieme di forme verbali diverse (369)» che presentano, a seconda del fine e della situazione d’impiego, dal discorso quotidiano al linguaggio dell’opera letteraria, modalità

23

d’espressione radicalmente differenti. Vygotskij riporta un esempio sulla differenza fra linguaggio in prosa e linguaggio in poesia e afferma che «la lingua, nell’una e nell’altra forma, ha le sue particolarità nella scelta delle espressioni, nell’impiego di forme grammaticali e nelle procedure sintattiche di accoppiamento delle parole nel linguaggio (370)».

Vygotskij, riprendendo un esperimento sulla lingua e il suo sviluppo nel bambino effettuato dallo studioso W. Stern e confermandone la validità, spiega che è all’incirca all’età di due anni che «nel bambino si sveglia una prima coscienza del significato della lingua e la volontà di conquistarlo. Il bambino a questo punto fa la più grande scoperta della sua vita. Scopre che ogni cosa ha un nome (111)». Il bambino si appropria della lingua attraverso il rapporto con il mondo degli adulti, in particolar modo attraverso il rapporto fin dai primissimi mesi di vita con la madre. «In questa fondamentale prima relazione madre-bambino, gioca un ruolo importante l’imitazione reciproca, ad iniziare dallo svilupparsi del linguaggio, in cui la madre imita il bambino, ma sempre un passo più avanti di lui dal punto di vista semantico e sintattico. [...] Come osserva Vygotskij, diventiamo noi stessi attraverso gli altri: quindi non conosciamo gli altri attraverso l’empatia, bensì nella socializzazione primaria, in cui il bambino impara a conoscere l’altro e come l’altro lo interpreta, e in tal modo apprende a conoscersi. Perciò il linguaggio è anche uno strumento di comunicazione fra l’uomo e se stesso (Carnaroli 2001: 2)». Da qui l’importanza di quello che Vygotskij denomina linguaggio interno (vedi).

La lingua diventa poi un importante mezzo funzionale su cui si innestano, il primo trainato dal secondo, il processo di sviluppo (vedi) e di apprendimento (vedi) del soggetto; infatti, si osserva che «la contribución del aprendizaje consiste en que pone a disposición del individuo un poderoso instrumento: la lengua. En el proceso de adquisición, este instrumento se convierte en parte integrante de las estructuras psíquicas del individuo (Ivić1994: 4)».

24

LINGUA MATERNA [native language] [lengua materna]

La lingua materna costituisce il primo apparato linguistico che il bambino apprende direttamente dal rapporto con la madre e con il mondo esterno. Vygotskij spiega che «lo sviluppo della lingua materna comincia con l’uso libero e spontaneo del linguaggio e si compie con la presa di coscienza (vedi) delle forme verbali e la loro padronanza (291)», processo esattamente opposto a quello di apprendimento di una lingua straniera (vedi). Con questa vi è una strettissima interdipendenza in quanto «l’assimilazione di una lingua straniera apre la strada alla padronanza delle sfere superiori della lingua materna (291)»; Vygotskij procede precisando che «[...] la padronanza di una lingua straniera innalza anche la lingua materna ad uno stadio superiore, nel senso della presa di coscienza delle forme della lingua, della generalizzazione dei fenomeni della lingua, dell’uso più consapevole e più volontario della parola come strumento del pensiero e come espressione del concetto (220-221)». Vygotskij conclude la sua analisi affermando un paragone tra l’apprendimento della lingua materna e l’apprendimento nel periodo prescolare dei concetti quotidiani (vedi); il bambino infatti assimila questi in maniera inconsapevole, libera e spontanea, così come avviene con la lingua madre.

LINGUA STRANIERA [foreign language] [lengua extranjera]

La lingua straniera significa per il bambino l’assimilazione dei corrispondenti di quei significati già acquisiti attraverso il processo di astrazione (vedi) e generalizzazione (vedi) nella lingua materna (vedi) in un altro codice linguistico; lo studioso russo mette in luce infatti come «l’apprendimento da parte dello scolaro di una lingua straniera si basa in qualche modo sulla conoscenza della lingua materna (220)», nel senso che «il bambino assimila una lingua straniera perché dispone già di un sistema di conoscenze nella lingua materna e lo trasferisce nella sfera dell’altra lingua (291)». Una volta comparso il processo di appropriazione volontaria della propria lingua e delle regole che la disciplinano, nel bambino l’apprendimento di una lingua

25

straniera parte proprio da questo punto; come spiega Vygotskij, «lo sviluppo della lingua straniera inizia con la presa di coscienza (vedi) della lingua e il suo uso volontario e si compie con un linguaggio libero e spontaneo (291)». Di conseguenza si può affermare che «l’assimilazione della lingua straniera segue una via direttamente opposta a quella che percorre lo sviluppo della lingua materna; [...] lo sviluppo della lingua materna va dal basso verso l’alto, mentre lo sviluppo della lingua straniera va dall’alto in basso (289-290)»; il primo si muove dalla spontaneità e dalla libertà alla presa di coscienza della regola, il secondo dalla regola e dalla consapevolezza all’uso spontaneo, così come succede per l’apprendimento dei concetti scientifici (vedi).

LINGUAGGIO [language] [lenguaje]

Vygotskij scrive che il «linguaggio è anzitutto il mezzo di relazione sociale, il mezzo di espressione e comprensione (15)»; in seguito, precisa che «la funzione iniziale del linguaggio è la funzione della comunicazione, del legame sociale, dell’azione su coloro che sono attorno, sia dalla parte degli adulti, che dalla parte del bambino. Così il primo linguaggio è puramente sociale [...] (57)». Vi è dapprima una fase emozionale, affettivo-volitiva del linguaggio, in cui il bambino esprime i sui bisogni e le sue sensazioni prettamente attraverso il pianto; segue poi una fase pre-intellettiva, in cui il grido, il balbettio e le prime parole costituiscono per il bambino il mezzo con cui comunica con il mondo esterno. Il linguaggio diviene infine linguaggio intellettivo (vedi) quando la sua linea di sviluppo si interseca, all’incirca all’età di due anni, con quella dello sviluppo del pensiero; a partire da questo momento il linguaggio inizia ad assumere una funzione simbolica, ovvero, inizia a presentare suoni di senso (vedi) compiuto, andando ad indicare determinati oggetti e facendosi portatore di significati (vedi). A questo punto attraverso il linguaggio il bambino assimila la rappresentazione del mondo.

26

Vygotskij spiega che «al primo stadio del linguaggio infantile autonomo non esistono nuove relazioni di generalità (vedi) tra i concetti (vedi), per cui tra di essi sono possibili solo i legami che possono essere stabiliti nella percezione (309)». Inoltre, «[...] nel campo dello sviluppo del linguaggio, l’assimilazione delle forme e delle strutture grammaticali avviene nel bambino prima dell’assimilazione delle strutture e delle operazioni logiche che corrispondono a queste forme (117)»; in seguito, l’apprendimento delle regole della lingua, in particolar modo della grammatica e della scrittura, danno al bambino la possibilità di accedere ad un livello superiore dello sviluppo del linguaggio, prendendo coscienza (vedi) della lingua, acquistando la capacità di astrazione (vedi) e generalizzazione (vedi) dei concetti e diventando di conseguenza sempre più consapevole e abile nell’uso del linguaggio stesso.

Lo sviluppo del linguaggio non corre soltanto lungo la linea della presa di coscienza della lingua come mezzo di comunicazione e della formazione progressiva di un sistema di concetti, ma anche lungo la linea della presa di coscienza della presenza di due piani del linguaggio, uno interno e uno esterno. Vygotskij testimonia ciò riportando i risultati della sua analisi in merito. «La ricerca mostra che l’aspetto interno, dotato di senso, semantico del linguaggio e l’aspetto esterno, sonoro, fasico, pur formando un’unità autentica, hanno ciascuno delle proprie leggi di movimento. L’unità del linguaggio è un’unità complessa, ma non omogenea e congenere [...]. L’aspetto semantico della parola nel suo sviluppo va dal tutto alla parte, dalla frase alla parola, mentre l’aspetto esteriore del linguaggio va dalla parte al tutto, dalla parola alla frase (335)». Il bambino inizialmente non è consapevole di tale divisione; «una delle linee più importanti dello sviluppo del linguaggio nel bambino consiste appunto nel fatto che questa unità comincia a differenziarsi e si comincia a prenderne coscienza (342)».

LINGUAGGIO AFASICO [aphasic speech] [lenguaje afásico] Vedi LINGUAGGIO INTERNO

27

LINGUAGGIO EGOCENTRICO [egocentric speech] [lenguaje egocéntrico]

Il linguaggio egocentrico è un linguaggio per sé ad alta voce che assume per il bambino le funzioni di comprensione del sé, contatto, guida e organizzazione; essendo privo di destinatario esterno, risulta incomprensibile se non si conosce la situazione in cui nasce. È caratterizzato da frammentarietà, abbreviazione e tendenza alla predicatività, ovvero nel discorso vi è un’omissione del soggetto a favore del predicato e delle parole ad esso legato. Vygotskij afferma che «il linguaggio egocentrico del bambino è uno dei fenomeni del passaggio dalle funzioni interpsichiche a quelle intrapsichiche, cioè dalle forme di attività sociale, collettiva del bambino alle sue funzioni individuali. [...] Il linguaggio per se stessi nasce dalla differenziazione della funzione inizialmente sociale del linguaggio per gli altri. Si tratta dunque di [...] una individualizzazione progressiva, nata sulla base della socialità interna del bambino (350)». Secondo Vygotskij, «studiare il linguaggio egocentrico del bambino è importante perché è l’embrione del linguaggio interno (vedi) dell’adulto (Osimo 2004: 1)»; infatti, la sequenza evolutiva tracciata da Vygotskij parte dal linguaggio sociale, passa attraverso l’egocentrismo, per poi raggiungere il linguaggio interno. «Il linguaggio egocentrico è un linguaggio interno per la sua funzione psichica e un linguaggio esterno per la sua struttura (351)» e il suo sviluppo è costituito da una curva crescente per quanto riguarda la sua funzione psichica e una curva decrescente per quanto riguarda la sua struttura, ovvero la vocalizzazione. Ne consegue necessariamente che «[...] il linguaggio egocentrico si sviluppa in direzione del linguaggio interno, e tutto il suo sviluppo non può essere compreso che come il corso di un’acquisizione progressiva di tutte le proprietà distintive del linguaggio interno (356)», in primis «[...] l’astrazione (vedi) dal lato sonoro e la tendenza sempre più grande all’abbreviazione, all’attenuazione dell’articolazione sintattica, alla condensazione (377)».

28

LINGUAGGIO ESTERNO [external speech] [lenguaje exterior / externo]

Vygotskij definisce il linguaggio esterno come «un processo di trasformazione del pensiero nella parola, la sua materializzazione e oggettivazione (347)» attraverso la vocalizzazione. Il linguaggio esterno è dunque orale, meglio ancora fasico, cioè dotato di suono, e compare prima di tutte le altre forme di linguaggio, in modo spontaneo e inconsapevole come del resto tutti i concetti quotidiani del bambino. Ha la funzione di comunicare con l’esterno, ha dunque un destinatario ed è per questo comprensibile agli altri. Nella maggior parte dei casi il linguaggio esterno è dialogico e questo presuppone la velocità. Vygotskij afferma in merito che «la rapidità dell’atto del linguaggio presuppone una sua esecuzione del tipo di un atto volontario semplice ed inoltre con elementi abituali [...]; la comunicazione dialogica implica enunciati di getto e come viene viene. Il dialogo è un linguaggio fatto di repliche, è un linguaggio di reazioni (373)». È importante precisare che il linguaggio esterno deve essere «[...] contestualizzato rispetto agli stati della mente di chi parla, riferendosi a stati della mente personali, cioè a sentimenti, credenze e pensieri che, proprio tramite la parola, colui che parla intende trasferire e riprodurre nella mente di colui che ascolta. Quindi, [...] perché l’atto linguistico sia efficace, i dialoganti devono avere un’esperienza di attenzione condivisa, anche riguardo all’uso convenzionale delle parole in riferimento ai propri stati interni: quindi con un processo di organizzazione rispetto ad un codice linguistico condiviso (Carnaroli 2001: 1-2)». Di norma il linguaggio esterno è completamente espresso e sintatticamente articolato, ma vi sono circostanze in cui può essere abbreviato. Vygotskij spiega infatti che «se vi è identità di pensieri tra gli interlocutori, un identico orientamento della loro coscienza, il ruolo delle stimolazioni verbali si riduce al minimo (367)». Precisa in seguito che «[...] nel caso in cui sia presente nella mente degli interlocutori un soggetto comune, la comprensione sarà completa con l’aiuto della massima abbreviazione del linguaggio, con una sintassi estremamente semplificata; nel caso contrario non si avrà affatto la comprensione, anche se il linguaggio fosse sviluppato. Così talvolta non solo due sordi non arrivano ad intendersi tra loro, ma anche semplicemente due

29

persone che danno un contenuto differente ad una stessa parola o hanno punti di vista opposti (368)». La tendenza all’abbreviazione nel linguaggio esterno compare anche «[...] quando il parlante esprime il contesto psicologico di ciò che viene enunciato mediante l’intonazione (374)».

LINGUAGGIO FASICO [phasic speech] [lenguaje fásico] Vedi LINGUAGGIO ESTERNO

LINGUAGGIO INTELLETTIVO [intellective speech] [lenguaje intelectivo]

Con questo termine si indica quella porzione di linguaggio che nasce dall’incontro tra pensiero e linguaggio a cui corrisponde il pensiero verbale (vedi). Per citare le parole di Vygotskij, egli afferma che «ad un certo momento (circa due anni), le linee di sviluppo del pensiero e del linguaggio, fino ad allora separate, si intersecano, coincidono nel loro sviluppo e fanno nascere una forma del tutto nuova di comportamento, così caratteristica dell’uomo. [...] Questo momento di svolta, a partire dal quale il linguaggio diventa intellettivo e il pensiero diventa verbale, è caratterizzato da due criteri perfettamente oggettivi e indiscutibili: [...] il primo sta nel fatto che il bambino [...] comincia ad ampliare attivamente il suo vocabolario, [...] il secondo elemento sta nel fatto che [...] la riserva di parole cresce in modo estremamente rapido e a salti (110-111)». Il bambino a questo punto si sforza di possedere il segno che serve a riferirsi ad un determinato oggetto, cioè il suo nome, il quale racchiude in sé un significato; questo fatto sta ad indicare che il bambino smette di considerare il nome meramente come proprietà di un oggetto e che attraverso il pensiero intuisce un legame interno alla parola tra segno e significato. Questo primo atto di pensiero del bambino testimonia il fatto che il suo linguaggio è entrato nella fase intellettiva del suo sviluppo.

30

LINGUAGGIO INTERNO [inner speech] [lenguaje interior / interno]

In un testo di critica su Vygotskij si afferma che nella sua opera Pensiero e linguaggio egli «describe las sutilezas del proceso genético mediante el cual el lenguaje, en calidad de instrumento de las relaciones sociales, se transforma en un instrumento de la organización psíquica interior del niño (la aparición del lenguaje privado, del lenguaje interior, del pensamiento verbal) (Ivić 1999: 4)». Vygotskij introduce l’analisi sul linguaggio interno spiegando che questo «è una formazione particolare per la sua natura psicologica, un tipo particolare di attività verbale, che ha delle caratteristiche assolutamente specifiche e sta in rapporto complesso con gli altri tipi di attività verbale (346)»; prosegue con l’affermazione secondo la quale il linguaggio interno si sviluppa «[...] per la via dell’isolamento funzionale e strutturale dal linguaggio esterno (vedi), per il passaggio da questo al linguaggio egocentrico (vedi) e dal linguaggio egocentrico al linguaggio interno (355)». Si tratta di un linguaggio afasico, ovvero, in esso vi è una totale astrazione (vedi) del linguaggio dal lato sonoro; il bambino, quindi, inizia a pensare la parola, maneggia la sua immagine senza pronunciarla. Il linguaggio interno svolge le stesse funzioni del linguaggio egocentrico, è cioè un linguaggio per sé, distinto dal linguaggio sociale, è la forma più intima di pensiero del bambino che compare nella prima età scolare ed è finalizzata all’adattamento individuale, alla riflessione e all’organizzazione mentale di discorsi sia orali che scritti; costituisce il fondo della coscienza e, non avendo interlocutore, in esso il pensiero viene formulato in termini imprecisi e sfumati in quanto non c’è bisogno di chiarezza per se stessi, l’identico orientamento della coscienza è totale. Il linguaggio interno è abbreviato, ridotto al massimo, stenografico, presenta cortocircuiti, economie e omissioni di ciò che è chiaro al parlante, risultando all’esterno incomprensibile.

In sintesi, le caratteristiche che lo stesso Vygotskij assegna al linguaggio interno sono: sintassi semplificata, predicatività, riduzione ed interiorizzazione dell’aspetto fasico, da cui la denominazione «endofasia», predominanza di senso su significato, influenza dei sensi,

31

agglutinazione delle unità semantiche e idiomaticità. Più nel dettaglio, Vygotskij spiega che «la prima e più importante caratteristica del linguaggio interno è la sua particolarissima sintassi; [...] questa particolarità si manifesta nella frammentarietà apparente, nella discontinuità, nell’abbreviazione del linguaggio interno rispetto a quello esterno (363)». Inoltre, «[...] la predicatività è la forma fondamentale ed unica del linguaggio interno, che dal punto di vista psicologico è costituito tutto dai soli predicati (374)»; ci troviamo dunque di fronte ad una predicatività assoluta per cui il soggetto, in quanto costantemente noto al parlante, viene sottinteso e per questo omesso a favore del predicato. «Il linguaggio interno utilizza preferibilmente l’aspetto semantico e non quello fonetico del linguaggio (379)». Per quanto riguarda l’aspetto fonetico, si assiste ad una riduzione delle parole alle iniziali, mentre considerando l’aspetto semantico, vi è «[...] una predominanza del senso (vedi) della parola sul suo significato (vedi) (380)», essendo il primo più vasto del secondo; non solo, a questa preponderanza del senso sul significato corrisponde anche una predominanza della frase sulla parola e di tutto il contesto sulla frase, rendendo così il linguaggio agglutinato a livello di unità semantiche, dal momento che i sensi e le frasi si riversano gli uni negli altri, e diventando veicolo di un pensiero condensato. Vygotskij afferma che «[...] sembra che la parola assorba in sé il senso delle parole precedenti e successive, allargando quasi senza limiti l’ambito del suo significato. Nel linguaggio interno la parola è molto più carica di senso che in quello esterno (384)»; con una sola denominazione del linguaggio interno possiamo riferirci ad una vastità di pensieri, ragionamenti e sentimenti. Questo sovrapporsi di significati fa sì che si creino nuovi significati, i quali acquistano sfumature diverse e personali, intraducibili nel linguaggio esterno e quindi comprensibili solo per chi li genera; si tratta di veri e propri idiomi.

Si conclude l’analisi affermando che «il linguaggio interno è in misura rilevante un pensiero di puri significati (387)», assolutamente fondamentale per lo studio del pensiero stesso; è infatti un elemento dinamico ed instabile che fa da intermediario nei complessi passaggi tra il pensiero e la parola.

32

LINGUAGGIO ORALE [oral speech] [lenguaje oral] Vedi LINGUAGGIO ESTERNO

LINGUAGGIO SCRITTO [written speech] [lenguaje escrito]

Il linguaggio scritto è un linguaggio monologico di origine intellettuale, espresso attraverso l’uso di segni grafici e caratterizzato, a differenza del linguaggio orale, da consapevolezza, costruzione volontaria e presa di coscienza della struttura fonica, grammaticale, sintattica e semantica del discorso; non costituisce dunque la mera traduzione del linguaggio orale in segni grafici. Un importante tratto caratterizzante di questo linguaggio è l’alto grado di astrazione (vedi) dal suono e dall’interlocutore; si tratta infatti di un linguaggio muto che presenta una notevole distanza dal destinatario. È proprio per via di questa lontananza tra chi scrive e chi legge che tutto deve essere detto nella maniera più espressa possibile e nulla può essere sottointeso. Vygotskij scrive in merito che «nel linguaggio scritto gli interlocutori si trovano in situazioni differenti, il che esclude la possibilità della presenza nei loro pensieri di un soggetto comune (369)». Ecco perché il linguaggio scritto, a differenza di quello orale, presenta sempre la massima articolazione sintattica e non presuppone mai sfumature di senso e idiomaticità, avvalendosi esclusivamente dei significati formali delle parole; Vygotskij afferma infatti che «[...] il linguaggio scritto è la forma di linguaggio più verbosa, più precisa e sviluppata. In esso si deve trasmettere mediante delle parole ciò che nel linguaggio orale è trasmesso mediante l’intonazione e la percezione immediata della situazione (372)»; dunque nel caso del linguaggio scritto, affinché la comprensione sia totale, è necessario l’uso di una quantità maggiore di parole rispetto il linguaggio orale e una combinazione tra di esse il più ricca possibile. Vygotskij prosegue la sua analisi scrivendo che «se il linguaggio esterno viene prima di quello interno, allora quello scritto viene dopo quello interno; [...] il linguaggio scritto è la chiave del linguaggio interno (vedi) (261)», in quanto porta il bambino all’interiorizzazione della lingua.

33

Tuttavia, i due tipi di linguaggio differiscono profondamente per come si presentano: uno è sviluppato ed espresso al massimo, l’altro stenografico e ridotto al minimo.
Vygotskij assegna al linguaggio scritto il merito di far «accedere il bambino al piano astratto più elevato del linguaggio, riorganizzando allo stesso tempo il sistema psichico del linguaggio orale precedentemente formato (258-259)»; il linguaggio scritto conferisce dunque al bambino una maggiore padronanza della lingua.

PAROLA [word] [palabra]

Vedi ASTRAZIONE, GENERALIZZAZIONE, LINGUA, LINGUAGGIO, LINGUAGGIO INTERNO, SEGNO, SENSO, SIGNIFICATO, UNITÀ COMPONENTE, VOLA TILIZZAZIONE

PARTECIPAZIONE [participation] [participación]

Con questo termine ci si riferisce ad una caratteristica tipica del complesso (vedi) che sta ad indicare «la relazione che il pensiero primitivo stabilisce tra due oggetti o due fenomeni considerati sia come parzialmente identici, sia come aventi un’influenza stretta l’uno sull’altro, mentre non esiste tra loro alcun contatto spaziale, né qualche altro legame comprensibile (173)» alla luce del pensiero per concetti.

PENSIERO ARTIFICIALE [artificial thought] [pensamiento artificial] Vedi APPRENDIMENTO

PENSIERO ASTRATTO [abstract thought] [pensamiento abstracto] Vedi ASTRAZIONE, PSEUDOCONCETTO

34

PENSIERO CONCRETO [concrete thought] [pensamiento concreto] Vedi COMPLESSO, PSEUDOCONCETTO

PENSIERO PER COMPLESSI [complex thinking] [pensamiento por complejos] Vedi COMPLESSO

PENSIERO PER CONCETTI [conceptual thinking] [pensamiento por conceptos] Vedi COMPLESSO, CONCETTO, PARTECIPAZIONE, PSEUDOCONCETTO

PENSIERO VERBALE [verbal thought] [pensamiento verbal]

Con questa espressione si definisce quel settore del pensiero che nasce dall’incontro con il linguaggio; a questa porzione di pensiero orientata verso il linguaggio corrisponde poi il linguaggio intellettivo (vedi). Spiega Vygotskij: «la relazione tra pensiero e linguaggio potrebbe essere rappresentata schematicamente in questo caso da due circonferenze che si intersecano, che mostrerebbero che i processi del linguaggio e del pensiero coincidono in parte. Questa è quella che si chiama la sfera del pensiero verbale (118)». Vygotskij riassume poi la sua analisi sul pensiero verbale nel seguente modo: «il pensiero verbale ci è apparso come un insieme dinamico complesso, in cui il rapporto tra pensiero e parola si è manifestato come un movimento attraverso tutta una serie di piani interni, come un passaggio da un piano all’altro. Abbiamo condotto la nostra analisi dal piano più esterno al piano più interno. Nel dramma vivente del pensiero verbale il movimento va in senso inverso: dalla motivazione che fa nascere un pensiero alla formazione di questo stesso pensiero, alla sua mediazione nelle parole del linguaggio interno (vedi), poi nei significati delle parole esterne e infine nelle parole (393)».

35

PERIODO SENSITIVO [sensitive period] [período sensitivo]

Con questo termine, sostituibile anche con l’espressione «zona di sviluppo prossimo» (vedi) si indica precisamente il periodo «in cui l’organismo è particolarmente sensibile a influenze di tipo specifico. In questo periodo, influenze di tipo specifico producono un’azione sensibile su tutto il corso dello sviluppo, producono in esso vari e profondi cambiamenti (275)». Ogni materia scolastica ha il suo periodo sensitivo e in esso l’apprendimento (vedi), perché possa avere un’influenza sul corso dello sviluppo (vedi), deve prendere piede solo nel momento in cui la corrispondente fase di sviluppo è ancora immatura.

PREDICATIVITÀ [predication] [predicatividad]
Vedi LINGUAGGIO EGOCENTRICO, LINGUAGGIO INTERNO

PRESA DI COSCIENZA [to become conscious / aware] [toma de conciencia]

Vygotskij definisce questo termine come «un atto della coscienza, il cui oggetto è l’attività stessa della coscienza (238)»; prendere coscienza significa dunque acquisire consapevolezza di una determinata attività che nasce dall’interno, dalla coscienza, e che normalmente viene svolta automaticamente senza rendersi conto delle leggi che regolano il funzionamento di tale attività. Quindi, «[...] prendere coscienza di un’operazione vuol dire [...] farla passare dal piano dell’azione a quello del linguaggio; vuol dire [...] inventarla di nuovo in immaginazione, per poterla esprimere in parole (Cleparède, citato in Vygotskij 2003: 227)». Prima di tutto, afferma Vygotskij, «per prendere coscienza, bisogna possedere ciò di cui si deve prendere coscienza. Per padroneggiare bisogna disporre di ciò che deve essere sottoposto alla nostra volontà (236)»; ciò significa che la presa di coscienza implica necessariamente la pre-esistenza di una determinata attività della coscienza e una sua fase di funzionamento inconsapevole e involontario; solo queste condizioni permettono poi il passaggio alla consapevolezza nell’uso di tale attività.

36

Vygotskij conferma in seguito la tesi di Piaget secondo la quale «la presa di coscienza segue l’azione e nasce solo quando l’adattamento automatico urta contro delle difficoltà (Piaget, citato in Vygotskij 2003: 75)». È proprio per questo motivo che questa funzione nasce solo nel periodo scolare, quando il bambino per la prima volta si scontra con la soluzione di problemi alla quale può giungere solo attraverso la padronanza delle sue attività psichiche. Inoltre, la presa di coscienza ha una comparsa tardiva in quanto si tratta di una funzione propria di uno stadio superiore dello sviluppo che presuppone l’introspezione, attività che compare ad un livello minimo appunto in età scolare; solo in questo momento nel bambino inizia a svilupparsi la percezione di ciò che accade nella sua psiche, all’interno dei suoi processi psichici, solo ora questi processi vengono generalizzati e portati alla coscienza, permettendone al bambino la progressiva padronanza.

PSEUDOCONCETTO [pseudo-concept] [pseudoconcepto]

Lo pseudoconcetto costituisce l’ultimo tipo di complesso che funge da anello di congiunzione tra il complesso (vedi) e il concetto (vedi) vero e proprio. Viene chiamato in questo modo in quanto «fenotipicamente, cioè per il suo aspetto esterno, [...] coincide completamente con il concetto, ma per la sua natura genetica, per le condizioni della sua apparizione e del suo sviluppo, per i legami causali-dinamici che stanno alla sua base, non è affatto un concetto (161)», rientra ancora nella categoria del complesso. Quindi, il risultato delle operazioni alla base di questo complesso è assolutamente identico al concetto; ciò che differisce da esso sono proprio la dinamica e l’essenza di tali operazioni. Infatti, alla base di un concetto vi sono legami che nascono dal processo di astrazione (vedi), i quali portano l’oggetto dalla sfera inferiore dell’impressione concreta a quella superiore del pensiero astratto, mentre per quanto riguarda il complesso, i legami che uniscono gli oggetti fra loro si fondano sul principio di una semplice associazione nel campo della concretezza. Di conseguenza, si tratta ancora di una forma di

37

pensiero concreto che, tuttavia, ha un ruolo fondamentale sia sotto l’aspetto funzionale che genetico per il raggiungimento del pensiero per concetti e costituisce il tipo di complesso in assoluto più diffuso nell’età scolare del bambino. È necessario precisare che la formazione dello pseudoconcetto nel bambino viene influenzata dalla relazione verbale con gli adulti che lo circondano in quanto questo fenomeno corrisponde per il bambino al processo di attribuzione di un significato (vedi), il quale avviene proprio attraverso l’appropriazione del linguaggio degli adulti; per questo motivo, ne consegue che questa ultima forma di complesso, orientata e guidata nel suo sviluppo dalla forza motrice della lingua degli adulti, sfocerà nella comparsa del pensiero per concetti, tipico del pensiero adulto. Gli pseudoconcetti vanno quindi considerati come gli equivalenti funzionali dei concetti, i quali prenderanno vita, appunto, a partire da queste formazioni precedenti. È proprio questa somiglianza esterna tra lo pseudoconcetto e il concetto che permette a questo punto dello sviluppo del pensiero infantile la completa comprensione tra bambino e adulto nel riferimento all’oggetto. Vygotskij conclude affermando che «gli pseudoconcetti non sono un patrimonio esclusivo del bambino. Nella nostra vita quotidiana il pensiero opera molto spesso per pseudoconcetti. [A volte i concetti con cui ragioniamo] non sono concetti nel vero senso della parola. Sono piuttosto delle rappresentazioni generali delle cose (183)».

RIFERIMENTO ALL’OGGETTO [referent] [referencia al objeto] Vedi ASTRAZIONE, COMPLESSO, PSEUDOCONCETTO

SEGNO [sign] [signo]

Il segno è l’elemento attraverso cui avviene la comunicazione; nel caso della comunicazione verbale, quindi del linguaggio, il segno si identifica nella parola, la quale serve appunto per indicare un oggetto tramite il suo nome. Il segno, che riunisce in sé il suono e il significato della

38

parola, diventa il simbolo dell’oggetto designato all’interno dell’atto comunicativo; esso dunque veicola la funzione simbolica del linguaggio. L’uso funzionale del segno distingue le forme psichiche superiori dell’uomo; Vygotskij afferma che «[...] tutte le funzioni psichiche superiori sono unite [...] dall’uso del segno come mezzo fondamentale di direzione e padronanza dei processi psichici (137)». Questo è ciò che succede anche con la parola nel linguaggio: qui essa viene usata, oltre che esternamente come mezzo della comunicazione, anche come mezzo per orientare il pensiero all’interno dei processi intellettivi. Inizialmente però «la parola entra nella struttura delle cose senza avere però il significato funzionale di segno. [...] Per un certo tempo [la parola] è per il bambino una proprietà della cosa a fianco delle sue altre proprietà (123)»; solo in un secondo tempo, quando avviene la presa di coscienza (vedi) della parola come portatrice di un significato interno (vedi), essa comincia ad essere usata come segno strumentale.

SENSO [sense] [sentido]

Il senso è principalmente l’elemento che, abbinato al suono, rende tale suono parte del linguaggio umano. Vygotskij definisce il senso sottolineando le differenze con il significato (vedi) delle parole: «il senso della parola [...] rappresenta l’insieme di tutti i fatti psicologici che compaiono nella nostra coscienza grazie alla parola. Il senso di una parola è così una formazione sempre dinamica, fluttuante, complessa che ha parecchie zone di stabilità differenti, [costituite dai singoli significati] (380)». Continua Vygotskij: «Il senso di una parola, [a differenza del suo significato], è un fenomeno [...] mobile, che in una certa misura cambia costantemente secondo le varie coscienze e, per una stessa coscienza, secondo le circostanze. A questo riguardo il senso di una parola è inesauribile. [...] [Inoltre,] il senso può essere staccato dalla parola che lo esprime, come può essere fissato facilmente a qualsiasi altra parola. [...] Perciò accade che una parola prenda il posto di un’altra. Il senso si stacca dalla parola e così si

39

conserva. Ma se la parola può sussistere senza il senso, il senso può nella stessa misura sussistere senza la parola (381)».

SIGNIFICATO [meaning] [significado]

Il significato è la parte più interna della parola che costituisce l’unità componente (vedi) del pensiero verbale (vedi) in quanto è l’elemento che racchiude in sé sia un atto di pensiero, la semantica della parola, sia un atto verbale, la sonorità della parola; il significato dunque media internamente il pensiero nella sua espressione verbale, così come il segno (vedi) lo media esternamente. Vygotskij afferma che «il fatto nuovo ed essenziale che presenta questa ricerca sullo studio del pensiero e del linguaggio è che i significati della parola si sviluppano (326)». Spiega Vygotskij più in particolare: «il significato delle parole non è costante. Si modifica nel corso dello sviluppo del bambino. Varia secondo i diversi modi di funzionamento del pensiero. Rappresenta una formazione più dinamica che statica. È stato possibile stabilire la variabilità dei significati solo quando è stata definita correttamente la natura del significato stesso. La sua natura si manifesta anzitutto nella generalizzazione (vedi), che è contenuta come elemento fondamentale e centrale in ogni parola, perché ogni parola già generalizza. (333)». Nel suo sviluppo e mutamento, il significato resta comunque una formazione più costante rispetto al senso (vedi). Vygotskij afferma infatti che «il significato è [...] una [delle] zone del senso che acquista la parola in un qualche contesto; [...] è la zona più stabile, più unificata e più precisa. [...] Il significato [...] è quel punto immobile e immutabile che rimane stabile di fronte a tutti i cambiamenti di senso della parola nei diversi contesti (389)».

SINCRETISMO [syncretism] [sincretismo]

Il sincretismo costituisce il primo livello di generalizzazione (vedi) tipico del bambino molto piccolo; è caratterizzato da un raggruppamento «[...] informe, indeterminato fino al fondo, di 40

oggetti isolati che sono legati gli uni agli altri in un modo qualsiasi nella rappresentazione e nella percezione del bambino, in un’unica immagine fusa (149)». Vygotskij spiega che «alla base delle forme sincretiche stanno soprattutto i legami soggettivi emozionali tra le impressioni, prese dal bambino come legami delle cose (156)».

SISTEMA DI CONCETTI [concept system] [sistema de conceptos]
Vedi ASTRAZIONE, CONCETTO SCIENTIFICO, GENERALITÀ, GENERALIZZAZIONE

SOVRAPPOSIZIONE [juxtaposition] [superposición] Vedi COMPLESSO

SPOSTAMENTO [transfer] [transferencia] Vedi COMPLESSO

SUONO [sound] [sonido]
Vedi LINGUAGGIO EGOCENTRICO, LINGUAGGIO ESTERNO, LINGUAGGIO

INTERNO, SEGNO, SENSO, SIGNIFICATO

STRUMENTO DI PRODUZIONE INTELLETTUALE [means of intellectual production] [instrumento de producción intelectual]

Vedi SVILUPPO

41

SVILUPPO [development] [desarrollo]

Vygotskij definisce lo sviluppo come «[...] la formación de funciones compuestas, de sistemas de funciones, de funciones sistemáticas y de sistemas funcionales (Ivic 1994: 4)». Il grado di sviluppo mentale di un bambino viene stabilito mediante dei test che egli deve eseguire indipendentemente; questo metterà in luce le funzioni mentali maturate fino a quel momento e queste sono gli indicatori del grado di sviluppo. È importante sottolineare che «lo fundamental en el desarrollo no estriba en el progreso de cada función considerada por separado sino en el cambio de las relaciones entre las distintas funciones [...] (Ivić 1994: 4)». Analizzando il fenomeno da questo punto di vista, lo sviluppo si presenta come un processo che apporta dei cambiamenti interni nella psiche del soggetto attraverso l’uso di strumenti esterni. Più precisamente, «the child’s mind develops in the course of acquisition of social experiences, which are presented to the child in the form of special psychological tools: language, mnemonic techniques, formulae, concepts, symbols, signs, and so on. These tools are presented to the child by an adult or by more capable peers in the course of their joint activity. Given to and used by the child first at the external level, these tools then internalize and become the internal possession of the child, altering all his or her mental functions [...] (Karpov 1995: 1)», ristrutturandole a livelli via via superiori. Vygotskij afferma che «[...] la historia del desarrollo de las funciones mentales superiores aparece así como la historia de la transformación de los instrumentos del comportamiento social en instrumentos de la organización psicológica individual (Vygotskij, citato in Ivić 1994: 4)». Lo sviluppo avviene dunque attraverso la relazione sociale e non lo si considera solo in termini di sviluppo cognitivo, ma anche di intreccio fra sviluppo emotivo e sviluppo cognitivo; qui il motore trainante è il rapporto tra motivazioni e pensieri e gli strumenti forniti dall’educazione.

Le varie funzioni psichiche (percezione, emozione, memoria, pensiero, immaginazione, volontà) non hanno ciascuna una propria linea di sviluppo separata, ma costituiscono un sistema, in cui lo sviluppo di ogni elemento modifica il funzionamento degli altri. Esse si sviluppano

42

affinandosi qualitativamente, passando da elementari a superiori, non attraverso l’accumulo di legami associativi, come pensavano gli studiosi prima di Vygotskij, bensì attraverso la funzione mediatrice dei cosiddetti “strumenti di produzione intellettuale”, i quali elevano le funzioni mentali ad un livello che permette la sistematizzazione e il controllo del comportamento. Considerandolo in relazione all’apprendimento (vedi), lo sviluppo, non solo non corre parallelamente ad esso, o lo precede, come si pensava prima della formulazione della tesi di Vygotskij su tali processi, ma segue l’apprendimento, il quale lo spinge in avanti, stimolando la creazione di nuove formazioni e funzioni psichiche. Vygotskij ha infatti dimostrato che lo sviluppo deve ancora essere immaturo quando ha inizio l’apprendimento affinché questo sia efficace e lo sarà solo se collocato entro la zona di sviluppo prossimo (vedi). A livello di ritmo, lo sviluppo si realizza differentemente rispetto all’apprendimento; ne consegue che esso non deve essere subordinato al programma scolastico. Le ricerche di Vygotskij hanno anche dimostrato che ogni materia contribuisce alla maturazione delle varie funzioni mentali dello scolaro, il quale giungerà ad utilizzarle anche per la risoluzione di problemi attinenti alla sfera della vita quotidiana. Lo sviluppo avviene quindi attraverso l’apprendimento, è il fine dell’apprendimento; questo «sarebbe completamente inutile, se potesse utilizzare soltanto ciò che già è maturato nello sviluppo, se non fosse di per sé la fonte di sviluppo, la fonte di un nuovo principio (275)».

SVILUPPO ARTIFICIALE [artificial development] [desarrollo artificial] Vedi APPRENDIMENTO

43

TRATTO DISTINTIVO [distinctive trait] [trato distintivo]

V edi COMPLESSO, COMPLESSO ASSOCIA TIVO, COMPLESSO A CA TENA, COMPLESSO COLLEZIONE, COMPLESSO DIFFUSO, CONCETTO, CONCETTO POTENZIALE, PSEUDOCONCETTO

UNITÀ COMPONENTE [component unit] [unidad componente]

Quando si parla di unità componente si fa riferimento al metodo su cui si basa Vygotskij per analizzare il fenomeno del rapporto tra pensiero e linguaggio, appunto il metodo «che decompone un insieme unitario di base in unità componenti. Per unità componenti intendiamo quei prodotti dell’analisi tali che, pur nella differenza degli elementi, possiedono le proprietà fondamentali proprie dell’insieme, e che sono parti viventi, non decomponibili ulteriormente, di questa unità globale. [...] Che cos’è dunque questa unità che non è più decomponibile ed in cui vi sono le proprietà del linguaggio verbale [e del pensiero] come insieme? Pensiamo che questa unità possa trovarsi nella parte interna della parola: nel suo significato (vedi) [...] perché proprio nel significato della parola sta il centro di questa unità che chiameremo pensiero verbale (vedi) (13)»; il significato risulta essere quindi allo stesso tempo un fenomeno intellettivo e verbale, adatto all’analisi del pensiero e del linguaggio considerati nella loro unione. Vygotskij conferisce all’analisi in unità componenti il merito di mostrare «che in ogni idea si trova, in forma rimaneggiata, la relazione affettiva dell’uomo con la realtà rappresentata in questa idea. Essa permette di scoprire il movimento diretto dai bisogni e dagli impulsi dell’uomo ad una certa direzione del suo pensiero e il movimento inverso dalla dinamica del pensiero alla dinamica del comportamento e dell’attività concreta della persona (20)».

VOCALIZZAZIONE [vocalization] [vocalización]
Vedi LINGUAGGIO EGOCENTRICO, LINGUAGGIO ESTERNO

44

VOLATILIZZAZIONE [turning of speech into inward thought] [volatilización]

Vygotskij usa questo termine per indicare il passaggio dalla parola al pensiero, ovvero dal linguaggio esterno (vedi) al linguaggio interno (vedi). Lo studioso russo afferma che «se tutto il linguaggio esterno è un processo di trasformazione del pensiero in parole, la materializzazione è l’oggettivazione del pensiero, allora osserviamo qui un processo inverso, un processo che va in qualche modo dall’esterno verso l’interno, un processo di volatilizzazione del linguaggio nel pensiero, ma il linguaggio non scompare affatto, anche nella sua forma interna. [...] Il linguaggio interno è sempre un linguaggio, cioè un pensiero legato alla parola. Ma se il pensiero si incarna nella parola nel linguaggio esterno, allora la parola scompare nel linguaggio interno, dando origine al pensiero (387)».

ZONA DI SVILUPPO PROSSIMO [zone of proximal development] [zona de desarrollo próximo]

Area in cui sono presenti i margini entro cui si può realizzare lo sviluppo futuro del bambino nel momento in cui egli è supportato dalla presenza di un adulto che collabora con lui o che funge da modello da imitare, fornendogli la possibilità di ampliare le sue capacità intellettive fino al limite massimo dettato dal suo sviluppo attuale e dalle sue attuali possibilità intellettive. La zona di sviluppo prossimo è il parametro che completa il quadro globale del grado di sviluppo mentale del bambino in quanto non prende in considerazione solo le funzioni e le capacità già maturate nel bambino, ma anche quelle appena comparse e in via di maturazione. L’importanza della zona di sviluppo prossimo si manifesta «nella dinamica dello sviluppo mentale del bambino durante l’apprendimento e nella riuscita di questi due fenomeni considerati in relazione tra loro (270)». Infatti, le possibilità di apprendimento (vedi) e il corso dello sviluppo (vedi) mentale del bambino si basano proprio sulla zona di sviluppo prossimo, così come l’insegnamento, di conseguenza. Il contenuto vero e proprio del concetto di zona di sviluppo

45

prossimo sta nella possibilità dello sviluppo «di elevarsi attraverso la collaborazione ad un livello intellettivo superiore, la possibilità di passare da ciò che in bambino sa fare a ciò che non sa fare, mediante l’imitazione (272)» durante l’apprendimento, il quale deve precedere e stimolare lo sviluppo, trainandolo dietro di sé. È importante precisare che il concetto di zona di sviluppo prossimo si basa proprio sul principio per cui «in collaborazione il bambino può fare sempre di più che da solo (270)»; egli, infatti, se spronato e aiutato da un adulto attraverso la proposta di esempi o di domande che spingono il bambino a mettere in gioco e potenziare le sue abilità, può superare se stesso e le sue capacità, può arrivare ad un livello superiore di attività intellettive, giungendo a risolvere problemi che per difficoltà si addicono a bambini più grandi. Come afferma Vygotskij, «[...] dobbiamo sempre determinare la soglia inferiore di apprendimento. Ma così non si chiude la questione: dobbiamo saper determinare anche la soglia superiore di apprendimento. Solo nei limiti tra le due soglie l’apprendimento può risultare fruttuoso (274)» e può portare in vita i processi di sviluppo potenziale del bambino. Questi due margini vanno proprio a determinare il periodo della zona di sviluppo prossimo, il quale viene anche denominato comunemente periodo sensitivo (vedi). È inoltre bene puntualizzare che la zona di sviluppo prossimo differisce da soggetto a soggetto nonostante la parità di età; Vygotskij scrive infatti che «la possibilità più o meno grande di passaggio del bambino da ciò che sa fare indipendentemente a ciò che sa fare in collaborazione è il sintomo più sensibile che caratterizza la dinamica dello sviluppo e della riuscita del bambino (271)». Le ricerche di Vygotskij mostrano che ciò che è presente nella zona di sviluppo prossimo in un determinato stadio di età si realizza nel livello di sviluppo superiore andando così a determinare il livello presente di sviluppo del bambino in un’età successiva.

46

APPENDICE DI RIFERIMENTO ITALIANO-INGLESE- SPAGNOLO

Agglutinazione

Agglutination

Aglutinación

Apprendimento

Learning

Aprendizaje

Attività verbale

Verbal activity

Actividad verbal

Astrazione

Abstraction

Abstracción

Complesso

Complex

Complejo

Complesso associativo

Associative complex

Complejo asociativo

Complesso a catena

Chain complex

Complejo cadena

Complesso collezione

Collection

Colección

Complesso diffuso

Diffuse complex

Complejo difundido

Concetto

Concept

Concepto

Concetto potenziale

Potential concept

Concepto potencial

Concetto quotidiano

Everyday concept

Concepto cotidiano

Concetto scientifico

Scientific concept

Concepto científico

Concetto spontaneo

Spontaneous concept

Concepto espontáneo

Condensazione

Condensation

Condensación

Endofasia

Endophasy

Endofasia

Equivalenza dei concetti

Equivalence of concepts

Equivalencia de conceptos

Fase affettivo-volitiva

Affective-volitional stage

Fase afectiva / volitiva

Fase emozionale

Emotional stage

Fase emocional

Fase pre-intellettiva

Pre-intellective stage

Fase pre-intelectiva

Fusione concreta

Concrete fusion

Fusión concreta

Generalità

Generality

Generalidad

Generalizzazione

Generalization

Generalización

Idiomaticità

Idiomaticity

Idiomaticidad

Influenza del senso

Influx of sense

Influjo de sentido

Introspezione

Introspection

Introspección

Legame associativo

Associative bond

Vínculo asociativo

Lingua

Language

Lengua

Lingua materna

Native language

Lengua materna

Lingua straniera

Foreign language

Lengua extranjera

Linguaggio

Language

Lenguaje

Linguaggio afasico

Aphasic speech

Lenguaje afásico

Linguaggio egocentrico

Egocentric speech

Lenguaje egocéntrico

Linguaggio esterno

External speech

Lenguaje exterior / externo

Linguaggio fasico

Phasic speech

Lenguaje afásico

Linguaggio intellettivo

Intellective speech

Lenguaje intelectivo

Linguaggio interno

Inner speech

Lenguaje interior / interno

Linguaggio orale

Oral speech

Lenguaje oral

Linguaggio scritto

Written speech

Lenguaje escrito

Parola

Word

Palabra

Partecipazione

Participation

Participación

Pensiero artificiale

Artificial thought

Pensamiento artificial

Pensiero astratto

Abstract thought

Pensamiento abstracto

47

Pensiero concreto

Concrete thought

Pensamiento concreto

Pensiero per complessi

Complex thinking

Pensamiento por complejos

Pensiero per concetti

Concept thinking

Pensamiento por conceptos

Pensiero verbale

Verbal thought

Pensamiento verbal

Periodo sensitivo

Sensitive period

Período sensitivo

Predicatività

Predication

Predicatividad

Presa di coscienza

To become conscious / aware

Toma de conciencia

Pseudoconcetto

Pseudo-concept

Pseudoconcepto

Riferimento all’oggetto

Referent

Referencia al objeto

Segno

Sign

Signo

Senso

Sense

Sentido

Significato

Meaning

Significado

Sincretismo

Syncretism

Sincretismo

Sistema di concetti

Concept system

Sistema de conceptos

Sovrapposizione

Juxtaposition

Superposición

Spostamento

Transfer

Transferencia

Suono

Sound

Sonido

Strumento di produzione intellettuale

Means of intellectual production

Instrumento de producción intelectual

Sviluppo

Development

Desarrollo

Sviluppo artificiale

Artificial development

Desarrollo artificial

Tratto distintivo

Distinctive trait

Trato distintivo

Unità componente

Component unit

Unidad componente

V ocalizzazione

V ocalization

V ocalización

V olatilizzazione

Turning of speech into inward thought

V olatilización

Zona di sviluppo prossimo

Zone of proximal development

Zona de desarrollo próximo

48

APPENDICE DI RIFERIMENTO INGLESE-ITALIANO- SPAGNOLO

Abstract thought

Pensiero astratto

Pensamiento abstracto

Abstraction

Astrazione

Abstracción

Affective-volitional stage

Fase affettivo-volitiva

Fase afectiva / volitiva

Agglutination

Agglutinazione

Aglutinación

Aphasic speech

Linguaggio afasico

Lenguaje afásico

Artificial development

Sviluppo artificiale

Desarrollo artificial

Artificial thought

Pensiero artificiale

Pensamiento artificial

Associative bond

Legame associativo

Vínculo asociativo

Associative complex

Complesso associativo

Complejo asociativo

Chain complex

Complesso a catena

Complejo cadena

Collection

Complesso collezione

Colección

Complex

Complesso

Complejo

Complex thinking

Pensiero per complessi

Pensamiento por complejos

Component unit

Unità componente

Unidad componente

Concept

Concetto

Concepto

Concept system

Sistema di concetti

Sistema de conceptos

Concept thinking

Pensiero per concetti

Pensamiento por conceptos

Concrete fusion

Fusione concreta

Fusión concreta

Concrete thought

Pensiero concreto

Pensamiento concreto

Condensation

Condensazione

Condensación

Development

Sviluppo

Desarrollo

Diffuse complex

Complesso diffuso

Complejo difundido

Distinctive trait

Tratto distintivo

Trato distintivo

Egocentric speech

Linguaggio egocentrico

Lenguaje egocéntrico

Emotional stage

Fase emozionale

Fase emocional

Endophasy

Endofasia

Endofasia

Equivalence of concepts

Equivalenza dei concetti

Equivalencia de conceptos

Everyday concept

Concetto quotidiano

Concepto cotidiano

External speech

Linguaggio esterno

Lenguaje exterior / externo

Foreign language

Lingua straniera

Lengua extranjera

Generality

Generalità

Generalidad

Generalization

Generalizzazione

Generalización

Idiomaticity

Idiomaticità

Idiomaticidad

Influx of sense

Influenza del senso

Influjo de sentido

Inner speech

Linguaggio interno

Lenguaje interior / interno

Intellective speech

Linguaggio intellettivo

Lenguaje intelectivo

Introspection

Introspezione

Introspección

Juxtaposition

Sovrapposizione

Superposición

Language

Lingua

Lengua

Language

Linguaggio

Lenguaje

Learning

Apprendimento

Aprendizaje

Meaning

Significato

Significado

49

Means of intellectual production

Strumento di produzione intellettuale

Instrumento de producción intelectual

Native language

Lingua materna

Lengua materna

Oral speech

Linguaggio orale

Lenguaje oral

Participation

Partecipazione

Participación

Phasic speech

Linguaggio fasico

Lenguaje afásico

Potential concept

Concetto potenziale

Concepto potencial

Predication

Predicatività

Predicatividad

Pre-intellective stage

Fase pre-intellettiva

Fase pre-intelectiva

Pseudo-concept

Pseudoconcetto

Pseudoconcepto

Referent

Riferimento all’oggetto

Referencia al objeto

Scientific concept

Concetto scientifico

Concepto científico

Sense

Senso

Sentido

Sensitive period

Periodo sensitivo

Período sensitivo

Sign

Segno

Signo

Sound

Suono

Sonido

Spontaneous concept

Concetto spontaneo

Concepto espontáneo

Syncretism

Sincretismo

Sincretismo

To become conscious / aware

Presa di coscienza

Toma de conciencia

Transfer

Spostamento

Transferencia

Turning of speech into inward thought

V olatilizzazione

V olatilización

Verbal activity

Attività verbale

Actividad verbal

Verbal thought

Pensiero verbale

Pensamiento verbal

V ocalization

V ocalizzazione

V ocalización

Word

Parola

Palabra

Written speech

Linguaggio scritto

Lenguaje escrito

Zone of proximal development

Zona di sviluppo prossimo

Zona de desarrollo próximo

50

APPENDICE DI RIFERIMENTO SPAGNOLO-ITALIANO- INGLESE

Abstracción

Astrazione

Abstraction

Actividad verbal

Attività verbale

Verbal activity

Aglutinación

Agglutinazione

Agglutination

Aprendizaje

Apprendimento

Learning

Colección

Complesso collezione

Collection

Complejo

Complesso

Complex

Complejo asociativo

Complesso associativo

Associative complex

Complejo cadena

Complesso a catena

Chain complex

Complejo difundido

Complesso diffuso

Diffuse complex

Concepto

Concetto

Concept

Concepto científico

Concetto scientifico

Scientific concept

Concepto cotidiano

Concetto quotidiano

Everyday concept

Concepto espontáneo

Concetto spontaneo

Spontaneous concept

Concepto potencial

Concetto potenziale

Potential concept

Condensación

Condensazione

Condensation

Desarrollo

Sviluppo

Development

Desarrollo artificial

Sviluppo artificiale

Artificial development

Endofasia

Endofasia

Endophasy

Equivalencia de conceptos

Equivalenza dei concetti

Equivalence of concepts

Fase afectiva / volitiva

Fase affettivo-volitiva

Affective-volitional stage

Fase emocional

Fase emozionale

Emotional stage

Fase pre-intelectiva

Fase pre-intellettiva

Pre-intellective stage

Fusión concreta

Fusione concreta

Concrete fusion

Generalidad

Generalità

Generality

Generalización

Generalizzazione

Generalization

Idiomaticidad

Idiomaticità

Idiomaticity

Influjo de sentido

Influenza del senso

Influx of sense

Instrumento de producción intelectual

Strumento di produzione intellettuale

Means of intellectual production

Introspección

Introspezione

Introspection

Lengua

Lingua

Language

Lengua extranjera

Lingua straniera

Foreign language

Lengua materna

Lingua materna

Native language

Lenguaje

Linguaggio

Language

Lenguaje afásico

Linguaggio afasico

Aphasic speech

Lenguaje afásico

Linguaggio fasico

Phasic speech

Lenguaje egocéntrico

Linguaggio egocentrico

Egocentric speech

Lenguaje escrito

Linguaggio scritto

Written speech

Lenguaje exterior / externo

Linguaggio esterno

External speech

Lenguaje intelectivo

Linguaggio intellettivo

Intellective speech

Lenguaje interior / interno

Linguaggio interno

Inner speech

51

Lenguaje oral

Linguaggio orale

Oral speech

Palabra

Parola

Word

Participación

Partecipazione

Participation

Pensamiento abstracto

Pensiero astratto

Abstract thought

Pensamiento artificial

Pensiero artificiale

Artificial thought

Pensamiento concreto

Pensiero concreto

Concrete thought

Pensamiento por complejos

Pensiero per complessi

Complex thinking

Pensamiento por conceptos

Pensiero per concetti

Concept thinking

Pensamiento verbal

Pensiero verbale

Verbal thought

Período sensitivo

Periodo sensitivo

Sensitive period

Predicatividad

Predicatività

Predication

Pseudoconcepto

Pseudoconcetto

Pseudo-concept

Referencia al objeto

Riferimento all’oggetto

Referent

Sentido

Senso

Sense

Significado

Significato

Meaning

Signo

Segno

Sign

Sincretismo

Sincretismo

Syncretism

Sistema de conceptos

Sistema di concetti

Concept system

Sonido

Suono

Sound

Superposición

Sovrapposizione

Juxtaposition

Toma de conciencia

Presa di coscienza

To become conscious / aware

Transferencia

Spostamento

Transfer

Trato distintivo

Tratto distintivo

Distinctive trait

Unidad componente

Unità componente

Component unit

Vínculo asociativo

Legame associativo

Associative bond

V ocalización

V ocalizzazione

V ocalization

V olatilización

V olatilizzazione

Turning of speech into inward thought

Zona de desarrollo próximo

Zona di sviluppo prossimo

Zone of proximal development

52

RIFERIMENTI BIBLIOGRAFICI

CARNAROLI, Francesco. Vygotskij e la psicoanalisi: relazione, linguaggio, coscienza riflessiva, [on line]. [Roma, Italia]: Psychomedia, 2001 [citato dicembre 2004]. Psicoterapia e scienze umane, N . 3 / 2001. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.psychomedia.it/pm- revs/journrev/psu/psu-2001-3-b.htm>.

— Aspetti della ricerca sul dialogo in psicoanalisi, [on line]. [Roma, Italia]: Psychomedia, 2001 [citato dicembre 2004]. Sezione: Modelli e ricerche in psicoterapia, Area: Emozioni e linguaggio nelle narrative. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.psychomedia.it/pm/modther/emozling/carnaroli.htm+Vygotskij+%22linguaggio+i nterno%22&hl=en&lr=lang_it>.

CASTORRI, Emanuela. Vygotskij, Piaget, Bruner. Concezioni dello sviluppo, [on line]. [Milano, Italia]: Raffaello Cortina Editore, 1998 [citato dicembre 2004]. La mediazione pedagogica. Disponibile dal world wide web: <web.tiscali.it/mediazionepedagogica/anno_02/numero_01/Castorri/par01.htm+%22linguaggio +egocentrico%22+piaget+vygotskij&hl=en&lr=lang_it>.

DAS, J. P.. Some Thoughts on two Aspects of Vygotsky’s Work. Articolo in Educational Psychologist, [on line]. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., vol. 30, n 3, 1995 [citato dicembre 2004]. p. 93-97. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77519474>.

IVIC, Ivan. Lev Semionovich Vygotsky (1896-1934). In Perspectivas: revista trimestral de educación comparada, [on line]. UNESCO: Oficina Internacional de Educación, vol. XXIV, n 3-4, 1994 [citato dicembre 2004]. p. 773-779, s.i.t.. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.ibe.unesco.org/International/Publications/Thinkers/ThinkersPdf/vygotskys.PDF+V ygotskij+%22lenguaje+interior%22&hl=en>.

KARPOV, Yuriy V.. L. S. Vygotsky and the Doctrine of Empirical and Theoretical Learning. In Educational Psychologist, [on line]. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., vol. 30, n 3, 1995 [citato dicembre 2004]. p. 61-66. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77519406>.

— Two Ways to Elaborate Vygotsky’s Concept of Mediation Implications for Instruction. In American Psychologist, [on line]. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., vol. 53, n 1, 1998 [citato dicembre 2004]. p. 27. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=96542058>.

KOZULIN, Alex. Mediated Learning Experience and Psychological Tools: Vygotsky’s and Feuerstein’s Perspectives in a Study of Student Learning. In Educational Psychologist, [on line]. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., vol. 30, n 3, 1995 [citato dicembre 2004]. p. 67-75. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77519420>.

OSIMO, Bruno. Corso di traduzione [on line]. [Modena, Italia]: Logos, 2004 [citato dicembre 2004]. Prima parte, La lettura – Parte prima. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.logos.it/pls/dictionary/linguistic_resources.cap_1_6?lang=it >.

53

— Corso di traduzione [on line]. [Modena, Italia]: Logos, 2004 [citato dicembre 2004]. Prima parte, La scrittura come processo mentale. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.logos.it/pls/dictionary/linguistic_resources.cap_1_8?lang=it>.

— Corso di traduzione [on line]. [Modena, Italia]: Logos, 2004 [citato dicembre 2004]. Seconda parte, Lettura e formazione dei concetti. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.logos.it/pls/dictionary/linguistic_resources.cap_2_4?lang=it>.

— Corso di traduzione [on line]. [Modena, Italia]: Logos, 2004 [citato dicembre 2004]. Seconda parte, Lettura ed evoluzione dei concetti. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.logos.it/pls/dictionary/linguistic_resources.cap_2_5?lang=it>.

— Storia della traduzione, riflessioni sul linguaggio traduttivo dall’antichità ai contemporanei, Milano, Hoepli, 2002, ISBN 8820330733.

TAPPAN, Mark V. Sociocultural Psychology and Caring Pedagogy: Exploring Vygotsky’s “Hidden Curriculum”. In Educational Psychologist, [on line]. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., vol. 33, n 1, 1998 [citato dicembre 2004]. p. 23. Disponibile dal world wide web: <http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=76994962>.

VYGOTSKIJ, Lev Semënovič, Pensiero e linguaggio, introduzione, traduzione e commento di Luciano Mecacci, 1990, settima edizione 2003, Moskva-Leningrad, Editori Laterza, [prima edizione 1934], ISBN 88-420-3953-5.

— Thought and Language, edited and translated by Eugenia Hanfmann and Gertrude Vakar, Moscow-Leningrad, The M.I.T Press, 1962.

54

Angela Catrani intervista Bruno Osimo sul tema della traduzione Civica Scuola Interpreti Traduttori «Altiero Spinelli»

Dal momento in cui l’uomo ha iniziato a interrogarsi su se stesso, il problema delle diverse lingue che si parlano nel mondo ha incuriosito, affascinato, preoccupato, tanto che una delle prime “storie” raccontate nella Bibbia, e declinate in varie forme artistiche e culturali, è la storia biblica sulle origini delle differenze linguistiche, racconto che nella sua struttura narrativa sfiora il mito: parlo, naturalmente, dell’episodio noto come La Torre di Babele, che spiega come la proliferazione nel mondo di migliaia di lingue differenti sia stata una punizione divina per la superbia dell’uomo. Forse è proprio questa punizione divina che mi porto addosso, la mia assoluta incapacità di imparare una lingua straniera, ad avermi, per contrasto, fatto innamorare prima delle lingue cosiddette morte, il latino e il greco, e poi della scienza della traduzione, e dei traduttori in particolare, da me considerati ponte necessario (e vitale) per accedere agli amatissimi libri scritti in origine in altra lingua. La traduzione, ci insegnano i semiologi, è intorno a noi, filtra il mondo attraverso i nostri occhi e le nostre orecchie, attraversa i nostri studi e le nostre conoscenze. La percezione che ognuno di noi ha di un qualsiasi oggetto, anche il più comune, è talmente diversa che a volte occorre proprio una “traduzione” in un linguaggio codificato e fisso. Apro la conversazione con Bruno Osimo, professore universitario, semiotico, traduttore, scrittore. La sua competenza mi aiuterà a entrare nel tema, a districarmi tra significato e significante, tra metatesto e paratesto, cercando di capire cosa renda così affascinante e misteriosa questa scienza. Bruno Osimo studia le lingue da quando, come racconta nel suo libro Dizionario affettivo della lingua ebraica, ha scoperto che la lingua che parlava sua madre non era italiano, ma il tamponico, cioè una lingua volta a tradurre la realtà perché non ci faccia troppo male. Inglese e russo sono le sue lingue d’elezione e di insegnamento, a cui si affianca la Scienza della traduzione, materia fondamentale del primo anno della Scuola per interpreti e traduttori, laurea triennale.

Angela Catrani

Caro Bruno, ho la fortuna di conoscerti ormai da qualche anno, da quando ho superato la timidezza dopo aver letto il Dizionario affettivo e ti ho fatto i complimenti tramite Facebook. Sorprendentemente mi rispondesti e da quel momento avviammo un dialogo proficuo e costruttivo, almeno per me. Per Voland, due anni fa, hai affrontato una traduzione inconsueta e innovativa de I racconti di Odessa di Gogol, una traduzione in cui hai potuto mettere in atto tutta la teoria della Scienza della traduzione, rompendo gli argini rispetto a una staticità e piattezza che forse ha attraversato tutta la narrativa tradotta in Italia: il linguaggio che usi fa ampio utilizzo di parole dialettali, neologismi, errori, cercando di proiettare il lettore nella cultura poliedrica, multiforme, oserei dire “caciarona” della Odessa della fine dell’Ottocento. Partiamo proprio da qui: cosa e come una traduzione letteraria deve rispettare del testo originario?

Bruno Osimo

La tua domanda apre molti spiragli anche sui costrutti culturali impliciti nell’ambiente da cui è stata generata. Volendo ci si potrebbe domandare cos’è una traduzione “letteraria”: io sono incline a pensare alle traduzioni come processi – “letterari” o no – teoricamente identici e sempre creativi. Quando il testo è artistico, anche la traduzione ha una componente artistica, che comunque si affianca a quella razionale, necessariamente propria del traduttore. Ci si potrebbe domandare anche cosa significa «rispettare». Il primo rispetto che si deve all’originale penso che sia riconoscerne l’alterità, o meglio riconoscere l’alterità della traduzione. Trovo che presentare le traduzioni come “equivalenti” dell’originale sia un pericoloso processo di negazione. È rispetto prima di tutto della realtà delle cose. Riconoscimento della propria impotenza («Non posso leggere quel libro in originale perché non so quella lingua»); riconoscimento che la traduzione comporta alcuni passaggi mentali anche parzialmente inconsci e che è quindi sempre traduzione intersemiotica, frutto di pesanti influenze e interferenze della poetica del traduttore; quindi riconoscimento che le culture che s’incontrano e si scontrano nel processo traduttivo sono almeno tre: quella emittente, quella traducente, quella ricevente. Rispetto del lettore, che non va imbonito a credere che sta leggendo “lo stesso libro”, ma educato a pensare che ne sta leggendo un altro, non solo scritto in un’altra lingua da un’altra persona che è un altro autore, ma anche scritto in un diverso linguaggio culturalmente parlando: il linguaggio che il traduttore ha inventato apposta per riuscire a mettere in comunicazione prototesto e cultura ricevente. Quello che ho detto riflette una visione del mondo delle culture come fenomeni eterogenei e reciprocamente interessanti, e quindi la traduzione come inserimento dell’altrui nel proprio; ma naturalmente esiste anche la traduzione intesa come assorbimento, furto, prestito, che quindi si configura come appropriazione dell’altrui. È un po’ come la differenza che c’è tra citazione e plagio. Il plagio (traduzione appropriante) non è sempre volontario: può anche essere inconscio e anzi forse lo è nella maggior parte dei casi. Forse il rispetto del testo originario in essenza è rispetto per sé stessi, cura per l’autodefinizione di sé e altrettanta cura per la definizione dell’altro, delimitazione del proprio e dell’altrui e individuazione di strategie comunicative che esprimano la dialettica tra queste tre entità: altrui primario (segno), proprio traduttivo (interpretante), altrui secondario (oggetto). Sempre tenendo conto che nel mare dell’intertestualità sempre più feconda, concetti come «prototesto» e «testo primario» possono solo avere valore relativo, allo stesso modo in cui in semiotica l’interpretante del primo segno può a sua volta farsi segno “primario” di una successiva triade.

A. C.

I passaggi inconsci di cui parli riguardano i processi culturali impliciti del traduttore o moti emotivi legati al contenuto del testo che si sta traducendo?

Bruno Osimo

I passaggi inconsci riguardano sia l’inconscio soggettivo del traduttore sia, per così dire, l’inconscio della cultura di

appartenenza del traduttore. Possono verificarsi interferenze tra l’ideologia (in senso profondo, psichico) del traduttore e l’ideologia del testo, che danno luogo a quella che Popovič chiama «traduzione polemica». Possono anche esserci “zone d’ombra” della cultura ricevente intesa come collettivo, e allora nascono difficoltà di decodifica di determinati elementi del prototesto perché manca la specializzazione percettivo-cognitiva necessaria.

A. C.

Come e quanto entra la psiche del traduttore e quanto è opportuno che si cerchi di restare il più neutri possibili?

Bruno Osimo

La pretesa di neutralità del traduttore è – secondo me – insensata, e forse ha un parallelo nella pretesa di neutralità dello psicoterapeuta. Se, come ci diceva già Kant, la percezione è giudizio, già la percezione è ideologica, e con questo la neutralità è inesistente fin da subito. Il traduttore non deve restare neutro, ma deve dichiarare la propria ideologia. Messo a confronto con il prototesto, e con la necessità di proiettarne il senso sulla cultura ricevente, il traduttore elabora (consapevolmente o no) un linguaggio nuovo, fatto su misura per convogliare ciò che soggettivamente per il traduttore è il senso dominante del prototesto verso la cultura ricevente. Nel paratesto (per esempio in una postfazione) il traduttore denuda la propria strategia, denuncia la propria ideologia interpretativa, dichiara i propri intenti comunicativi e, nel contempo, confessa anche il proprio residuo (loss, perdita, lutto): anziché negarlo, il lutto, lo elabora (proprio come avviene in psicoanalisi) e lo svela al lettore.

A. C.

Riesci a farmi qualche esempio pratico, di traduzioni famose, per esempio? Oppure di risoluzione di un conflitto interno?

Angela Catrani, Bruno Osimo

Prendiamo come esempio il concetto di pošlost’ in Čehov. La pošlost’ deriva dal verbo hodit’ che significa «andare» ed è una specie ben precisa di volgarità. La volgarità è un concetto molto culturospecifico. Per esempio, nella cultura italiana contemporanea «volgarità» è spesso accostato a sessualità e a pornografia. In Čehov invece la pošlost’ è spesso accostata alla sytnost’, ossia alla sazietà. Se si considera l’opera di Čehov nell’insieme, si trovano svariati riferimenti alla sazietà, sia alimentare sia monetaria sia sul piano di quelli che ora chiameremmo i comfort, che è disprezzata dai personaggi che sono alter ego dell’autore. La sazietà materiale porta a una sorta di “sazietà spirituale” che è nemica dell’intelligenza, della curiosità, dell’attività che in ebraico si chiama tiqun olam, ossia riparare il mondo, valore di cui Čehov, non ebreo, sembra però carico.

Se si traduce Čehov in italiano, la cultura italiana presenta un enorme “buco nero” intorno a questo concetto. Buona parte delle attività popolari in Italia – mangiare, bere, sdraiarsi al sole, tradire il partner, fare il furbo, cavarsela con mezzucci – sono pošlye per Čehov, mentre da noi è considerato stereotipicamente volgare, che ne so, sfogliare Playboy o esprimersi in termini scatologici. In altre parole, la cultura espressa da un racconto di Čehov, letta dal mediatore culturale che è il traduttore e proiettata sulla attuale cultura italiana di massa produce una sorta di corto circuito. C’è un antropologo statunitense, Michael Agar, che definisce questi cortocircuiti «rich points», punti di arricchimento, perché dal punto di vista del confronto con culture altre avere un momento di smarrimento in cui non si riesce a capire/tradurre qualcosa è benefico e arricchisce. Qui si parrà la tua nobilitate, traduttore, perché ci sono due strategie con due esiti molto diversi. Una strategia stucca e liscia il muro e poi fa un ritocco di pittura, perché non si noti che la differenza culturale ha prodotto una crepa e magari fatto cadere un pezzo d’intonaco. L’altra strategia non persegue la liscezza del muro, ma insegue la dialettica tra le differenze: lascia che l’intonaco si stacchi, anzi fa cadere anche quello tremolante non ancora staccato, e poi fissa il muro e permette a chi lo osserva di accettarlo per quello che è: il frutto di un confronto tra culture diverse.

In termini strettamente traduttivi, il primo mediatore trova una soluzione andante (pošlyj, per l’appunto), trova un traducente come gretto o triviale e procede con il suo lavoro; il secondo mediatore apre un varco nella cultura cehoviana, parla della pošlost’ nella prosfazione o nelle note, informa i lettori che si trovano di fronte a un rich point, e chi ha voglia di arricchirsi si arricchisca (con l’aiuto del traduttore), e gli altri pàssino oltre.

A. C.

Come ultima domanda vorrei parlare proprio della tua particolare traduzione de I racconti di Odessa, completa, come da te teorizzato, di una prefazione in cui dichiari il tuo intento traduttorio. Questo apparato paratestuale diventa così parte integrante e necessaria di un libro, che non è più e solo di Babel, ma diventa di Babel-Osimo (come tra l’altro è dichiarato in copertina). Ci puoi raccontare la genesi di questo libro e della libertà che ti ha concesso l’editore di Voland?

Bruno Osimo

La traduzione mi è stata commissionata (non ho scelto io il testo) in quanto traduttore-autore (purtroppo in Italia si tende a pensare che un traduttore che non scrive anche in proprio sia uno scalino più giù nella scala socioculturale) perché la collana è riservata a classici tradotti da scrittori. Questa impostazione, già di suo, implica che il traduttore non sia stato incaricato di un lavoro di bassa manovalanza (come ahimè avviene a volte nella mentalità dell’editore) ma abbia anche una sua sfera di autonomia. In effetti ho intrapreso la traduzione senza preparazione e, man mano che procedevo, mi sono reso conto che mi stavo addentrando in un mondo stranissimo, caratterizzato non da una sola cultura ma dall’incontro/scontro di tante culture in un cronotopo variopinto, eterogeneo, screziato. Se ero sconcertato io, che nel cunicolo ero il capofila con la torcia accesa nell’elmetto, figuriamoci quelli in fila dietro di me – i lettori – che sarebbero passati più frettolosamente e con meno possibilità d’illuminazione – pensavo.

La mia preoccupazione dominante in questo frangente era di evitare il più possibile l’appiattimento. Da lettore mi stavo gustando un piatto esotico pieno di combinazioni creative di sapori inediti e come autore non volevo consegnare a mia volta ai miei lettori un anonimo sofficino surgelato da sbattere nel microonde e trangugiare spensieratamente. Quindi mi sono ingegnato come potevo per creare un (sotto) linguaggio, uno stile, dei tratti che dessero al lettore italiano l’idea di qualcosa di strano, di nuovo, di esotico, forse non del tutto comprensibile, ma che stimola la curiosità e la voglia di conoscere e di esplorare. Daniela Di Sora è stata molto collaborativa e non solo ha assecondato la mia richiesta di scrivere una postfazione, ma mi ha addirittura proposto una prefazione, che è molto più impegnativa e “invadente” dal punto di vista del lettore. Lavorare così è un lusso (in Italia) e credo che bisognerebbe adoperarsi tutti per trasformarla da eccezione a regola.

Bruno Osimo è nato a Milano il 14 dicembre 1958 in una famiglia culturalmente ebraica laica non osservante. Ha un diploma di traduttore dal russo e dall’inglese e un dottorato in scienza della traduzione. Dal 1980 traduce per l’editoria e per le aziende. Dal 1989 è docente di traduzione e scienza della traduzione presso la Civica Scuola Interpreti e Traduttori di Milano. Dal 1998 pubblica con Hoepli testi sulla traduzione (il più recente è il «Manuale del traduttore di Giacomo Leopardi»). Nel 2002 ha pubblicato l’articolo «On psychological aspects of translation» su Sign Systems Studies e da allora sviluppa questo filone di ricerca. Dal 2007 traduce e divulga autori importanti dell’est europeo nel campo della semiotica della traduzione: Jakobson, Lotman, Torop, Popovič, Lûdskanov, Revzin, Rozencvejg. Dal 2011 ha pubblicato tre romanzi con Marcos y Marcos: “Dizionario affettivo della lingua ebraica”, “Bar Atlantic”, “Disperato erotico fox”.

osimo@trad.it

Angela Catrani nasce a Rimini e vive vicino a Bologna, in una grande casa ecologica di legno, con il marito, due figli e un cane. Dopo la Maturità classica, si laurea con lode in Lettere Moderne presso l’Università degli Studi di Bologna. Appassionata lettrice fin da bambina, alla classica domanda su “cosa vuoi fare da grande” risponde “Leggere”. Dato il suo carattere determinato, persegue il suo obiettivo e ora di professione principalmente legge e studia. Non aveva ancora terminato gli studi universitari e già lavorava in una casa editrice, Il Mulino, a cui è seguita una seconda casa editrice d’arte; ora lavora per una cooperativa sociale di Imola, Il Mosaico, per cui cura tutto il settore editoriale dei libri per bambini, in stretta sinergia con l’editore Bacchilega. Scrive articoli per riviste on line e per blog. Ha molte passioni e grandi entusiasmi, tra cui i libri per bambini, che ritiene essere una delle più alte espressioni artistiche in cui si possano coniugare spontaneità, eccellenza e bellezza.

angela.catrani@gmail.com

Pubblicato nel mese di febbraio 2016

www.aracne-rivista.it Rubriche 2016 – Transiti

Transiti #2

Iscritta nel Pubblico Registro della Stampa del Tribunale di Rimini: n° 11 del 24-05-2011 ISSN: 2239-0898

Roman Jakobson’s Translation Handbook

Bruno Osimo1

 

 

This book is based on the principle that it is possible to create a text out of the writings of an author, focusing on a subject that had not necessarily been considered central or fundamental in the original author’s view. Roman Jakobson wrote many articles and books, that only partially dealt with translation. My intention here is to synthesize his thought on translation by collecting a number of quotations from different papers and essays of different times, originally written in various languages, and rearranging them according to my own criteria.

 

jakobson handbook copertina

The result is a series of paragraphs and chapters whose identity derives from the assembling of heterogeneous texts that, however, see one given topic from different perspectives. The first chapters focus on inner language as a nonverbal code, and the consequences of the continuous shift from verbal to nonverbal and viceversa occurring during speech, writing – coding –, hearing, reading – decoding –, and therefore occurring within the translation process itself. The notion of “intersemiotic translation” is considered from a new perspective.

In the central chapter Jakobson’s distinctive features method is applied to translation. Using the similarity/contiguity and imputed/factual variables, taken from Peirce’s writings, Jakobson realizes that one of the four actualizations is missing from Peirce’s treatment. Translation, that according to Jakobson is not equivalence but evolution of sense, may well be imputed similarity, the missing actualization of the aforementioned variables.

In the third chapter the focus is on the difference between humane disciplines and exact sciences, and where translation studies belong. Scientific method should be limited to exact disciplines or extended to humane fields as well? This decision has many implications, starting from the name of our discipline – translation science, translatology, translation studies, translation theory – passing through scientific terminology and arriving to semiotics, that according to Jakobson is the science within which the translation discipline should develop itself. Since in classic times disciplines were divided into trivium (humane fields) and quadrivium (sciences), following Jakobson’s semiotic path would mean to overcome trivium, to get out of triviality, in a sense.

In a slightly different form the three chapters were published as articles as follows:

 

(2009). Jakobson and the mental phases of translation. Mutatis Mutandis, 2(1), 73 – 84.

(2008) Translation as imputed similarity”. Sign Systems Studies 36.2:315-339.

(2016) Translation from rags to riches in Jakobson. Sign Systems Studies, still to be defined.

 

 

 

http://store.streetlib.com/roman-jakobson-s-translation-handbook

 

Traduzione: aspetti mentali. Saggi di Peirce, Levý, Mahony, Schreier Rupprecht, Ullmann, Favareau

Ho pubblicato un nuovo ebook dedicato agli aspetti mentali della traduzione. Lo trovate qui: http://www.amazon.it/Traduzione-mentali-schreier-rupprecht-favareau-ebook/dp/B00IGII1WW/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1392654217&sr=1-1&keywords=osimo+aspetti+mentali

copertina piccolae in tutte le altre librerie online. È stato tradotto da moltissimi miei ex allievi dell’ISIT della Fondazione Milano:

Sara Beltrame, Sandiana Premoli, Corinna Paravicini, Stefania Fumagalli, Alessandra Pedrazzini, Samantha Orsini, Maddalena Macina, Valentina Manzoni, Fjodor Ardizzoia, Cristina Cavalli, Caterina Raschetti, Francesca Colombo, Clara Antonucci, Francesca Ioele, Valeria Bastia, Veronica Fumagalli, Claudia Lionetti, Eleonora Malara, Maryam Romagnoli Sacchi, Emanuela Cervini, Donatella Brigatti, Gaia Cozzi, Francesca Frazzica, Cinzia Di Barbara. Redazione di: Lucia Balzarotti, Silvia Besana.

Buona lettura!